ADVERTISEMENT
MORE ARTICLES

Fighting For Freedom

protestor-being-arrested-photos

Rosa Parks, Martin Luther King Jr. and Thurgood Marshall were three of the key players in our country’s 1960s civil rights movement. Yet thousands upon thousands of people — black and white — banned together, one struggle at a time to fight for the rights of African Americans.

How much do you know about the major events in civil rights history? Take the quiz below to find out.

Fighting for Freedom

Test your knowledge of civil rights history.

sit-in-museum-plaque-photos.jpg

When four college freshmen walked into a Greensboro, N.C., dime store on Monday, Jan. 1 1960, bought a few items, then sat down at the "whites only" lunch counter, they sparked a wave of civil rights protest that changed America.

To commemorate the events, struggles and achievements of the Civil Rights Movement, the Woolworth building in Greensboro, North Carolina was turned into a museum by founders Melvin Alston, a Guilford County commissioner, and Representative Earl Jones of the North Carolina legislature.

The center boasts 30,000 square feet of exhibition space with items that marked the historic sit-ins and demonstrations against racial segregation of the sixties. In this Jan. 7, 2010 photo, a historical marker is shown in front of the former F.W. Woolworth store at the new International Civil Rights Center and Museum in Greensboro, N.C.

(AP Photo/Chuck Burton)

sit-in-museum-counter-photos.jpg

On February 1, 1960, four African-American college students -- Joseph A. McNeil, Franklin E. McCain, David L. Richmond and Ezell A. Blair Jr. -- sat at a "whites only" lunch counter in North Carolina and tried to order some food. When they were refused because of their race, the students decided to sit at the counter to protest their right to be served.

They returned to this counter day after day, as new protesters joined. Soon, 1,000 protesters joined their cause along with many others in 55 cities and 13 states who began conducting sit-ins of their own. By July, lunch counters were desegregated because of this non-violent form of protest that became integral in the Civil Rights Movement.

In this Jan. 7, 2010 photo, the lunch counter at the former F.W. Woolworth is shown at the International Civil Rights Center and Museum in Greensboro, N.C. Four college freshmen walked into a Greensboro, N.C., dime store on Monday, Jan. 1 1960, bought a few items, then sat down at the "whites only" lunch counter, and sparked a wave of civil rights protest that changed America.

(AP Photo/Chuck Burton)

racist-signs-photos.jpg

The construction of an exhibit with racial segregation signs.

(AP Photo/Chuck Burton) box

sit-in-museum-construction-photos.jpg

Workers install exhibits at the International Civil Rights Center and Museum in Greensboro, N.C.

(AP Photo/Chuck Burton)

sit-in-museum-front-photos.jpg

A pedestrian makes his way past The International Civil Rights Center & Museum in Greensboro, N.C., Wednesday, Feb. 2, 2005. The center is located in the F.W. Woolworth building, birthplace of the Civil Rights movement where four freshmen from historically black North Carolina A&T State University sat at the store's whites-only lunch counter and requested service.

Instead of opening this month, a civil rights museum honoring the 1960s sit-ins at a former Woolworth's store here is bogged down in rising construction costs and weary donors. The 11-year-old project remains on hold with $10 million still needed.

(AP Photo/Gerry Broome, File)

civil-rights-museum-entrance-photos.jpg

In this photo, workers put the finishing touches at the International Civil Rights Center and Museum entrance.

(Photo/Chuck Burton)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>