Mt. Everest

Posted on: 08.18.2014 in interact > Geography

The peak of Mount Everest risesĀ 8,848 meters above sea level. And because it is the tallest mountain on the planet, humans have tried, both successfully and unsuccessfully, to reach it’s summit for almost 100 years of recorded history.

For a look at some of the breathtaking views of it’s peaks and valleys, without the need for an oxygen tank, check out the slideshow below.

Everest behind a Sherpa village. The Sherpa people have a long history of serving as mountain guides for those who want to reach the summit of the mountain and who can afford an expedition.

Everest behind a Sherpa village. The Sherpa people have a long history of serving as mountain guides for those who want to reach the summit of the mountain and who can afford an expedition.

Nepalese Sherpas with luggage make their way through the Khumbu Icefall to Everest base camp, Nepal.

Nepalese Sherpas with luggage make their way through the Khumbu Icefall to Everest base camp, Nepal.

Climate change is likely to make climbing Everest more dangerous than in the past. Photo: Associated Press

Climate change is likely to make climbing Everest more dangerous than in the past.

Photo: Associated Press

Everest with prayer flags in the foreground.

Everest with prayer flags in the foreground.

Mount Everest, left background, seen from above Everest Base camp, Nepal. Also seen is the Lhotse peak, right background, and the Khumbu icefall, center to bottom. Photo: Associated Press

Mount Everest, left background, seen from above Everest Base camp, Nepal. Also seen is the Lhotse peak, right background, and the Khumbu icefall, center to bottom.

Photo: Associated Press

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The Summit!

The Summit!

Prayer flag memorials at Chukpilhara, Nepal, commemorate those who perished climbing Mount Everest.

Prayer flag memorials at Chukpilhara, Nepal, commemorate those who perished climbing Mount Everest.

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