Google is helping to promote the fight against extremism through its own digital advertising network.

Anti-extremist ads partially financed by Google recently began appearing in the U.K. as part of a program that helps nonprofit organizations highlight their causes when people enter certain words into a search engine.

In this instance, Google says it is providing a “handful” of nonprofits with $10,000 apiece to buy such ads. These ads may appear alongside search results when a search request hints at an interest in extremists such as the Islamic State group.

It comes at a time when Google, Facebook, Twitter and other Internet companies are under more pressure to counter the use of online services by the Islamic State and other extremists to recruit supporters.

Google, a subsidiary of Alphabet Inc., hasn’t decided yet whether to extend its financing of anti-extremist ads to the U.S.

It’s up to each participating nonprofit to decide which search terms should be linked to its ads and how much it’s willing to bid for the right to have the messages appear alongside the results. Google’s financing won’t affect the formula that’s used to determine the rankings of websites in the non-commercial area where its main search results appear.

The funding of anti-extremist ads is part of a grants program that Google started more than a decade ago. In the past, Google has provided funding for nonprofit groups to buy ads promoting animal rescue efforts and the fight against hunger.

— Michael Liedtke, AP Technology Writer

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Verizon is exempting its go90 mobile video service from data limits it imposes on most users.

Verizon spokeswoman Deidre Hart says the go90 business is paying the Verizon Wireless business for the data use “on the same terms as any third party” so that customers can watch shows and clips for free. It’s part of the “FreeBee” sponsored-data program that Verizon announced last month.

Consumer advocates say sponsoring data is problematic because it could draw consumers to bigger, established services that are able to pay for free access, at the expense of startups and smaller companies. For Verizon, the broadband provider, to exempt its own video service is particularly anti-competitive, said Matt Wood, the policy director for consumer advocate Free Press.

Government regulators are already studying how AT&T, T-Mobile and Comcast are using sponsored data or exempting some services from data caps. Comcast’s nascent online video service, Stream, wouldn’t count toward data caps in markets where the cable giant has them. T-Mobile exempts many video and music services from its caps, and doesn’t make providers pay; its exemptions do include rivals such as Verizon’s go90. AT&T has a handful of companies in a sponsored-data program, and has hinted that sponsored data will be a “critical element” of a future mobile video offering.

Verizon’s exemptions apply to customers who pay their cellphone bills at the end of the month — “postpaid” in industry jargon, rather than prepaid. Go90 video includes some full episodes of TV shows, like “The Daily Show,” original video and news and sports.

— Tali Arbel, AP Technology Writer

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The organization that oversees the Internet’s domain name system has tapped a Swedish telecommunications official to become its next leader.

Among other things, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers is in charge of domain name suffixes — the “.com” in Internet addresses. It decides which suffixes are available and who runs their databases. The change in leadership comes as ICANN adds hundreds of new suffixes to the system and as the U.S. government prepares to relinquish veto authority over these matters.

Goran Marby, director-general of the Swedish Post and Telecom Authority, will start in May as ICANN’s president and CEO. He will replace Fadi Chehade, who is stepping down March 15. An ICANN official will serve as an interim CEO.

— Anick Jesdanun, AP Technology Writer

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — The last four occupiers of an Oregon wildlife refuge have posted a series of defiant videos in which one of them calls FBI agents losers, shows a defensive perimeter they have built and takes a joyride in a government vehicle.

The videos were posted Sunday on a YouTube channel called Defend Your Base, which the armed group has been using to give live updates. The holdouts are among 16 people charged with conspiracy to interfere with federal workers in the armed standoff over federal land policy that has surpassed five weeks.

In one of the new videos, occupier David Fry says the FBI told him he faces additional charges because of defensive barricades the four have built.

“We just got done talking with the FBI,” said the 27-year-old Blanchester, Ohio, resident. “They consider fortifying a crime.”

Fry said he, Jeff Banta of Nevada, and husband and wife Sean and Sandy Anderson of Idaho have “every right” to defend themselves from the “oncoming onslaught of people with fully automatic rifles (and) armored vehicles.

“I’m tired of you guys telling us what we can and can’t do,” he says.

Then Fry shows government vehicles they have been using without permission. He walks up to a white truck and says, “I think I’m going to take it on a little joyride.

“Now you’ve got another charge on me FBI. I’m driving your vehicle.”

FBI spokeswoman Beth Anne Steele said the agency had no comment on the videos.

The four have refused to leave the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in eastern Oregon since the compound nearly emptied out after the Jan. 26 arrests of group leader Ammon Bundy and other main figures. The group seized the property on Jan. 2, demanding federal lands be turned over to locals.

The traffic stop on a remote road outside the refuge also led police to shoot and kill Robert “LaVoy” Finicum. The FBI says the Arizona rancher was reaching for a pistol in his pocket, but Finicum’s family and Bundy’s followers dispute that and say his death was not justified.

