ESKI MOSUL, Iraq (AP) — When the Islamic State fighters burst into the Iraqi village of Eski Mosul, Sheikh Abdullah Ibrahim knew his wife was in trouble.

Buthaina Ibrahim was an outspoken human rights advocate who had once run for the provincial council in Mosul. The IS fighters demanded she apply for a “repentance card.” Under the rule of the extremist group, all former police officers, soldiers and people whose activities are deemed “heretical” must sign the card and carry it with them at all times.

“She said she’d never stoop so low,” her husband said.

Buthaina Ibrahim was an outlier in her defiance of the Islamic State. It would cost her dearly.

The “caliphate,” declared a year ago, demands obedience. Untold numbers have been killed because they were deemed dangerous to the IS, or insufficiently pious; 5-8 million endure a regime that has swiftly turned their world upside down, extending its control into every corner of life to enforce its own radical interpretation of Islamic law, or Shariah.

The Islamic State is a place where men douse themselves with cologne to hide the odor of forbidden cigarettes; where taxi drivers or motorists usually play the IS radio station, since music can get a driver 10 lashes; where women must be entirely covered, in black, and in flat-soled shoes; where shops must close during Muslim prayers, and everyone found outdoors must attend.

There is no safe way out. People vanish — their disappearance sometimes explained by an uninformative death certificate, or worse, a video of their beheading.

“People hate them, but they’ve despaired, and they don’t see anyone supporting them if they rise up,” said a 28-year-old Syrian who asked to be identified only by the nickname he uses in political activism, Adnan, in order to protect his family, which still lives under IS rule. “People feel that nobody is with them.”

The Associated Press interviewed more than 20 Iraqis and Syrians describing life under the group’s rule. One AP team travelled to Eski Mosul, a village on a bend in the Tigris River north of Mosul where residents emerged from nearly seven months under IS rule after Kurdish fighters drove the extremists out in January. IS forces remain dug in only a few miles away, so close that smoke is visible from fighting on the front lines.

Another AP team travelled to the Turkish border cities of Gaziantep and Sanliurfa, refuges for Syrians who have fled IS territory.

The picture they paint suggests the Islamic State’s “caliphate” has evolved into an entrenched pseudo-state, based on a bureaucracy of terror. Interviewees provided AP with some documents produced by the IS ruling machine — repentance cards, lists inventorying weapons held by local fighters, leaflets detailing rules of women’s dress, detailed forms for applying for permission to travel outside IS territory. All emblazoned with the IS black banner and logo “Caliphate in the path of the prophet.”

Adnan described the transformation that the Syrian city of Raqqa underwent after the Islamic State took it over in January 2014. At the time, he fled, but after a few months of missing his family, the 28-year-old returned to see if he could endure life under the extremists. He lasted for almost a year in the city, now the IS de facto capital. He spoke to AP in the Turkish border town of Gaziantep.

The once colorful, cosmopolitan Syrian provincial capital has been transformed, he said. Now, women covered head to toe in black scurried quickly to markets before rushing home. Families often didn’t leave home to avoid any contact with the “Hisba” committees, the dreaded enforcers of the innumerable IS regulations.

IS fighters turned a soccer stadium into a prison and interrogation center, known as “Point 11.” The city’s central square was referred to by residents as “Jaheem” Square — Hell Square, an execution site where Adnan said he saw the corpses of three men left dangling for days as a warning.

Armed members of the Hisba patrolled the streets, cruising in SUVs and wearing Afghan-style baggy pants and long shirts. They sniffed people for the odor of cigarettes, and chastised women they considered improperly covered or men who wore Western clothes or hair styles. Adnan said he once was dealt 10 lashes for playing music in his car.

In this world, the outspoken Buthaina Ibrahim was clearly in danger. The sheikh tried to save his wife, sending her away to safety, but she soon returned, missing their three daughters and two sons, he said. In early October, the militants surrounded the house and dragged her away.

Not long after, Ibrahim received the death certificate. A simple sheet of paper from an “Islamic court” with a judge’s signature, it said only that Buthaina’s death was verified, nothing more. He has no idea where her body is.

Delivery from IS came to Eski Mosul at the hands of Kurdish fighters. Amid the joy over liberation, many residents discarded documents from the Islamic State.

But Ibrahim is keeping the death certificate as a connection to his wife, “because it has her name on it.”

A former soldier in the village, Salim Ahmed, said he is keeping his repentance card. IS might be gone, but the fear it instilled in him is not.

“We live very close to their front line,” he said. “One day, they might come back and ask me for my repentance card again.”

