bigstock-giant-panda-bear-eating-bamboo-38749159 (1)
ADVERTISEMENT
MORE ARTICLES

Pandamonium!

Most people have heard that panda bears, an endangered species native to China, eat bamboo. But did you realize that 99% of panda’s diet is bamboo?

Learn more fun facts about the panda in the quiz below, and feel like a member of the panda paparazzi with the up close images of some of the world’s most famous bears.

Panda Bears

Get the facts on these black and white wonders.

gal-panda-surveillance.jpg

In this photo taken with a surveillance camera and provided by the Schoenbrunn Zoo, female giant panda Yang Yang holds her newborn cub in her mouth in an enclosed compound in Vienna, on Monday, Aug. 23, 2010. Yang Yang gave birth to her second cub on the third birthday of her first baby - called Fu Long - who has since left for China. (AP Photo/Schoenbrunn Zoo, Handout)

gal-panda-bambo.jpg

In this March 15, 2004 file photo, released by China's Xinhua News Agency, Hua Mei, an American-born giant panda, eats bamboo at the Wolong Nature Reserve in Chengdu, southwest China's Sichuan Province. Hua Mei gave birth to her eighth cub on Friday, Sept. 17, 2010, in southwest China, a rare accomplishment for the endangered species known for being poor breeders. (AP Photo/Xinhua,Chen Xie, File)

gal-tian-tian.jpg

Tian Tian, one of the National Zoo's pandas, appears to wipe his face while eating a fruit popsicle on a warm summer day at the zoo in Washington, on Wednesday, July 7, 2010. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

gal-bamboo-canopy.jpg

Under a canopy of bamboo, Mei Xiang, one of the National Zoo's pandas, eats a fruit popsicle on a warm summer day in Washington, on Wednesday, July 7, 2010. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

gal-mei-xang-snow.jpg

Mei Xiang, mother of 4-year-old panda Tai Shan, rolls herself down a snowy hill on Tai Shan's last day at the National Zoo in Washington, on Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2010. Tai Shan, who was born at the zoo in 2005, will be sent to China on Thursday to become part of a breeding program. Under the Smithsonian's panda loan agreement, any cub born at the zoo must be returned to China for breeding. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

gal-sneaky-panda.jpg

Panda Tai Shan, 4, is seen on his last day at the National Zoo in Washington, on Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2010. Tai Shan, who was born at the zoo in 2005, will be sent to China on Thursday to become part of a breeding program. Under the Smithsonian's panda loan agreement, any cub born at the zoo must be returned to China for breeding. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

gal-tai-shan-climbs.jpg

In this July 6, 2007 file photo, The National Zoo's only giant panda cub, Tai Shan, climbs a tree in Washington. Tai Shan will be arriving in China along with 3-year-old Mei Lan on Friday, Feb. 5, 2010. Under a deal between China and the U.S., all giant pandas originally from China are only lent out to foreign zoos for scientific study for several years. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)

gal-tai-shang-eats.jpg

Visitors look at the American-born panda Tai Shan at the Ya'an Bifeng Gorge Breeding Base in Sichuan province, China, Tuesday, March 9, 2010. Freed from quarantine, Tai Shan paced around his new home in southwest China as he was put on public display Tuesday for the first time since his much-anticipated arrival in the country. (AP Photo)

gal-many-pandas.jpg

In this Jan. 28, 2010 file photo, panda cubs from the Wolong Giant Panda Reserve Center in Sichuan are seen at a Shanghai zoo in China. Japanese panda fans will be able to see the endangered animals in Tokyo next year for the first time since 2008, after the city reached an agreement to pay nearly $1 million a year to borrow a pair from China, officials said Friday, Feb. 12. Tokyo's Ueno Zoo has been without a giant panda for the first time since 1972, when a pair arrived to mark the signing of a peace treaty between Japan and China. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko, File)

gal-tiny-panda.jpg

This picture taken on Tuesday, Sept. 7, 2010, and released on Wednesday, Sept. 8, 2010, shows a person feeding one of the two giant panda cubs born at Madrid's Zoo on Sept. 7, 2010. An artificially inseminated female giant panda named Hua Zui Ba gave birth to the two panda cubs. (AP Photo/Spanish National Research Council)

One American got the chance to work with Panda bears in China.

3 comments on “Pandamonium!

  1. Sarah

    We should do all we can to help save these ADORABLE pandas. We already have so many endangered species, if we save one, that could lead to more.(:

    Reply
  2. Sarah :D

    Pandas need to be saved i mean their like one of the most adorable creatures ever! plus my best friend said if pandas become extinct so will she!!!

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>