Authorities surrounded the refuge after the arrests. The FBI has been negotiating, but the holdouts have said they won’t go home without assurances they won’t be arrested.

In another video posted Sunday, Sean and Sandy Anderson are sitting together and the husband says they feel like hostages because they can’t leave without being arrested.

“What are they to do with us?” Sean Anderson says. “They either let us go, drop all charges because we’re good people, or they come in and kill us. How’s that going to set with America?”

Meanwhile, Ammon Bundy’s attorneys on Monday released an audio recording in which the jailed occupation leader called on elected officials in eight states to visit arrested occupiers from those states and show support for their rights to free speech, assembly and civil disobedience.

While federal authorities say the refuge occupation is illegal and Bundy’s followers had threatened violence and intimidated federal employees, Bundy contends the takeover was a peaceful protest.

A Nevada state Assembly member who is sympathetic to Bundy’s cause, Michelle Fiore, said Monday she and lawmakers from several other states plan to meet in Portland this week to protest the jailing of Bundy and his followers. She said the lawmakers are members of a group called the Coalition of Western States, which opposes federal management of Western lands.

“My folks are prisoners for exercising political free speech. That is not OK,” the Republican lawmaker told the AP.

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Associated Press writer Ken Ritter contributed to this report from Las Vegas, Nevada.

WASHINGTON (AP) — Beyonce’s new video “Formation” is “pro-Black Panther” and “anti-cop,” says a Republican congressman, who argued Monday that it perpetuates a lie about the August 2014 shooting in Missouri of an unarmed black man by a white police officer.

“Beyonce may be a gifted entertainer but no one should really care what she thinks about any serious issue confronting our nation,” New York Rep. Pete King said in a statement he posted on his Facebook page.

King condemned the video, released by the Grammy-winning singer ahead of her world tour and her performance during halftime of Sunday’s Super Bowl. He also complained about the mainstream media’s acceptance of the video and her Super Bowl appearance.

Beyonce’s publicist had no immediate response to an email request for comment.

In the video, Beyonce is seen atop a police cruiser and there are references to the Black Lives Matter movement. King also complained that the video makes the “ritualistic reference to Michael Brown and Ferguson, Missouri, by featuring a scene of innocent people with their hands raised high above their heads in surrender.”

King dismissed the notion that Brown was murdered by police as he was attempting to surrender and said this “fable” was thoroughly discredited.

“In simple language it was and is a lie from beginning to end,” the congressman said, arguing that Brown was a criminal who had robbed a convenience store and the officer, Darren Wilson, was exonerated by the local prosecutor and President Barack Obama’s Justice Department.

“Yet the big lie continues by Black Lives Matter, by pandering politicians and now by Beyoncé, who gets star billing at the Super Bowl,” said King, who added that his father proudly served in the New York Police Department for more than 30 years.

Former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani, in an interview on Fox News Channel’s “Fox & Friends,” criticized Beyonce’s halftime show and references to the Black Panthers. Dancers with the singer had afros and black berets, reminiscent of the 1960s group.

“I thought it was really outrageous that she used it as a platform to attack police officers, who are the people who protect her and protect us,” Giuliani said.

JOHANNESBURG (AP) — The cellphone video pans from passengers, some wearing oxygen masks, in seats toward the back of the airliner in flight, and then swivels to the empty front area with a hole in the side of the cabin, the result of an explosion soon after takeoff from Somalia’s capital.

The passengers bunched in the back, likely instructed to sit far from the hole, appear calm. A child wearing an oxygen mask attached to the overhead compartment sits quietly, a blanket over his or her legs. Near the hole, oxygen masks dangle, swaying in a light breeze.

There is a loud sound of rushing air throughout the video, which was taken by Awale Kullane, Somalia’s deputy ambassador to the United Nations. The Greece-based Hermes Airlines plane took off from Mogadishu’s airport, bound for Djibouti, and returned for an emergency landing after the explosion.

The plane was not that full during boarding, so people sat wherever they wanted, he said. Kullane. He recalled hearing a crewmember announcing over the communications system that the plane was at an altitude of about 11,000 feet (3.35 kilometers) and people should keep their seatbelts on until authorized to move around.

“Then I heard a big bang, so, and the smoke erupted so we couldn’t see anything for a few seconds, so it was a bit scary,” said Kullane, who was sitting in the middle of the airplane.

“Most people started moving behind me so I saw kind of a space of, a chunk of small area of the plane missing, and that air was floating in and out, and the oxygen masks had started to drop above us. So everything looked a bit more critical,” he said.

“I took a video clip after things had settled down and most people started moving at the back of the plane,” Kullane said. “For the first few seconds and minutes… I was terrified and most people were terrified.”

Somali officials said Wednesday they had found no evidence so far of a criminal act. Serbian pilot Vladimir Vodopivec said pressure was lost in the cabin and he suspects the blast was caused by a bomb. Somali officials said there were two injuries. There were also unverified reports that a person fell out of the hole.

