KINGMAN, Arizona (AP) — A third disturbance within four days broke out Saturday in a private prison in Kingman, authorities said.

Units with the Arizona Department of Public Safety and the Mohave County Sheriff’s Office were helping the Department of Corrections with the unrest at Arizona State Prison-Kingman, officials said.

The Department of Corrections says it was asked to assist with a prison riot. Mohave County Sheriff’s Office spokeswoman Jody Schanman told the Arizona Republic that units were called out to the prison.

Inmates in the Hualapai dormitory are “again refusing to comply with directives this afternoon,” Andrew Wilder, spokesman for the Department of Corrections, said in a statement.

Wilder said that “additional staffing and response teams are on site, and positive progress is being made.”

Local law enforcement officers are providing security around the perimeter of the prison, he said.

On Friday, about 700 inmates at the prison were moved to new locations after disturbances on consecutive days left their housing units uninhabitable.

Nine corrections officers suffered minor injuries in the incidents at the prison, which has had a long history of problems. No inmate injuries were reported.

The first disturbance occurred Wednesday at a minimum-security unit, followed by what he described as an unrelated riot Thursday night at a medium-security unit that took several hours to quell, Wilder said.

In 2010, three inmates escaped from the prison after a woman in a getaway car threw cutting tools over the fence and they broke out. The inmates went on a violent crime spree that included the murders of an Oklahoma couple during a camping trip in New Mexico. They were killed, and their bodies were found burned in their trailer. The inmates were caught, tried and received new prison sentences.

The Management and Training Corp. continued to operate the prison despite scathing criticism of its lax security during the escape.

An inmate at the prison — and the minimum-security unit where the disturbance happened this week — was sexually assaulted and beaten at the facility in January and died at a hospital three days later, according to a legal claim filed by his family. The legal action says emergency responders weren’t notified for nearly two hours.

The inmate, Neil Early, was serving a five-year sentence for theft and possession of drug paraphernalia after becoming addicted to heroin and stealing video games.

Arizona houses thousands of inmates in private prisons, and the industry has come under fire for its large donations to Republican politicians.

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — About to be overrun by Germans, a young black lieutenant called in an artillery barrage on his own position, knowing he’d be killed. It was the only way to hold off the enemy.

The sacrifice by 1st Lt. John Fox is one of many endured by the 100,000 African-American service members during World War II and is now the focus of an exhibit at the National World War II Museum in New Orleans.

Titled “Fighting for the Right to Fight: The African American Experience in WWII,” the exhibit runs from July 4 through May 30, 2016. It describes discrimination before and after the war as well as in the military during World War II.

The exhibit also includes an original 8 1/2 -minute video about the famed Tuskegee Airmen and video interviews with 10 veterans, including Rothacker (ROTH-uh-ker) Smith of Huntsville, Alabama who served in the 366th Infantry Regiment.

A Seventh-Day Adventist and conscientious objector to combat, Smith — serving in the same segregated 92nd Infantry Division to which Fox also belonged — was drafted and became a medic. Often Smith was the only African-American on the bus back from town to Camp Stewart, Georgia, on Saturday nights. He remembers being made to sit in the baggage compartment behind the back seats.

Smith was stationed in southern Italy, where his unit guarded airfields, one of many noncombat jobs to which black troops were relegated. But the war’s heavy death toll eventually sent more African-American troops into combat. Smith was assigned to a machine-gun nest in Sommocolonia, Italy, where Fox was a forward observer directing fire for one of the 366th’s artillery units.

By that time, ammunition was running so short in Italy that it was rationed, said John H. Morrow, a University of Georgia history professor and co-chair of the national advisory committee that drew up plans for the exhibit. Smith said that when the sergeant in charge of the machine gun crew called on Christmas Day for a barrage on German artillery, he was told, “We can’t fire until tomorrow morning because we used up our 16 rounds for today.”

The morning of Dec. 26, 1944, a German mortar shell hit the window of the stone house where the machine-gunners and Smith were holed up. Smith was hit in several places, including his right hip, elbow, upper back and cheek. He used his teeth and left hand to bandage the sergeant, who was more severely injured.

Later in the day, as the Germans pressed their attack toward Fox, he made the ultimate sacrifice: he called in artillery fire right on his own position.

Smith knew, from their location, that the guns were American.

“But I didn’t know the significance of it until 50 years later,” he said.

Smith was captured and taken prisoner by the Germans until his release April 29, 1945. Unlike many POWs, he said, he was able to keep all his clothes because they were bloodstained and full of holes. He has donated his long-sleeved, blood-soaked undershirt to the museum.

After helping to defeat the tyranny of Nazi Germany and its allies, black soldiers returned home, expecting a more tolerant nation. Most were deeply disappointed.

“Segregation was still the law of the land, and racism was alive and well,” the museum’s website says. “For many African American veterans, that disappointment became determination to create change. They fought against segregation and discrimination with the same sense of purpose that had defeated the Axis.”