LONDON (AP) — The Latest from Wimbledon (all times local):

———

5:35 p.m.

Lleyton Hewitt has played his last match at Wimbledon.

The 2002 champion at the All England Club lost his opening match at this year’s tournament, falling to Jarkko Nieminen 3-6, 6-3, 4-6, 6-0, 11-9 Monday in exactly 4 hours.

Hewitt, a former top-ranked player from Australia, won the title the year before Roger Federer started his run of five straight championships. He has said he will retire from the sport after next year’s Australian Open.

Since Hewitt won 13 years ago, only Federer, Rafael Nadal, Novak Djokovic and Andy Murray have won the grass-court major.

———

4:55 p.m.

Maria Sharapova has advanced to the second round.

The fourth-seeded Russian, the 2004 Wimbledon champion, beat Johanna Konta of Britain 6-2, 6-2 Monday.

Although Sharapova won her first major title on the grass in southwest London, she has struggled at Wimbledon. In seven of the past eight years, Sharapova has failed to reach the quarterfinals at the All England Club.

———

3:50 p.m.

Even with Wimbledon on his mind, Nick Kyrgios made time to watch the NBA Finals.

The Australian is a big basketball fan, but definitely not a fan of the Golden State Warriors.

Kyrgios said he wouldn’t talk about the NBA champions because “I don’t really like the Warriors.” But he did have plenty of nice things to say about LeBron James.

Kyrgios said James is, “hands down, the best player in the world. I think any person looks up to him.”

———

3:35 p.m.

Just after he won his opening match at Wimbledon, Novak Djokovic summed up what the All England Club means to him.

“This is the cradle of our sport, Centre Court,” Djokovic said, “it doesn’t get any better than Wimbledon.”

Djokovic beat Philipp Kohlschreiber of Germany in straight sets on the opening day of the tournament, playing the first match in the main stadium.

Last year, Djokovic won his second Wimbledon title on the same Centre Court, beating seven-time champion Roger Federer in straight sets.

———

3:25 p.m.

John Isner’s serve is in fine form to start Wimbledon, where his career winning percentage is now back to .500.

The 17th-seeded American — best known for winning the longest match in tennis history at the All England Club in 2010 — hit 38 aces in a 7-6 (5), 6-4, 6-4 victory over 91st-ranked Go Soeda of Japan in the first round Monday.

Isner collected more than half of his points, 58 of 96, via unreturned serves.

The match only took 1 hour, 45 minutes — a sprint for Isner, who famously edged Nicolas Mahut 70-68 in the fifth set of a first-rounder five years ago that lasted more than 11 hours spread over three days.

Isner never has been past the third round at Wimbledon in six previous trips and is now 6-6 at the grass-court Grand Slam tournament.

———

3:15 p.m.

Wimbledon’s defending champion is through to the second round.

Novak Djokovic beat Philipp Kohlschreiber of Germany 6-4, 6-4, 6-4 Monday in the first round, playing the first match of the tournament on Centre Court.

Djokovic, who won the Australian Open this year and then lost in the French Open final, is the man to beat at the All England Club again this year. The top-seeded Serb won his second Wimbledon title last year, and came into this year’s tournament with a 41-3 record.

———

2:35 p.m.

Serena Williams was far from dominant at the start, but more than good enough at the end.

The top-seeded American opened her quest for a true Grand Slam with a 6-4, 6-1 win over Margarita Gasparyan of Russia on Monday in the first round of Wimbledon.

Williams has won three straight major titles, including the Australian Open and French Open. If she wins the title at the All England Club and then defends her title at the U.S. Open, she would be the first player since Steffi Graf in 1988 to win all four Grand Slam titles in the same season.

Williams started slow on the grass on Court 1, trailing 3-1 before turning things around and advancing to the second round.

———

1:50 p.m.

Serena Williams is a half-hour into Wilmbledon and she’s already getting warned to watch her language.

In the sixth game of her first-round match against Margarita Gasparyan of Russia, a qualifier ranked 113th, Williams slid on the grass and fell during a point. After the next point, a lineswoman trotted over to the chair umpire, who announced: “Code violation, audible obscenity, Miss Williams.”

Williams glared at the lineswoman as she went back over to her position behind the baseline.

Williams, who has a 21-match Grand Slam winning streak, trailed 3-1 before taking three games in a row.

———

12:50 p.m.

Victoria Azarenka is the first player to reach the second round of Wimbledon.

The 23rd-seeded Belarussian, a two-time Australian Open champion, beat Anett Kontaveit of Estonia 6-2, 6-1 on Court No. 12.

