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Date
March 27, 2012

The Mariana Trench

Director James Cameron dives to the deepest point on earth.
Transcript

“Alright, buddy.”

Gary: It was a journey to the deepest place on the planet.

“Have fun.

“Exactly.”

Gary: Fun. But the danger was very real as movie director and explorer James Cameron began his solo journey seven miles down to the lowest part of the ocean called Challenger Deep. It is located in the Mariana Trench. That is a part of the ocean floor in the western Pacific, near Guam and east of the Phillipines.

Cameron’s journey took him deeper than where a nuclear submarine typically travels down into the dark where light can’t penetrate. Deeper than where whales can swim. And far below the depth of the wreckage of the Titanic. He descended lower than the height of mount everest, going down another mile still before finally hitting the ocean floor. Once there, Cameron took to Twitter to share the news with the world. He tweeted, “Just arrived at the ocean’s deepest point. Hitting bottom never felt so good. Can’t wait to share what I’m seeing with you.”

The deep sea is the most unexplored area on the planet. Temperatures are barely above freezing and the pressure is a thousand times that at sea level. That is why Cameron descended in a specially designed sub. Even a slight crack in the vessel would be deadly.

Cameron surfaced after spending about three hours on the sea floor collecting samples for scientific study and footage for a documentary.

James Cameron: It was bleak. It looked like the moon. I was thinking, man, this was a long way down.

Gary: Cameron became the first human to reach the bottom alone. It is been more than fifty years since a team of divers explored the Challenger Deep.

Cameron: Man, it is a heck of a ride. You are screaming down and screaming back up.

Gary: There has been a recent push to explore more of the deep sea, hoping to find new sources of food and even renewable energy.

Cameron hopes his expedition will spark even more exploration.

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