NEW YORK (AP) — In your quest to find a date, a spouse or a hook-up, you might discover something else when using dating apps: new music.

From Madonna to Mariah Carey, an increasing number of acts are looking to platforms like Tinder and Match to promote their music and reach their fans on-the-go. Madonna’s latest album was advertised on Grindr, an app for gay men, while Jason Derulo looked to Tinder to debut a music video.

Carey launched a profile on Match.com to premiere her music video for the single, “Infinity,” and last week DJ-producer Afrojack took over Match’s Twitter account for eight hours to answer questions about love and relationships while promoting his new single, “SummerThing!”

“You want to go where your fans are, where your potential fans are. And you can’t just promote on iTunes — you’ve got to think of other ways to reach an audience,” said Joel Simkhai, the founder and CEO of Grindr.

Simkhai said Madonna’s team contacted Grindr about collaborating. They launched a contest around Valentine’s Day where users would change their profile photos to mimic the album cover of “Rebel Heart” — where Madonna’s face is wrapped with wires. Five winners earned a chance to live chat with the pop icon, who released the album in March.

“She was very keen with having chats with actual Grindr users,” Simkhai said. “That was her idea.”

Gay fans have long supported Madonna, who has advocated gay rights for decades. Grindr also worked with Lady Gaga in 2011 when she released “Born This Way,” even providing a link to iTunes to download the No. 1 hit.

Zedd, the Grammy-winning DJ-producer, worked with Tinder to promote his album, “True Colors,” released last month. While searching for suitors, Tinder users would come across Zedd’s promotional profile and if they swiped right — which means “like” — they could purchase the 25-year-old’s album at a discounted price of $3.99 (it currently costs $7.99 on iTunes).

“Music is something that is so woven into the life of millennials, as is meeting new people, that there’s just an incredible amount of overlap between the two,” said Phil Schwarz, Tinder’s head of marketing. “Tinder’s always been talked about as a social discovery app, and I think this is more evidence that this is true.”

“Tinder is where millennials are, and if you combine that with the fact that the platform is highly, highly engaging, you have something really, really powerful,” he added.

Tinder or Interscope Records, Zedd’s label, wouldn’t say how many albums sold on Tinder, but the sales from the app counted toward the 39,000 copies “True Colors” pushed in its first week, helping it debut at No. 4 on the Billboard 200 albums chart.

Schwarz said 85 percent of Tinder users are between the ages 18-34, and the average user spends about 11 minutes on the app each day — one of the main reasons Derulo launched the video for “Want to Want Me,” a Top 5 hit, on Tinder.

“I see this app as the wave of the future. I know my fans will swipe right,” Derulo said in a statement.

PlentyofFish also worked with Derulo when the website appeared in the music video for his song “Ridin Solo” in 2010. The dating service also appeared in Britney Spears, Flo Rida and Kesha’s videos. In addition to finding a place in Gaga’s “Telephone” video, PlentyofFish worked with the star during a U.S. tour, giving fans a chance to win tickets and backstage passes.

Other artists also have found ways to work with dating apps: Hilary Duff, a regular Tinder user for real dates, used the app’s interface in her latest music video, and Limp Bizkit frontman Fred Durst is the director behind recent commercials for eHarmony, the dating service that has worked with Natalie Cole and used her hit, “This Will Be,” in TV and radio ads.

Grindr — which has 2 million active daily users — said the company’s success with music partnerships is leading to more work this summer. After collaborating with Madonna, who has a deal with Live Nation, Grindr is continuing to work with the concert promoter and is expected to launch campaigns with Nicki Minaj and Idina Menzel.

Grindr is also expected to work with Ciara, Jessie J, Disclosure and others through Goldenvoice, the company that created the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival, operates music venues and promotes hundreds of concerts each year.

“This is a win-win for us. Our users are very interested in music, very interested in entertainment,” Simkhai said. “We like to show them things that (are) relevant to them.”

———

This story has been updated with the correct spelling of Phil Schwarz’s last name.

TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — A federal judge on Monday gave a man charged with plotting to bomb an Army installation in support of the Islamic State group more time to review the evidence against him.

U.S. District Judge Carlos Murguia granted a request from John T. Booker Jr.’s public defender for an additional 30 days to review evidence gathered by prosecutors and recently turned over to his attorneys. The judge’s decision postponed a trial that would have started in July under normal guidelines.