———

12:45 p.m.

Nick Kyrgios hit it right on the head — on the head of a linesman, that is.

The 26th-seeded Australian was hitting back to the ball boy during his opening match at Wimbledon on Monday when he sent an errant shot toward the corner of the court that bounced off the top of the head of an unsuspecting linesman.

The linesman wasn’t hurt, and he and Kyrgios soon shared a laugh with the crowd. The linesman then wiped his brow and Kyrgios got back to work against Diego Schwartzman, jumping out to a 6-0, 6-2 lead.

Take a look at the video: http://clips.wimbledon.com/g/v/ae7vG2jHkDS

———

12:05 p.m.

Rain shouldn’t be problem on the opening day at the All England Club.

Play has already started at Wimbledon, with some sun sneaking through the gray clouds overhead.

The dry weather and warm temperatures are expected to stay well into the first week.

———

11:15 a.m.

Day 1 at Wimbledon is upon us, and Novak Djokovic is first up on Centre Court.

The defending champion from Serbia will take to the grass at about 1 p.m., but it will be no walk in the park against Philipp Kohlschreiber of Germany.

Djokovic won his second title at Wimbledon last year, beating seven-time champion Roger Federer in five sets. The two could meet in the final again this year.

Stan Wawrinka, who beat Djokovic this month in the French Open final, is also scheduled to play on Centre Court, taking on Joao Sousa of Portugal.

In the women’s draw, top-seeded Serena Williams will continue her bid for a true Grand Slam by taking on Margarita Gasparyan of Russia on Court No. 1. Maria Sharapova, the 2004 champion at the All England Club, will be up against Johanna Konta of Britain in the main stadium.

LONDON (AP) — The Latest from Wimbledon (all times local):

———

5:35 p.m.

Lleyton Hewitt has played his last match at Wimbledon.

The 2002 champion at the All England Club lost his opening match at this year’s tournament, falling to Jarkko Nieminen 3-6, 6-3, 4-6, 6-0, 11-9 Monday in exactly 4 hours.

Hewitt, a former top-ranked player from Australia, won the title the year before Roger Federer started his run of five straight championships. He has said he will retire from the sport after next year’s Australian Open.

Since Hewitt won 13 years ago, only Federer, Rafael Nadal, Novak Djokovic and Andy Murray have won the grass-court major.

———

4:55 p.m.

Maria Sharapova has advanced to the second round.

The fourth-seeded Russian, the 2004 Wimbledon champion, beat Johanna Konta of Britain 6-2, 6-2 Monday.

Although Sharapova won her first major title on the grass in southwest London, she has struggled at Wimbledon. In seven of the past eight years, Sharapova has failed to reach the quarterfinals at the All England Club.

———

3:50 p.m.

Even with Wimbledon on his mind, Nick Kyrgios made time to watch the NBA Finals.

The Australian is a big basketball fan, but definitely not a fan of the Golden State Warriors.

Kyrgios said he wouldn’t talk about the NBA champions because “I don’t really like the Warriors.” But he did have plenty of nice things to say about LeBron James.

Kyrgios said James is, “hands down, the best player in the world. I think any person looks up to him.”

———

3:35 p.m.

Just after he won his opening match at Wimbledon, Novak Djokovic summed up what the All England Club means to him.

“This is the cradle of our sport, Centre Court,” Djokovic said, “it doesn’t get any better than Wimbledon.”

Djokovic beat Philipp Kohlschreiber of Germany in straight sets on the opening day of the tournament, playing the first match in the main stadium.

Last year, Djokovic won his second Wimbledon title on the same Centre Court, beating seven-time champion Roger Federer in straight sets.

———

3:25 p.m.

John Isner’s serve is in fine form to start Wimbledon, where his career winning percentage is now back to .500.

The 17th-seeded American — best known for winning the longest match in tennis history at the All England Club in 2010 — hit 38 aces in a 7-6 (5), 6-4, 6-4 victory over 91st-ranked Go Soeda of Japan in the first round Monday.

Isner collected more than half of his points, 58 of 96, via unreturned serves.

The match only took 1 hour, 45 minutes — a sprint for Isner, who famously edged Nicolas Mahut 70-68 in the fifth set of a first-rounder five years ago that lasted more than 11 hours spread over three days.

Isner never has been past the third round at Wimbledon in six previous trips and is now 6-6 at the grass-court Grand Slam tournament.

———

3:15 p.m.

Wimbledon’s defending champion is through to the second round.

