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Date
March 13, 2012

College and Facebook

One in four schools are looking at profiles of applicants.
Transcript

Scott: Look, it is no secret you need to be careful with those status updates and pictures posted through social media. But you might be surprised to hear just who is checking out your profile.

Do you ever worry about what you put online?

What do you put online?

And it is easy to forget that what goes on here really goes everywhere.

“What they’re thinking about, to be frank, is how they can fit in and how they can look cool. But the problem is, the things that we think of doing in person, are now out there on the web for everyone to see.”

Scott: That “everyone” includes some pretty influential people, like college admission and scholarship officials. The National Scholarship Providers Association found one out of every four of those officials check an applicant’s Facebook and other internet activity. Some google potential students before making a decision. What they find isn’t always good.

“Don’t put anything on Facebook or other social media that you wouldn’t want your grandma to see.”

Scott: Some coaches are now asking for athletes’ passwords so they can supervise social media activity. There are potential employers doing the same thing.

Has anyone ever googled you? What did they find?

“OMG! It was so embarrassing!

Scott: To get a job, would you give up your Facebook password?

“I mean, to get a job maybe.”

“No. If I had to, I probably wouldn’t get that job.”

Scott: Would have to hurry to do some cleaning up before they looked at it?

“Yes!”

“No. I do a pretty good job of being careful on Facebook.”

Scott: College senior Stephanie Hatt quit Facebook after realizing just how public her posts were.

Stephanie Hatt: As time went on, I noticed something; people looking at your photos you didn’t want them to see, and then they would start talking.”

Scott: Civil rights activists are challenging this practice of cyber-investigating, calling it a violation of the First Amendment right to free speech. But in the meantime, remember that what is posted on the web really does go on your permanent record.

Scott Evans, Channel One News.

Correlations

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