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Predict the Weather

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First check out the photo gallery to see different clouds and the kind of weather each predicts. Then test your skills with the quiz to see how good you are at forecasting the weather.

Sources: U.S. Army Survival Manual FM 21-76, NOAA, NASA  

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How to spot cirrus clouds: Thin, wispy clouds high in the sky

What they mean: Fair weather. Exception: In a cold climate if a lot of them show up quickly accompanied by winds from the north, it could mean an approaching blizzard

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How to spot cumulus clouds: Puffy, fluffy and white. Usually show up on sunny days

What they mean: Fair weather if they're isolated. A storm's on the way if they gather and rise in the afternoon

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How to spot stratus clouds: Low, gray even layer across the whole sky

What they mean: Rain's coming

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How to spot cumulonimbus clouds: Huge formations of cumulus clouds, oftentimes anvil-shaped with flat, dark bottoms and fluffy white tops

What they mean: Thunderstorms are imminent if they're moving in your direction

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How to spot cirrostratus clouds: High and wispy. Slightly darker than cirrus clouds

What they mean: Good weather

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How to spot cirrocumulus clouds: Small, white, round clouds high in the sky

What they mean: Good weather

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How to spot scuds: Vapory and fast-moving. In this photo, they're directly above the tree tops

What they mean: Continued bad weather

This group of teens spent their summer getting the forecast on a career in meteorology.

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Another perspective on global warming.

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