Murguia gave Booker’s attorneys until July 29 to file legal motions and set another hearing for Aug. 19. The judge set the dates after Booker said he understood that the time in between wouldn’t count in assessing whether he was getting a speedy trial, a right guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution.

“If we need more time, we need more time,” Booker told the judge. “I’m not in any rush at all.”

According to court documents, the 20-year-old Topeka resident was arrested in April while trying to arm what he thought was a 1,000-pound bomb inside a van near Fort Riley, about an hour west of Topeka. Booker is charged with attempting to use a weapon of mass destruction, attempting to use an explosive device and attempt to provide material support to a terrorist group. If convicted, he could face life in prison.

Prosecutors have alleged that Booker told an FBI informant he wanted to kill Americans and engage in violent jihad on behalf of the Islamic State group. A Muslim cleric who counseled Booker at the FBI’s request has said he suffers from bipolar disorder.

Booker entered the courtroom in Topeka wearing an orange jumpsuit, still chained at the ankles. He smiled multiple times during his hearing, answering questions with, “sure,” ”yeah,” and “I’m definitely OK with that.” At one point, public defender Melody Evans quietly urged him to reply to the judge with, “Yes, sir.”

Murguia appeared by video from a courtroom in Kansas City, Kansas.

———

Follow John Hanna on Twitter at https://twitter.com/apjdhanna .

April 18, 2010 — U.S. and Iraqi forces kill two top leaders of al-Qaida’s branch in Iraq. Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi becomes the terror group’s new leader.

March 2011 — Syrian conflict erupts following an uprising against President Bashar Assad that turns into an insurgency and eventually civil war, attracting scores of al-Qaida militants from Iraq.

April 2013 — Al-Baghdadi announces his group has taken over the Nusra Front, the al-Qaida affiliate in Syria. The combined group is variously called the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, or ISIL, and the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, or ISIS; eventually it is known as the Islamic State group. Nusra denies the takeover, sparking infighting that continues to this day.

March 5, 2013 — Rebel factions including the Nusra Front take over Raqqa, a provincial capital in north-central Syria, the largest city to be wrested from Assad’s government by rebels.

May 2013 — IS fighters burst on stage and show their strength by shooting three peoples in a main square in Raqqa. The group begins seizing towns and villages across northern Syria.

January 2014 — Al-Baghdadi’s forces sweep into Fallujah and parts of Ramadi in Iraq’s Anbar province, which Iraqi security forces had abandoned weeks earlier. In Syria, they seize full control of Raqqa after driving out rival groups. Infighting with rivals erupts across north and eastern Syria.

June 10, 2014 — Al-Baghdadi’s fighters take over Iraq’s second-largest city of Mosul and, the next day, overrun more of Nineveh province, including the village of Eski Mosul. They soon sweep south, capturing Saddam Hussein’s hometown of Tikrit and much of the Sunni heartland nearly to the outskirts of Baghdad as government forces melt away. When they threaten Shiite holy sites, Iraq’s top Shiite cleric issues a call to arms against the group, bringing a flood of volunteers to militias.

June 29, 2014 — The IS group declares the establishment of a “caliphate,” or Islamic state, in territories it controls in Iraq and Syria, and al-Baghdadi is declared the caliph. The militants rename themselves the Islamic State group. To celebrate, the militants “unite” the territories by knocking down sand berms in the desert that mark the border between the two countries. They soon after seize several actual border crossings.

Aug. 8, 2014 — The U.S. begins targeting the IS group with airstrikes, citing the humanitarian plight of Iraq’s minorities, like the Yazidis.

Aug. 19, 2014 — IS releases a video showing the beheading of American journalist James Foley in response to the U.S.-led airstrikes. This marks the first of many videos showing militants beheading foreign captives.

Jan. 23, 2015 — Kurdish peshmerga fighters regain control of Eski Mosul and several neighboring towns, driving out IS fighters.

Jan. 26, 2015 — Kurdish fighters take control of the Syrian border town of Kobani near Turkey after fighting IS militants for months. U.S.-led airstrikes helped turn the tide for the Kurds.

Feb. 3, 2015 — IS releases a video of Jordanian pilot Muath al-Kaseasbeh being burned to death inside a cage.

April 1, 2015 — Backed by U.S.-led coalition airstrikes, Iraqi forces retake the city of Tikrit, their biggest gain yet against the IS group.