It is no coincidence, the exhibit points out, that many leading figures of the civil rights movements of the 1950s and 1960s were veterans, including Medgar Evers, who became one of Mississippi’s most active civil rights leaders.

In 1995, Smith returned to Sommocolonia with his sons. They saw a memory garden listing the names of Italians killed on the day he was wounded and one American name: Lt. John Fox.

Fox was among seven African Americans awarded the Medal of Honor in 1997 for service during World War II, after President Bill Clinton ordered an investigation of why blacks had not been getting the medal. Five of those medals were loaned to the exhibit, curator Eric Rivet said.

“It’s the first time they’ve been together since they were awarded in 1997,” Rivet said.

KINGMAN, Ariz. (AP) — About 700 inmates at an Arizona prison were being moved to new locations Friday after disturbances on consecutive days left their housing units uninhabitable.

Nine corrections officers suffered minor injuries in the incidents at the privately run Arizona State Prison-Kingman, which has had a long history of problems. No inmate injuries were reported.

The first disturbance occurred Wednesday at a minimum-security unit, followed by what he described as an unrelated riot Thursday night at a medium-security unit that took several hours to quell, Department of Corrections spokesman Andrew Wilder said.

The agency said the riot caused severe property damage to two housing units, but did not elaborate on what it entailed. The prison remained on lockdown Friday as authorities investigate.

The prison holds about 3,500 minimum- and medium-security inmates and is operated by Centerville, Utah-based Management and Training Corp. The injured officers work for the company, which also operates prisons in seven other states.

In Wednesday’s incident, a small group of minimum security inmates were chasing down an inmate when prison staff intervened to stop the assault, Wilder said. The inmates assaulted the officers, and six officers suffered minor injuries, he said.

Most of the inmates complied with staff’s orders to return to housing, but some did not and it took a couple of hours to get the prisoners back to their housing units, Wilder said.

Thursday’s incident involved many more inmates and turned into a full-blown riot involving an unknown number of inmates, he said. It took many hours for prison staff and Department of Corrections officers to bring the situation under control, and the prison wasn’t secured until early Friday morning, Wilder said. Three guards were hurt, authorities said.

“Importantly, the perimeter of the prison was never breached — local law enforcement and DPS provided assistance in manning the security perimeter while corrections personnel dealt with the situation in the housing units,” Wilder said.

Management and Training Corp. spokesman Issa Arnita said in a statement that the second incident began after an inmate became aggressive with an officer for an unknown reason. The disturbance grew and eventually involved two of the five housing units, Arnita said.

Corrections Director Charles Ryan arrived at the facility early Friday morning and remained there into the evening, Wilder said.

In 2010, three inmates escaped from the prison after a woman in a getaway car threw cutting tools over the fence and they broke out. The inmates went on a violent crime spree that included the murders of an Oklahoma couple during a camping trip in New Mexico. They were killed, and their bodies were found burned in their trailer. The inmates were caught, tried and received new prison sentences.

Management and Training Corp. continued to operate the prison despite scathing criticism of its lax security during the escape.

An inmate at the prison — and the minimum-security unit where the disturbance happened this week — was sexually assaulted and beaten at the facility in January and died at a hospital three days later, according to a legal claim filed by his family. The legal action says emergency responders weren’t notified for nearly two hours.

The inmate, Neil Early, was serving a five-year sentence for theft and possession of drug paraphernalia after becoming addicted to heroin and stealing video games.

Arizona houses thousands of inmates in private prisons, and the industry has come under fire for its large donations to Republican politicians.

NEWARK, N.J. (AP) — 2012 GOP nominee Mitt Romney will be hosting two rival Republican presidential contenders at a holiday sleepover Friday evening.

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and Florida Sen. Marco Rubio will both be staying over at Romney’s property in Wolfeboro, New Hampshire, an aide to Romney confirmed.

The aide, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because of what the aide called the private nature of the event, said the former governor and his wife opened their home to the Christie and Rubio families after hearing they would be in town for the holiday weekend. Both candidates are scheduled to march in Wolfeboro’s Fourth of July parade.

Christie, who formally jumped into the race this week, told reporters in New Hampshire Friday that he was grateful for the invitation.

“I suspect there might be a little politics discussed tonight with Mitt and Ann, but me and Mary Pat, and Andrew and Sarah are really happy that Mitt and Ann invited us to stay with them tonight,” he said, according to video posted by NJ.com.

A Rubio spokesman declined to comment.

Romney had considered another run for president in 2016, but announced in January that he’d decided against it. His endorsement is now coveted.

The Washington Post reported Friday night that Romney would meet next week with former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, another GOP contender, at the Bush family compound in Kennebunkport, Maine.

Christie was a top surrogate for Romney’s 2012 campaign and was considered a potential vice presidential contender. But he continues to receive heat in some Republican circles for leaving the trail and embracing President Barack Obama after New Jersey was hit by Superstorm Sandy just before the election.

