LONDON (AP) — The Latest from Wimbledon (all times local):

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5:35 p.m.

Lleyton Hewitt has played his last match at Wimbledon.

The 2002 champion at the All England Club lost his opening match at this year’s tournament, falling to Jarkko Nieminen 3-6, 6-3, 4-6, 6-0, 11-9 Monday in exactly 4 hours.

Hewitt, a former top-ranked player from Australia, won the title the year before Roger Federer started his run of five straight championships. He has said he will retire from the sport after next year’s Australian Open.

Since Hewitt won 13 years ago, only Federer, Rafael Nadal, Novak Djokovic and Andy Murray have won the grass-court major.

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4:55 p.m.

Maria Sharapova has advanced to the second round.

The fourth-seeded Russian, the 2004 Wimbledon champion, beat Johanna Konta of Britain 6-2, 6-2 Monday.

Although Sharapova won her first major title on the grass in southwest London, she has struggled at Wimbledon. In seven of the past eight years, Sharapova has failed to reach the quarterfinals at the All England Club.

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3:50 p.m.

Even with Wimbledon on his mind, Nick Kyrgios made time to watch the NBA Finals.

The Australian is a big basketball fan, but definitely not a fan of the Golden State Warriors.

Kyrgios said he wouldn’t talk about the NBA champions because “I don’t really like the Warriors.” But he did have plenty of nice things to say about LeBron James.

Kyrgios said James is, “hands down, the best player in the world. I think any person looks up to him.”

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3:35 p.m.

Just after he won his opening match at Wimbledon, Novak Djokovic summed up what the All England Club means to him.

“This is the cradle of our sport, Centre Court,” Djokovic said, “it doesn’t get any better than Wimbledon.”

Djokovic beat Philipp Kohlschreiber of Germany in straight sets on the opening day of the tournament, playing the first match in the main stadium.

Last year, Djokovic won his second Wimbledon title on the same Centre Court, beating seven-time champion Roger Federer in straight sets.

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3:25 p.m.

John Isner’s serve is in fine form to start Wimbledon, where his career winning percentage is now back to .500.

The 17th-seeded American — best known for winning the longest match in tennis history at the All England Club in 2010 — hit 38 aces in a 7-6 (5), 6-4, 6-4 victory over 91st-ranked Go Soeda of Japan in the first round Monday.

Isner collected more than half of his points, 58 of 96, via unreturned serves.

The match only took 1 hour, 45 minutes — a sprint for Isner, who famously edged Nicolas Mahut 70-68 in the fifth set of a first-rounder five years ago that lasted more than 11 hours spread over three days.

Isner never has been past the third round at Wimbledon in six previous trips and is now 6-6 at the grass-court Grand Slam tournament.

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3:15 p.m.

Wimbledon’s defending champion is through to the second round.

Novak Djokovic beat Philipp Kohlschreiber of Germany 6-4, 6-4, 6-4 Monday in the first round, playing the first match of the tournament on Centre Court.

Djokovic, who won the Australian Open this year and then lost in the French Open final, is the man to beat at the All England Club again this year. The top-seeded Serb won his second Wimbledon title last year, and came into this year’s tournament with a 41-3 record.

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2:35 p.m.

Serena Williams was far from dominant at the start, but more than good enough at the end.

The top-seeded American opened her quest for a true Grand Slam with a 6-4, 6-1 win over Margarita Gasparyan of Russia on Monday in the first round of Wimbledon.

Williams has won three straight major titles, including the Australian Open and French Open. If she wins the title at the All England Club and then defends her title at the U.S. Open, she would be the first player since Steffi Graf in 1988 to win all four Grand Slam titles in the same season.

Williams started slow on the grass on Court 1, trailing 3-1 before turning things around and advancing to the second round.

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1:50 p.m.

Serena Williams is a half-hour into Wilmbledon and she’s already getting warned to watch her language.

In the sixth game of her first-round match against Margarita Gasparyan of Russia, a qualifier ranked 113th, Williams slid on the grass and fell during a point. After the next point, a lineswoman trotted over to the chair umpire, who announced: “Code violation, audible obscenity, Miss Williams.”

Williams glared at the lineswoman as she went back over to her position behind the baseline.

Williams, who has a 21-match Grand Slam winning streak, trailed 3-1 before taking three games in a row.

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12:50 p.m.

Victoria Azarenka is the first player to reach the second round of Wimbledon.