May 17, 2015 — Ramadi, the capital of Iraq’s Anbar province, falls to IS as Iraqi forces abandon their weapons and armored vehicles to flee.

May 20, 2015 — IS captures the historic desert city of Palmyra in central Syria after Assad’s forces collapse and withdraw.

June 16, 2015 — Kurds deal the Islamic State a major setback by capturing the Syrian town of Tal Abyad on the Turkish border, which had provided a strategic supply route to IS.

ESKI MOSUL, Iraq (AP) — When the Islamic State fighters burst into the Iraqi village of Eski Mosul, Sheikh Abdullah Ibrahim knew his wife was in trouble.

Buthaina Ibrahim was an outspoken human rights advocate who had once run for the provincial council in Mosul. The IS fighters demanded she apply for a “repentance card.” Under the rule of the extremist group, all former police officers, soldiers and people whose activities are deemed “heretical” must sign the card and carry it with them at all times.

“She said she’d never stoop so low,” her husband said.

Buthaina Ibrahim was an outlier in her defiance of the Islamic State. It would cost her dearly.

The “caliphate,” declared a year ago, demands obedience. Untold numbers have been killed because they were deemed dangerous to the IS, or insufficiently pious; 5-8 million endure a regime that has swiftly turned their world upside down, extending its control into every corner of life to enforce its own radical interpretation of Islamic law, or Shariah.

The Islamic State is a place where men douse themselves with cologne to hide the odor of forbidden cigarettes; where taxi drivers or motorists usually play the IS radio station, since music can get a driver 10 lashes; where women must be entirely covered, in black, and in flat-soled shoes; where shops must close during Muslim prayers, and everyone found outdoors must attend.

There is no safe way out. People vanish — their disappearance sometimes explained by an uninformative death certificate, or worse, a video of their beheading.

“People hate them, but they’ve despaired, and they don’t see anyone supporting them if they rise up,” said a 28-year-old Syrian who asked to be identified only by the nickname he uses in political activism, Adnan, in order to protect his family, which still lives under IS rule. “People feel that nobody is with them.”

The Associated Press interviewed more than 20 Iraqis and Syrians describing life under the group’s rule. One AP team travelled to Eski Mosul, a village on a bend in the Tigris River north of Mosul where residents emerged from nearly seven months under IS rule after Kurdish fighters drove the extremists out in January. IS forces remain dug in only a few miles away, so close that smoke is visible from fighting on the front lines.

Another AP team travelled to the Turkish border cities of Gaziantep and Sanliurfa, refuges for Syrians who have fled IS territory.

The picture they paint suggests the Islamic State’s “caliphate” has evolved into an entrenched pseudo-state, based on a bureaucracy of terror. Interviewees provided AP with some documents produced by the IS ruling machine — repentance cards, lists inventorying weapons held by local fighters, leaflets detailing rules of women’s dress, detailed forms for applying for permission to travel outside IS territory. All emblazoned with the IS black banner and logo “Caliphate in the path of the prophet.”

Adnan described the transformation that the Syrian city of Raqqa underwent after the Islamic State took it over in January 2014. At the time, he fled, but after a few months of missing his family, the 28-year-old returned to see if he could endure life under the extremists. He lasted for almost a year in the city, now the IS de facto capital. He spoke to AP in the Turkish border town of Gaziantep.

The once colorful, cosmopolitan Syrian provincial capital has been transformed, he said. Now, women covered head to toe in black scurried quickly to markets before rushing home. Families often didn’t leave home to avoid any contact with the “Hisba” committees, the dreaded enforcers of the innumerable IS regulations.

IS fighters turned a soccer stadium into a prison and interrogation center, known as “Point 11.” The city’s central square was referred to by residents as “Jaheem” Square — Hell Square, an execution site where Adnan said he saw the corpses of three men left dangling for days as a warning.

Armed members of the Hisba patrolled the streets, cruising in SUVs and wearing Afghan-style baggy pants and long shirts. They sniffed people for the odor of cigarettes, and chastised women they considered improperly covered or men who wore Western clothes or hair styles. Adnan said he once was dealt 10 lashes for playing music in his car.

In this world, the outspoken Buthaina Ibrahim was clearly in danger. The sheikh tried to save his wife, sending her away to safety, but she soon returned, missing their three daughters and two sons, he said. In early October, the militants surrounded the house and dragged her away.