Novak Djokovic beat Philipp Kohlschreiber of Germany 6-4, 6-4, 6-4 Monday in the first round, playing the first match of the tournament on Centre Court.

Djokovic, who won the Australian Open this year and then lost in the French Open final, is the man to beat at the All England Club again this year. The top-seeded Serb won his second Wimbledon title last year, and came into this year’s tournament with a 41-3 record.

———

2:35 p.m.

Serena Williams was far from dominant at the start, but more than good enough at the end.

The top-seeded American opened her quest for a true Grand Slam with a 6-4, 6-1 win over Margarita Gasparyan of Russia on Monday in the first round of Wimbledon.

Williams has won three straight major titles, including the Australian Open and French Open. If she wins the title at the All England Club and then defends her title at the U.S. Open, she would be the first player since Steffi Graf in 1988 to win all four Grand Slam titles in the same season.

Williams started slow on the grass on Court 1, trailing 3-1 before turning things around and advancing to the second round.

———

1:50 p.m.

Serena Williams is a half-hour into Wilmbledon and she’s already getting warned to watch her language.

In the sixth game of her first-round match against Margarita Gasparyan of Russia, a qualifier ranked 113th, Williams slid on the grass and fell during a point. After the next point, a lineswoman trotted over to the chair umpire, who announced: “Code violation, audible obscenity, Miss Williams.”

Williams glared at the lineswoman as she went back over to her position behind the baseline.

Williams, who has a 21-match Grand Slam winning streak, trailed 3-1 before taking three games in a row.

———

12:50 p.m.

Victoria Azarenka is the first player to reach the second round of Wimbledon.

The 23rd-seeded Belarussian, a two-time Australian Open champion, beat Anett Kontaveit of Estonia 6-2, 6-1 on Court No. 12.

———

12:45 p.m.

Nick Kyrgios hit it right on the head — on the head of a linesman, that is.

The 26th-seeded Australian was hitting back to the ball boy during his opening match at Wimbledon on Monday when he sent an errant shot toward the corner of the court that bounced off the top of the head of an unsuspecting linesman.

The linesman wasn’t hurt, and he and Kyrgios soon shared a laugh with the crowd. The linesman then wiped his brow and Kyrgios got back to work against Diego Schwartzman, jumping out to a 6-0, 6-2 lead.

Take a look at the video: http://clips.wimbledon.com/g/v/ae7vG2jHkDS

———

12:05 p.m.

Rain shouldn’t be problem on the opening day at the All England Club.

Play has already started at Wimbledon, with some sun sneaking through the gray clouds overhead.

The dry weather and warm temperatures are expected to stay well into the first week.

———

11:15 a.m.

Day 1 at Wimbledon is upon us, and Novak Djokovic is first up on Centre Court.

The defending champion from Serbia will take to the grass at about 1 p.m., but it will be no walk in the park against Philipp Kohlschreiber of Germany.

Djokovic won his second title at Wimbledon last year, beating seven-time champion Roger Federer in five sets. The two could meet in the final again this year.

Stan Wawrinka, who beat Djokovic this month in the French Open final, is also scheduled to play on Centre Court, taking on Joao Sousa of Portugal.

In the women’s draw, top-seeded Serena Williams will continue her bid for a true Grand Slam by taking on Margarita Gasparyan of Russia on Court No. 1. Maria Sharapova, the 2004 champion at the All England Club, will be up against Johanna Konta of Britain in the main stadium.

WAKEFIELD, R.I. (AP) — A man charged with trespassing at Taylor Swift’s Rhode Island mansion wants the singer to testify on his behalf.

The Westerly Sun (http://bit.ly/1Jt3mV1 ) reports 24-year-old Nicholas Field was back in court Friday.

The Westerly resident was arrested April 14 and charged with willful trespassing at Swift’s beachfront mansion. Field says he wants Swift to be served with a subpoena to appear in court. He says Swift didn’t say to press charges.

Police say surveillance video shows Field approaching the gate at Swift’s property to deliver a letter and poem. They say Field was manipulating the gate when he was arrested.

Field says he wants to see the video, which was not available Friday.

It’s unclear whether Field is being represented by an attorney.

The case was continued to July 10.

BEIRUT (AP) — Fighting between the Islamic State group and the Syrian army in the mainly Kurdish city of Hassakeh has displaced at least 30,000 people, separated families and left some children unaccompanied, a member of an international aid group said Monday.

Sam Duerden, an Iraq-based International Rescue Committee official, said people in the northeastern Syrian city of Hassakeh need food, water, shelter and medical assistance.