The 23rd-seeded Belarussian, a two-time Australian Open champion, beat Anett Kontaveit of Estonia 6-2, 6-1 on Court No. 12.

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12:45 p.m.

Nick Kyrgios hit it right on the head — on the head of a linesman, that is.

The 26th-seeded Australian was hitting back to the ball boy during his opening match at Wimbledon on Monday when he sent an errant shot toward the corner of the court that bounced off the top of the head of an unsuspecting linesman.

The linesman wasn’t hurt, and he and Kyrgios soon shared a laugh with the crowd. The linesman then wiped his brow and Kyrgios got back to work against Diego Schwartzman, jumping out to a 6-0, 6-2 lead.

Take a look at the video: http://clips.wimbledon.com/g/v/ae7vG2jHkDS

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12:05 p.m.

Rain shouldn’t be problem on the opening day at the All England Club.

Play has already started at Wimbledon, with some sun sneaking through the gray clouds overhead.

The dry weather and warm temperatures are expected to stay well into the first week.

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11:15 a.m.

Day 1 at Wimbledon is upon us, and Novak Djokovic is first up on Centre Court.

The defending champion from Serbia will take to the grass at about 1 p.m., but it will be no walk in the park against Philipp Kohlschreiber of Germany.

Djokovic won his second title at Wimbledon last year, beating seven-time champion Roger Federer in five sets. The two could meet in the final again this year.

Stan Wawrinka, who beat Djokovic this month in the French Open final, is also scheduled to play on Centre Court, taking on Joao Sousa of Portugal.

In the women’s draw, top-seeded Serena Williams will continue her bid for a true Grand Slam by taking on Margarita Gasparyan of Russia on Court No. 1. Maria Sharapova, the 2004 champion at the All England Club, will be up against Johanna Konta of Britain in the main stadium.

WAKEFIELD, R.I. (AP) — A man charged with trespassing at Taylor Swift’s Rhode Island mansion wants the singer to testify on his behalf.

The Westerly Sun (http://bit.ly/1Jt3mV1 ) reports 24-year-old Nicholas Field was back in court Friday.

The Westerly resident was arrested April 14 and charged with willful trespassing at Swift’s beachfront mansion. Field says he wants Swift to be served with a subpoena to appear in court. He says Swift didn’t say to press charges.

Police say surveillance video shows Field approaching the gate at Swift’s property to deliver a letter and poem. They say Field was manipulating the gate when he was arrested.

Field says he wants to see the video, which was not available Friday.

It’s unclear whether Field is being represented by an attorney.

The case was continued to July 10.

BEIRUT (AP) — Fighting between the Islamic State group and the Syrian army in the mainly Kurdish city of Hassakeh has displaced at least 30,000 people, separated families and left some children unaccompanied, a member of an international aid group said Monday.

Sam Duerden, an Iraq-based International Rescue Committee official, said people in the northeastern Syrian city of Hassakeh need food, water, shelter and medical assistance.

The IS group attacked several government-held southern neighborhoods of Hassakeh on Thursday. The fighting has continued since then, leaving dozens dead, according to activists. Until last week, Hassakeh was split between government forces and Kurdish fighters.

Earlier Monday, state news agency SANA said government air strikes killed “large numbers” of IS fighters in Hassakeh. A military official in the city said by telephone that Syrian troops have been making progress. He spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak to the media.

The IS-affiliated Aamaq news agency released a video on Monday showing extremists fighting street battles in Hassakeh. The agency also showed a sports complex captured by IS fighters.

Duerden said via Skype that many people are fleeing to nearby villages and towns, adding that there are at least 10,000 who are staying in schools or community centers.

“It’s a big movement. People have talked about the city basically emptying out,” said Duerden.

He said those fleeing Hassakeh are mainly women and children, and include people already displaced from other warzones. “We’ve also been seeing families split up, separated families, unaccompanied children, since many people had to leave quickly on foot.”

The Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said IS detonated three car bombs in the city over the past two days, killing 12 troops and pro-government gunmen.

Syria’s civil war, now in its fifth year, has killed more than 220,000 people and displaced nearly half the country’s pre-war population of 23 million, including some 7.6 million who have fled to other parts of Syria.

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Associated Press writer Albert Aji in Damascus, Syria, contributed to this report.

NEW YORK (AP) — Packed planes Less legroom. Fewer frequent flier miles.

Is that all summer travelers can look forward to?