Christie’s campaign also announced some of its top staffers Friday.

The campaign will be managed by Ken McKay, who formerly worked for the Republican National Committee and Republican Governors Association.

SAN ANTONIO (AP) — Becky Hammon is about to become the first woman to serve as the head coach of an NBA summer league team.

San Antonio announced Friday that Hammon will lead the Spurs during summer league play in Las Vegas. She is entering her second season as an assistant coach for the Spurs.

Spurs video coordinator Will Hardy handle the head-coaching duties for a summer-league entry in Utah.

The Spurs will play at least five games in Las Vegas, starting on July 11. The Utah summer league starts Monday.

Hammon became the first full-time paid female NBA assistant coach last season. An All-Star in the WNBA, she played eight seasons each with the New York Liberty and San Antonio Stars.

MELBOURNE, Australia (AP) — The fog is still lifting off a deserted playing field on the outskirts of this southern Australian city as 10 aspiring college football punters begin their morning drills.

No one watches them practice on a chilly Melbourne day. Soon, they hope, almost all of them will be showing off their skills in front of crowds of more than 100,000 while punting at powerhouse college football programs 10,000 miles away.

Experienced Australian rules football players for many years have considered punting in the National Football League after their pro careers at home. Now more young Australians are training with the Prokick Australia academy with plans to bypass the Australian Football League entirely and go straight to the states for a college scholarship.

The last two Ray Guy Award winners — to the top punter in the country — were born in Australia and trained at Prokick.

Director Nathan Chapman says it’s the education, not the lure of the NFL, that is prompting the latest batch of young Australian rules footballers to switch sports.

Chapman took his shot at the NFL in 2004 after 10 years with topflight AFL clubs Brisbane and Hawthorn. After being signed by the Green Bay Packers, he was cut the week before the start of the season.

On his return to Australia, he decided that college teams offered more opportunities for young Australians.

“When I went over, there was not much happening with Australians and the college system, and because the NFL can sign you today and cut you tomorrow, I thought the better focus was to put kids into college,” Chapman said.

Australian involvement in U.S. college football can be traced back to 1898, when Melbourne Football Club Aussie rules player Patrick O’Dea joined the University of Wisconsin as a fullback. Known to fans as the “Kangaroo Kicker,” O’Dea went on to coach Notre Dame and was inducted into the College Football Hall Of Fame in 1962.

More recently, former AFL players like Ben Graham and Sav Rocca have forged NFL careers and shown that Australian rules can provide an ideal foundation for punting. Now more than 30 Australians are punting for U.S. schools at various levels. Almost all of them worked out at Prokick.

“To be honest, we don’t talk about the NFL much because we want them to focus on getting the degree,” Chapman said.

The exchange of U.S. degrees for Australian punting skills is proving a popular one for many colleges. Tom Hackett at Utah and Tom Hornsey at Memphis were the top punters in the country the past two seasons, changing the game with their rugby-style drop punts and positional play.

The punt-style kick is an integral part of Aussie rules — used to score and pass, as well as kicking for field position. The tumbling flight of an end-over-end kick is effective at finding the sideline, while also proving difficult to catch.

Prokick product Nick Porebski, 22, spent the last two years playing at Utah’s tiny Snow College. This month he moves up to Oregon State on a full scholarship.

Porebski appeared on track for a professional Aussie rules career before a series of shoulder injuries.

“I got a letter from Nathan when I was about 15 or 16 asking if I’d like to try punting. I didn’t really know what it was at the time, so I just continued playing Aussie rules,” he said. “Once I had those injuries, I had another look at the letter and decided I might pursue it and see what happened.”

Michael Dickson, 19, who just earned a scholarship with Texas and plans to study business, also had his sights set on the AFL as a member of the Sydney Swans club’s academy program.

“The opportunities over there are so much better with schooling, and I needed a break from AFL, so this was the perfect opportunity to keep my competitive edge up and get an education,” he said.

Dickson got his first look at the home of the Longhorns when he visited Austin in June. By September, he should be playing in front of wild crowds of 100,119.

“I think I have some idea, but I don’t think it’ll sink in until I get over there,” he said.

Porebski said the cultural differences are as challenging as college football.

“It was definitely very loud. The (American) accents were ringing in my ears the whole time,” he said. “It took me a good two months to get used to the accent. But everything was different. The food, the cars they drive and pretty much the way they go about everything was different.”

As with most Prokick candidates, Dickson and Porebski got their scholarships based purely on video footage and a recommendation from Chapman.

Chapman said it has taken at least eight years to develop trust with college coaches.

“And as coaches transfer from one school to another, they say, ‘We know where I got him from, I’ve gone to a new school, let’s get another one of these Aussie guys,'” he said. “If we’ve sent the right guys over, our reputation then holds.

“Some coaches still can’t take that jump, but there are others who are more than happy.”