Not long after, Ibrahim received the death certificate. A simple sheet of paper from an “Islamic court” with a judge’s signature, it said only that Buthaina’s death was verified, nothing more. He has no idea where her body is.

Delivery from IS came to Eski Mosul at the hands of Kurdish fighters. Amid the joy over liberation, many residents discarded documents from the Islamic State.

But Ibrahim is keeping the death certificate as a connection to his wife, “because it has her name on it.”

A former soldier in the village, Salim Ahmed, said he is keeping his repentance card. IS might be gone, but the fear it instilled in him is not.

“We live very close to their front line,” he said. “One day, they might come back and ask me for my repentance card again.”

LONDON (AP) — The Latest from Wimbledon (all times local):

———

5:35 p.m.

Lleyton Hewitt has played his last match at Wimbledon.

The 2002 champion at the All England Club lost his opening match at this year’s tournament, falling to Jarkko Nieminen 3-6, 6-3, 4-6, 6-0, 11-9 Monday in exactly 4 hours.

Hewitt, a former top-ranked player from Australia, won the title the year before Roger Federer started his run of five straight championships. He has said he will retire from the sport after next year’s Australian Open.

Since Hewitt won 13 years ago, only Federer, Rafael Nadal, Novak Djokovic and Andy Murray have won the grass-court major.

———

4:55 p.m.

Maria Sharapova has advanced to the second round.

The fourth-seeded Russian, the 2004 Wimbledon champion, beat Johanna Konta of Britain 6-2, 6-2 Monday.

Although Sharapova won her first major title on the grass in southwest London, she has struggled at Wimbledon. In seven of the past eight years, Sharapova has failed to reach the quarterfinals at the All England Club.

———

3:50 p.m.

Even with Wimbledon on his mind, Nick Kyrgios made time to watch the NBA Finals.

The Australian is a big basketball fan, but definitely not a fan of the Golden State Warriors.

Kyrgios said he wouldn’t talk about the NBA champions because “I don’t really like the Warriors.” But he did have plenty of nice things to say about LeBron James.

Kyrgios said James is, “hands down, the best player in the world. I think any person looks up to him.”

———

3:35 p.m.

Just after he won his opening match at Wimbledon, Novak Djokovic summed up what the All England Club means to him.

“This is the cradle of our sport, Centre Court,” Djokovic said, “it doesn’t get any better than Wimbledon.”

Djokovic beat Philipp Kohlschreiber of Germany in straight sets on the opening day of the tournament, playing the first match in the main stadium.

Last year, Djokovic won his second Wimbledon title on the same Centre Court, beating seven-time champion Roger Federer in straight sets.

———

3:25 p.m.

John Isner’s serve is in fine form to start Wimbledon, where his career winning percentage is now back to .500.

The 17th-seeded American — best known for winning the longest match in tennis history at the All England Club in 2010 — hit 38 aces in a 7-6 (5), 6-4, 6-4 victory over 91st-ranked Go Soeda of Japan in the first round Monday.

Isner collected more than half of his points, 58 of 96, via unreturned serves.

The match only took 1 hour, 45 minutes — a sprint for Isner, who famously edged Nicolas Mahut 70-68 in the fifth set of a first-rounder five years ago that lasted more than 11 hours spread over three days.

Isner never has been past the third round at Wimbledon in six previous trips and is now 6-6 at the grass-court Grand Slam tournament.

———

3:15 p.m.

Wimbledon’s defending champion is through to the second round.

Novak Djokovic beat Philipp Kohlschreiber of Germany 6-4, 6-4, 6-4 Monday in the first round, playing the first match of the tournament on Centre Court.

Djokovic, who won the Australian Open this year and then lost in the French Open final, is the man to beat at the All England Club again this year. The top-seeded Serb won his second Wimbledon title last year, and came into this year’s tournament with a 41-3 record.

———

2:35 p.m.

Serena Williams was far from dominant at the start, but more than good enough at the end.

The top-seeded American opened her quest for a true Grand Slam with a 6-4, 6-1 win over Margarita Gasparyan of Russia on Monday in the first round of Wimbledon.

Williams has won three straight major titles, including the Australian Open and French Open. If she wins the title at the All England Club and then defends her title at the U.S. Open, she would be the first player since Steffi Graf in 1988 to win all four Grand Slam titles in the same season.

Williams started slow on the grass on Court 1, trailing 3-1 before turning things around and advancing to the second round.