Thankfully, no. Amid the unpleasantness, there are a few bright spots where airlines inject a bit of humanity back into our journey. And with a record 222 million passengers expected to fly on U.S. airlines this summer, we could use any little bit of sympathy.

Here are five things to actually like about flying today:

— Baggage guarantees. The $25 fee to check bags is a fact of life on most airlines. But until recently, only Alaska Airlines thought the extra money should guarantee passengers something in return. Since 2010, the airline has promised that suitcases will be on the carousel within 20 minutes of the plane arriving at the gate. If not, passengers get a $25 voucher for a future flight or 2,500 bonus frequent flier miles. Delta Air Lines copied that policy this year, offering 2,500 bonus miles to existing members of its frequent flier program — but no voucher. Act quickly: Alaska requires you to reach out within two hours of arrival; Delta within three days. And ultimately it’s your stopwatch against the airlines’ — they are the final arbiter of tardiness.

— Suitcase delivery. Speaking of luggage, you can skip the baggage carousel and have your bags delivered straight to your home, office, hotel or any other location within 40 miles of the airport. Yes, the airlines do charge an extra $30 for one bag, $40 for two or $50 for up to eight suitcases. But for some travelers it is worth that extra price. And the bags are supposed to show up within four to six hours. Alaska, American, Delta, JetBlue, Southwest and United offer this service through an outside vendor, Bags VIP.

— Streaming video. Airlines are providing more ways for passengers to be entertained — or at least distracted from the cramped space. The latest innovation: the ability to stream movies and TV shows directly to our tablets and smartphones. Yes, some content does cost money, but there are plenty of free offerings. Alaska, American, Delta, JetBlue, Southwest and United all offer such a service on some — but not all — of their planes. Your best bet to be entertained is on Delta, which offers the service on all but its 50-seat domestic regional jets and on more than half of its international fleet, and on Southwest, which has it on 80 percent of its jets — basically the newest ones. American only offers streaming on jets without individual TVs; United has the service on just 30 percent of its flights. Passengers may also encounter a lack of electrical plugs to charge all these extra devices. Airlines are working to get each passenger their own plug or USB port but they aren’t moving fast enough.

— Food and drinks on demand. Airlines have traditionally controlled when we can eat or drink. Passengers sit waiting for flight attendants to roll the cart down the aisle and then order a beverage or buy a snack knowing that they are unlikely to see the cart for the duration of the trip. Virgin America has a different system. Throughout the flight, passengers can order cookies, chicken sandwiches, margaritas and more on touchscreens in front of them. The airline sells more items and passengers don’t have to wait long for a refill. Perfect for today’s impatient traveler.

— Coat check. So this isn’t going to help with summer vacations but gets points for creativity. JetBlue now offers a coat check at New York’s JFK. Yes, leave your jackets in chilly New York while you jet off to Florida or the Caribbean. The only catch: you need to fly back into JFK, it has to be a domestic flight and it costs $2 a day. Still, this service keeps the overhead bins less crowded and prevents passengers from forgetting jackets in their tropical hotel room closets.

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Scott Mayerowitz can be reached at http://twitter.com/GlobeTrotScott.

NEW YORK (AP) — Packed planes Less legroom. Fewer frequent flier miles.

Is that all summer travelers can look forward to?

Thankfully, no. Amid the unpleasantness, there are a few bright spots where airlines inject a bit of humanity back into our journey. And with a record 222 million passengers expected to fly on U.S. airlines this summer, we could use any little bit of sympathy.

Here are five things to actually like about flying today:

— Baggage guarantees. The $25 fee to check bags is a fact of life on most airlines. But until recently, only Alaska Airlines thought the extra money should guarantee passengers something in return. Since 2010, the airline has promised that suitcases will be on the carousel within 20 minutes of the plane arriving at the gate. If not, passengers get a $25 voucher for a future flight or 2,500 bonus frequent flier miles. Delta Air Lines copied that policy this year, offering 2,500 bonus miles to existing members of its frequent flier program — but no voucher. Act quickly: Alaska requires you to reach out within two hours of arrival; Delta within three days. And ultimately it’s your stopwatch against the airlines’ — they are the final arbiter of tardiness.

— Suitcase delivery. Speaking of luggage, you can skip the baggage carousel and have your bags delivered straight to your home, office, hotel or any other location within 40 miles of the airport. Yes, the airlines do charge an extra $30 for one bag, $40 for two or $50 for up to eight suitcases. But for some travelers it is worth that extra price. And the bags are supposed to show up within four to six hours. Alaska, American, Delta, JetBlue, Southwest and United offer this service through an outside vendor, Bags VIP.