The IS group attacked several government-held southern neighborhoods of Hassakeh on Thursday. The fighting has continued since then, leaving dozens dead, according to activists. Until last week, Hassakeh was split between government forces and Kurdish fighters.

Earlier Monday, state news agency SANA said government air strikes killed “large numbers” of IS fighters in Hassakeh. A military official in the city said by telephone that Syrian troops have been making progress. He spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak to the media.

The IS-affiliated Aamaq news agency released a video on Monday showing extremists fighting street battles in Hassakeh. The agency also showed a sports complex captured by IS fighters.

Duerden said via Skype that many people are fleeing to nearby villages and towns, adding that there are at least 10,000 who are staying in schools or community centers.

“It’s a big movement. People have talked about the city basically emptying out,” said Duerden.

He said those fleeing Hassakeh are mainly women and children, and include people already displaced from other warzones. “We’ve also been seeing families split up, separated families, unaccompanied children, since many people had to leave quickly on foot.”

The Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said IS detonated three car bombs in the city over the past two days, killing 12 troops and pro-government gunmen.

Syria’s civil war, now in its fifth year, has killed more than 220,000 people and displaced nearly half the country’s pre-war population of 23 million, including some 7.6 million who have fled to other parts of Syria.

————

Associated Press writer Albert Aji in Damascus, Syria, contributed to this report.

NEW YORK (AP) — Packed planes Less legroom. Fewer frequent flier miles.

Is that all summer travelers can look forward to?

Thankfully, no. Amid the unpleasantness, there are a few bright spots where airlines inject a bit of humanity back into our journey. And with a record 222 million passengers expected to fly on U.S. airlines this summer, we could use any little bit of sympathy.

Here are five things to actually like about flying today:

— Baggage guarantees. The $25 fee to check bags is a fact of life on most airlines. But until recently, only Alaska Airlines thought the extra money should guarantee passengers something in return. Since 2010, the airline has promised that suitcases will be on the carousel within 20 minutes of the plane arriving at the gate. If not, passengers get a $25 voucher for a future flight or 2,500 bonus frequent flier miles. Delta Air Lines copied that policy this year, offering 2,500 bonus miles to existing members of its frequent flier program — but no voucher. Act quickly: Alaska requires you to reach out within two hours of arrival; Delta within three days. And ultimately it’s your stopwatch against the airlines’ — they are the final arbiter of tardiness.

— Suitcase delivery. Speaking of luggage, you can skip the baggage carousel and have your bags delivered straight to your home, office, hotel or any other location within 40 miles of the airport. Yes, the airlines do charge an extra $30 for one bag, $40 for two or $50 for up to eight suitcases. But for some travelers it is worth that extra price. And the bags are supposed to show up within four to six hours. Alaska, American, Delta, JetBlue, Southwest and United offer this service through an outside vendor, Bags VIP.

— Streaming video. Airlines are providing more ways for passengers to be entertained — or at least distracted from the cramped space. The latest innovation: the ability to stream movies and TV shows directly to our tablets and smartphones. Yes, some content does cost money, but there are plenty of free offerings. Alaska, American, Delta, JetBlue, Southwest and United all offer such a service on some — but not all — of their planes. Your best bet to be entertained is on Delta, which offers the service on all but its 50-seat domestic regional jets and on more than half of its international fleet, and on Southwest, which has it on 80 percent of its jets — basically the newest ones. American only offers streaming on jets without individual TVs; United has the service on just 30 percent of its flights. Passengers may also encounter a lack of electrical plugs to charge all these extra devices. Airlines are working to get each passenger their own plug or USB port but they aren’t moving fast enough.

— Food and drinks on demand. Airlines have traditionally controlled when we can eat or drink. Passengers sit waiting for flight attendants to roll the cart down the aisle and then order a beverage or buy a snack knowing that they are unlikely to see the cart for the duration of the trip. Virgin America has a different system. Throughout the flight, passengers can order cookies, chicken sandwiches, margaritas and more on touchscreens in front of them. The airline sells more items and passengers don’t have to wait long for a refill. Perfect for today’s impatient traveler.

— Coat check. So this isn’t going to help with summer vacations but gets points for creativity. JetBlue now offers a coat check at New York’s JFK. Yes, leave your jackets in chilly New York while you jet off to Florida or the Caribbean. The only catch: you need to fly back into JFK, it has to be a domestic flight and it costs $2 a day. Still, this service keeps the overhead bins less crowded and prevents passengers from forgetting jackets in their tropical hotel room closets.

——

Scott Mayerowitz can be reached at http://twitter.com/GlobeTrotScott.