———

1:50 p.m.

Serena Williams is a half-hour into Wilmbledon and she’s already getting warned to watch her language.

In the sixth game of her first-round match against Margarita Gasparyan of Russia, a qualifier ranked 113th, Williams slid on the grass and fell during a point. After the next point, a lineswoman trotted over to the chair umpire, who announced: “Code violation, audible obscenity, Miss Williams.”

Williams glared at the lineswoman as she went back over to her position behind the baseline.

Williams, who has a 21-match Grand Slam winning streak, trailed 3-1 before taking three games in a row.

———

12:50 p.m.

Victoria Azarenka is the first player to reach the second round of Wimbledon.

The 23rd-seeded Belarussian, a two-time Australian Open champion, beat Anett Kontaveit of Estonia 6-2, 6-1 on Court No. 12.

———

12:45 p.m.

Nick Kyrgios hit it right on the head — on the head of a linesman, that is.

The 26th-seeded Australian was hitting back to the ball boy during his opening match at Wimbledon on Monday when he sent an errant shot toward the corner of the court that bounced off the top of the head of an unsuspecting linesman.

The linesman wasn’t hurt, and he and Kyrgios soon shared a laugh with the crowd. The linesman then wiped his brow and Kyrgios got back to work against Diego Schwartzman, jumping out to a 6-0, 6-2 lead.

Take a look at the video: http://clips.wimbledon.com/g/v/ae7vG2jHkDS

———

12:05 p.m.

Rain shouldn’t be problem on the opening day at the All England Club.

Play has already started at Wimbledon, with some sun sneaking through the gray clouds overhead.

The dry weather and warm temperatures are expected to stay well into the first week.

———

11:15 a.m.

Day 1 at Wimbledon is upon us, and Novak Djokovic is first up on Centre Court.

The defending champion from Serbia will take to the grass at about 1 p.m., but it will be no walk in the park against Philipp Kohlschreiber of Germany.

Djokovic won his second title at Wimbledon last year, beating seven-time champion Roger Federer in five sets. The two could meet in the final again this year.

Stan Wawrinka, who beat Djokovic this month in the French Open final, is also scheduled to play on Centre Court, taking on Joao Sousa of Portugal.

In the women’s draw, top-seeded Serena Williams will continue her bid for a true Grand Slam by taking on Margarita Gasparyan of Russia on Court No. 1. Maria Sharapova, the 2004 champion at the All England Club, will be up against Johanna Konta of Britain in the main stadium.

LONDON (AP) — The Latest from Wimbledon (all times local):

———

5:35 p.m.

Lleyton Hewitt has played his last match at Wimbledon.

The 2002 champion at the All England Club lost his opening match at this year’s tournament, falling to Jarkko Nieminen 3-6, 6-3, 4-6, 6-0, 11-9 Monday in exactly 4 hours.

Hewitt, a former top-ranked player from Australia, won the title the year before Roger Federer started his run of five straight championships. He has said he will retire from the sport after next year’s Australian Open.

Since Hewitt won 13 years ago, only Federer, Rafael Nadal, Novak Djokovic and Andy Murray have won the grass-court major.

———

4:55 p.m.

Maria Sharapova has advanced to the second round.

The fourth-seeded Russian, the 2004 Wimbledon champion, beat Johanna Konta of Britain 6-2, 6-2 Monday.

Although Sharapova won her first major title on the grass in southwest London, she has struggled at Wimbledon. In seven of the past eight years, Sharapova has failed to reach the quarterfinals at the All England Club.

———

3:50 p.m.

Even with Wimbledon on his mind, Nick Kyrgios made time to watch the NBA Finals.

The Australian is a big basketball fan, but definitely not a fan of the Golden State Warriors.

Kyrgios said he wouldn’t talk about the NBA champions because “I don’t really like the Warriors.” But he did have plenty of nice things to say about LeBron James.

Kyrgios said James is, “hands down, the best player in the world. I think any person looks up to him.”

———

3:35 p.m.

Just after he won his opening match at Wimbledon, Novak Djokovic summed up what the All England Club means to him.

“This is the cradle of our sport, Centre Court,” Djokovic said, “it doesn’t get any better than Wimbledon.”

Djokovic beat Philipp Kohlschreiber of Germany in straight sets on the opening day of the tournament, playing the first match in the main stadium.