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Follow Christopher Torchia on Twitter at www.twitter.com/torchiachris

The NFL allowed coaches and players to use video on the Microsoft Surface tablets rather than just still photos for the Pro Bowl in Honolulu on Sunday.

A perfect opportunity to experiment with changes, the Pro Bowl is where the lengthier extra-point kicks were first tried.

“That was pretty nice, because we usually just have the SnapChat pictures that we use,” Tampa Bay quarterback Jameis Winston said of the availability of videos, “but to actually have the video on there was very useful. It was very helpful.”

Videos were available during preseason games last summer and generally met with strong support from players and coaches.

“We went to Microsoft, which developed a system we are testing today for all coaches and players to see how they like it, and how they work it into the game,” said Michelle McKenna, the NFL’s senior vice president and chief technology officer. “Microsoft has provided an amazing device to stand up to (weather challenges). We learned a lot about how we have to standardize it on every sideline, have a standard setup for technology.

“It has been very successful so far,” she added of the use of still photos on the sideline tablets. “When you roll out any technology, you want to make sure it works. If you go to the trouble of planning a game around it, make sure (everyone) knows how to use it. It was slow acceptance at first, but this year, nearly every player and coach was using it to pinch and zoom and illustrate. A great teaching tool, and video, it is the next step.

“We will always try to evolve the sideline.”

Also in use Sunday was an upgraded coaches-to-coaches communications system for each team. The league has had some issues this season with the current system, which has been in use for a decade.

Some people blamed the problems on the headsets, but the real difficulty has been in the actual system in place.

The new, digital and encrypted communications have been tested on non-game personnel in all 31 stadiums.

“We have had challenges for the last several years with frequency congestion,” McKenna noted. “Sometimes coaches have had to go on a wire, and then someone has to follow him around. That’s been due to frequency interference on the wireless. And when you go to wired communications, it’s typical when there is bad weather or water saturates into those wires, you can get interference.

“We’re looking for a very reliable wireless system so we very rarely have to go to a wire, and when we do go to wire, it is sent over the Internet, which is much more reliable.”

Use of either the Surface tablet videos or coaches’ communications system for games that count must be approved by ownership at league meetings in either March or May. The powerful competition committee will first consider adaptation of each in February before making recommendations to the owners.

“There will be healthy debate on the competition committee,” McKenna said. “Video on the sideline will be a big game changer for how you coach the game.”

———

AP NFL website: www.pro32.ap.org and www.twitter.com/AP—NFL

The NFL allowed coaches and players to use video on the Microsoft Surface tablets rather than just still photos for the Pro Bowl in Honolulu on Sunday.

A perfect opportunity to experiment with changes, the Pro Bowl is where the lengthier extra-point kicks were first tried.

“That was pretty nice, because we usually just have the SnapChat pictures that we use,” Tampa Bay quarterback Jameis Winston said of the availability of videos, “but to actually have the video on there was very useful. It was very helpful.”

Videos were available during preseason games last summer and generally met with strong support from players and coaches.

“We went to Microsoft, which developed a system we are testing today for all coaches and players to see how they like it, and how they work it into the game,” said Michelle McKenna, the NFL’s senior vice president and chief technology officer. “Microsoft has provided an amazing device to stand up to (weather challenges). We learned a lot about how we have to standardize it on every sideline, have a standard setup for technology.

“It has been very successful so far,” she added of the use of still photos on the sideline tablets. “When you roll out any technology, you want to make sure it works. If you go to the trouble of planning a game around it, make sure (everyone) knows how to use it. It was slow acceptance at first, but this year, nearly every player and coach was using it to pinch and zoom and illustrate. A great teaching tool, and video, it is the next step.

“We will always try to evolve the sideline.”

Also in use Sunday was an upgraded coaches-to-coaches communications system for each team. The league has had some issues this season with the current system, which has been in use for a decade.

Some people blamed the problems on the headsets, but the real difficulty has been in the actual system in place.

The new, digital and encrypted communications have been tested on non-game personnel in all 31 stadiums.

“We have had challenges for the last several years with frequency congestion,” McKenna noted. “Sometimes coaches have had to go on a wire, and then someone has to follow him around. That’s been due to frequency interference on the wireless. And when you go to wired communications, it’s typical when there is bad weather or water saturates into those wires, you can get interference.

“We’re looking for a very reliable wireless system so we very rarely have to go to a wire, and when we do go to wire, it is sent over the Internet, which is much more reliable.”

Use of either the Surface tablet videos or coaches’ communications system for games that count must be approved by ownership at league meetings in either March or May. The powerful competition committee will first consider adaptation of each in February before making recommendations to the owners.

“There will be healthy debate on the competition committee,” McKenna said. “Video on the sideline will be a big game changer for how you coach the game.”

———

AP NFL website: www.pro32.ap.org and www.twitter.com/AP—NFL