— Streaming video. Airlines are providing more ways for passengers to be entertained — or at least distracted from the cramped space. The latest innovation: the ability to stream movies and TV shows directly to our tablets and smartphones. Yes, some content does cost money, but there are plenty of free offerings. Alaska, American, Delta, JetBlue, Southwest and United all offer such a service on some — but not all — of their planes. Your best bet to be entertained is on Delta, which offers the service on all but its 50-seat domestic regional jets and on more than half of its international fleet, and on Southwest, which has it on 80 percent of its jets — basically the newest ones. American only offers streaming on jets without individual TVs; United has the service on just 30 percent of its flights. Passengers may also encounter a lack of electrical plugs to charge all these extra devices. Airlines are working to get each passenger their own plug or USB port but they aren’t moving fast enough.

— Food and drinks on demand. Airlines have traditionally controlled when we can eat or drink. Passengers sit waiting for flight attendants to roll the cart down the aisle and then order a beverage or buy a snack knowing that they are unlikely to see the cart for the duration of the trip. Virgin America has a different system. Throughout the flight, passengers can order cookies, chicken sandwiches, margaritas and more on touchscreens in front of them. The airline sells more items and passengers don’t have to wait long for a refill. Perfect for today’s impatient traveler.

— Coat check. So this isn’t going to help with summer vacations but gets points for creativity. JetBlue now offers a coat check at New York’s JFK. Yes, leave your jackets in chilly New York while you jet off to Florida or the Caribbean. The only catch: you need to fly back into JFK, it has to be a domestic flight and it costs $2 a day. Still, this service keeps the overhead bins less crowded and prevents passengers from forgetting jackets in their tropical hotel room closets.

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Scott Mayerowitz can be reached at http://twitter.com/GlobeTrotScott.

SEATTLE (AP) — Race, identity and the masks people wear are the themes explored in a new exhibit of contemporary, multimedia art at the Seattle Art Museum.

The themes feel especially relevant with the recent opening of the show “Disguise: Masks & Global African Art” coming one day after the deadly shooting in Charleston, South Carolina, and a week after the leader of the NAACP in Spokane, Washington, was accused of lying about her race.

But curator Erika Dayla Massaquoi believes this is the kind of exhibit that would have had people talking about race and identity even without the news.

The show isn’t going to hit people over the head with the topics of race and identity, but Massaquoi believes, “People will intuitively get it.” She worked with the museum’s curator of African and Oceanic art, Pamela McClusky, to create the new exhibit.

It showcases masks from the museum’s collection alongside contemporary art, much of it created just for this show by African artists and those of African descent. The show will be traveling to Los Angeles and New York after Seattle.

The exhibit has a heavy emphasis on digital, multimedia and video art. Visitors walk right through some of the installations, giving it an interactive feel. The space is so filled with sights and sounds that some may find it a little overwhelming, while others will enjoy the way the different forms of art interact.

The first big gallery is a mix of styles and genres: Digital screens show electronically modernized versions of the ancient masks from the museum’s collection, flanked by a herd of fake deer wearing masks, which are in turn surrounded by videos, photographs and other three-dimensional art.

Massaquoi calls that the juxtaposition of genres a blurring and says it forces people to shift their focus back and forth and have their frames of reference challenged.

Some of the most interesting work in the show involve performance pieces, either in person or recorded on video.

Music permeates the space. At the end, visitors are invited to create their own soundtrack for the show. Before they get on the elevator to exit the museum, they also can virtually “try on” some masks by taking pictures in mirrors with masks attached.

The show is not intended as a fun-filled children’s museum experience, although there’s plenty here to spark imaginations of all ages.

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If You Go…

DISGUISE: MASKS & GLOBAL AFRICAN ART: Through Sept. 7 at Seattle Art Museum, 1300 First Ave., Seattle, http://www.seattleartmuseum.org/ or 206-654-3100. Open daily except Tuesdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and until 9 p.m. on Thursdays. Adults, $19.50, teens and students, $12.50, children 12 and under, free. Exhibit is scheduled to be at the Fowler Museum at UCLA from Oct. 18, 2015 to March 13, 2016, and the Brooklyn Museum from April 29 to Sept. 18, 2016.