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Author
The Associated Press
Date
May 10, 2014

10 Things to Know: This Week’s Takeaways

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Looking back at the stories to remember from the past week:

1. ON RUSSIA’S SACRED HOLIDAY, VLADIMIR PUTIN HAILS RETURN OF CRIMEA

On his first visit to the port of Sevastopol, Putin used Friday’s anniversary of the victory over Nazi Germany to celebrate the annexation of Crimea by Russia in the territorial crisis with Ukraine. His visit was strongly criticized by Kiev, which said it trampled on Ukraine’s sovereignty and international law. At least seven people were killed in violence in the eastern port of Mariupol.

2. U.S., BRITISH EXPERTS HELPING SEARCH FOR 276 ABDUCTED GIRLS IN NIGERIA

The girls were taken by Islamic militants from the group Boko Haram in northeastern Nigeria on April 15, and the government of President Goodluck Jonathan stands accused of being slow to mount operations to rescue them. The mass kidnapping has focused world attention on the group, with China, France and Spain also promising help.

3. U.S. CLIMATE CHANGE REPORT: PROBLEMS ARE ALREADY AFFECTING AMERICANS

The report, released Tuesday, said global warming is changing Americans’ daily lives with heat waves, wild storms and longer allergy seasons. It said those effects are likely to get worse and more expensive. White House science adviser John Holdren called the findings “the loudest and clearest alarm bell to date” on climate change.

4. PRIMARY ELECTIONS TEST STRENGTH OF TEA PARTY MOVEMENT

North Carolina House Speaker Thom Tillis captured the Republican nomination Tuesday to oppose imperiled Democratic Sen. Kay Hagan, overcoming anti-establishment rivals by a comfortable margin. In Ohio, Cuyahoga County Executive Ed FitzGerald won the Democratic nomination to challenge Gov. John Kasich in the fall. U.S. House speaker John Boehner rolled to re-nomination for another term in Congress, his 13th.

5. HOUSE REPUBLICANS PUSH THROUGH A MEASURE TO OPEN A NEW BENGHAZI INVESTIGATION

The bitterly divided House voted 232-186 to establish the panel that Speaker John Boehner insisted would answer questions that linger almost 20 months after the Sept. 11, 2012, attack on the U.S. diplomatic mission in Libya. Democrats called it a political ploy to raise campaign cash and motivate voters.

6. TARGET’S CEO STEPS DOWN IN FALLOUT FROM SECURITY BREACH

Gregg Steinhafel became the first boss of a major corporation to lose his job over a theft of customer data. Target announced Monday that Steinhafel stepped down nearly five months after the nation’s third-largest retailer disclosed that hackers stole credit- and debit-card records of millions of customers before Christmas.

7. CHINA’S ALIBABA SEEKS BLOCKBUSTER IPO IN UNITED STATES

Alibaba Group, the king of e-commerce in China, filed paperwork Tuesday that could result in one of the biggest initial public offerings in history. Although not well-known in the United States, the company is a behemoth that makes more money than Amazon and eBay combined. The deal expected to take shape in the next few months could surpass the $16 billion that Facebook and its early investors raised in an IPO two years ago.

8. SOUTH CAROLINA DEFENSIVE END JADEVEON CLOWNEY IS TOP PICK IN NFL DRAFT

The selection Thursday night by the Houston Texans brings size, speed and power to a lineup that already has 2012 NFL Defensive Player of the Year J.J. Watt. The draft’s other big name, Texas A&M quarterback Johnny Manziel, sat with a sullen look on his face until Cleveland took the 2012 Heisman Trophy winner at No. 22.

9. ACROBATS INJURED DURING AERIAL STUNT IN RHODE ISLAND

The women from the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus were injured at a performance Sunday in Providence in which they hung by their hair from a frame as a “human chandelier.” A clip securing the frame to the rafters snapped and they fell about 20 feet to the ground. Seven remained hospitalized as of Friday.

10. FORMER ITALIAN PREMIER BEGINS HIS COMMUNITY SERVICE WORK

Silvio Berlusconi showed up Friday at a facility for Alzheimer’s patients as part of a tax-fraud sentence. The 77-year-old former leader was ordered to perform four hours of community service for a year after his four-year sentence was reduced to one by a general amnesty.

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