Last year, Djokovic won his second Wimbledon title on the same Centre Court, beating seven-time champion Roger Federer in straight sets.

———

3:25 p.m.

John Isner’s serve is in fine form to start Wimbledon, where his career winning percentage is now back to .500.

The 17th-seeded American — best known for winning the longest match in tennis history at the All England Club in 2010 — hit 38 aces in a 7-6 (5), 6-4, 6-4 victory over 91st-ranked Go Soeda of Japan in the first round Monday.

Isner collected more than half of his points, 58 of 96, via unreturned serves.

The match only took 1 hour, 45 minutes — a sprint for Isner, who famously edged Nicolas Mahut 70-68 in the fifth set of a first-rounder five years ago that lasted more than 11 hours spread over three days.

Isner never has been past the third round at Wimbledon in six previous trips and is now 6-6 at the grass-court Grand Slam tournament.

———

3:15 p.m.

Wimbledon’s defending champion is through to the second round.

Novak Djokovic beat Philipp Kohlschreiber of Germany 6-4, 6-4, 6-4 Monday in the first round, playing the first match of the tournament on Centre Court.

Djokovic, who won the Australian Open this year and then lost in the French Open final, is the man to beat at the All England Club again this year. The top-seeded Serb won his second Wimbledon title last year, and came into this year’s tournament with a 41-3 record.

———

2:35 p.m.

Serena Williams was far from dominant at the start, but more than good enough at the end.

The top-seeded American opened her quest for a true Grand Slam with a 6-4, 6-1 win over Margarita Gasparyan of Russia on Monday in the first round of Wimbledon.

Williams has won three straight major titles, including the Australian Open and French Open. If she wins the title at the All England Club and then defends her title at the U.S. Open, she would be the first player since Steffi Graf in 1988 to win all four Grand Slam titles in the same season.

Williams started slow on the grass on Court 1, trailing 3-1 before turning things around and advancing to the second round.

———

1:50 p.m.

Serena Williams is a half-hour into Wilmbledon and she’s already getting warned to watch her language.

In the sixth game of her first-round match against Margarita Gasparyan of Russia, a qualifier ranked 113th, Williams slid on the grass and fell during a point. After the next point, a lineswoman trotted over to the chair umpire, who announced: “Code violation, audible obscenity, Miss Williams.”

Williams glared at the lineswoman as she went back over to her position behind the baseline.

Williams, who has a 21-match Grand Slam winning streak, trailed 3-1 before taking three games in a row.

———

12:50 p.m.

Victoria Azarenka is the first player to reach the second round of Wimbledon.

The 23rd-seeded Belarussian, a two-time Australian Open champion, beat Anett Kontaveit of Estonia 6-2, 6-1 on Court No. 12.

———

12:45 p.m.

Nick Kyrgios hit it right on the head — on the head of a linesman, that is.

The 26th-seeded Australian was hitting back to the ball boy during his opening match at Wimbledon on Monday when he sent an errant shot toward the corner of the court that bounced off the top of the head of an unsuspecting linesman.

The linesman wasn’t hurt, and he and Kyrgios soon shared a laugh with the crowd. The linesman then wiped his brow and Kyrgios got back to work against Diego Schwartzman, jumping out to a 6-0, 6-2 lead.

Take a look at the video: http://clips.wimbledon.com/g/v/ae7vG2jHkDS

———

12:05 p.m.

Rain shouldn’t be problem on the opening day at the All England Club.

Play has already started at Wimbledon, with some sun sneaking through the gray clouds overhead.

The dry weather and warm temperatures are expected to stay well into the first week.

———

11:15 a.m.

Day 1 at Wimbledon is upon us, and Novak Djokovic is first up on Centre Court.

The defending champion from Serbia will take to the grass at about 1 p.m., but it will be no walk in the park against Philipp Kohlschreiber of Germany.

Djokovic won his second title at Wimbledon last year, beating seven-time champion Roger Federer in five sets. The two could meet in the final again this year.

Stan Wawrinka, who beat Djokovic this month in the French Open final, is also scheduled to play on Centre Court, taking on Joao Sousa of Portugal.

In the women’s draw, top-seeded Serena Williams will continue her bid for a true Grand Slam by taking on Margarita Gasparyan of Russia on Court No. 1. Maria Sharapova, the 2004 champion at the All England Club, will be up against Johanna Konta of Britain in the main stadium.