NEW YORK (AP) — Fox News says Sean Hannity won’t be appearing in any more campaign videos for Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump.

Hannity touts what he sees as the benefits of a Trump presidency in a video titled “#HEARTLAND4TRUMP” posted on the candidate’s YouTube channel Sunday. Hannity’s appears in about 30 seconds of the 8-minute long video.

In a statement, Fox News said Hannity “will not be doing anything along these lines for the remainder of the election season.” Fox said it did not know in advance that Hannity would be making the appearance.

In the video, Hannity is identified as a “TV personality.” Conservative rocker Ted Nugent and several hunters appear to express the belief that Trump will protect their rights. Hannity says that he has been a marksman since he was 11 years old, so “protecting our Second Amendment rights is paramount to me.”

A Fox spokeswoman had no immediate answer Wednesday when asked whether Hannity would be disciplined for the campaign appearance. In 2010, Hannity was ordered by his Fox bosses to cancel an appearance at a Tea Party rally in Cincinnati. He was to headline a fundraiser for the political organization and planned to broadcast the rally on his show.

Hannity has made no secret of his support for Trump and acknowledged to The New York Times last month he gives the candidate campaign advice. He maintains that as an opinionated talk show host, he should not be held to the same impartiality standards as reporters.

As Trump has cut back on opportunities for reporters to question him, Fox News — and particularly Hannity’s show — has been a favored venue. A Trump town hall in Ohio on Wednesday morning, with Hannity’s participation, is to be aired on Hannity’s prime-time show at 10 p.m. EDT.

GRETNA, La. (AP) — A police officer in the New Orleans suburb of Gretna was arrested in connection with a surveillance video that showed him repeatedly kicking a handcuffed burglary suspect earlier this year.

The suspect was face-down on the ground as he was kicked.

Officer Robert Wallow was fired Thursday and arrested Friday on malfeasance and simple battery charges, according to New Orleans media reports.

Gretna police chief Arthur Lawson said he is not happy that it took so long for the video to be brought to his attention following the April 22 arrest. Other officers could be seen in the video. One officer has been placed on administrative leave as an internal investigation continues.

Lawson said the suspect was not seriously injured and never filed a complaint.

The use of excessive force was apparently reported to supervisors with the Field Operations Bureau in the days after Pineda’s arrest, Lawson told Nola.comThe Times-Picayune. The supervisors opened a documented internal investigation that included a copy of the video.

The supervisors handled the investigation on a bureau level. But it was not forwarded to the administration as quickly as Lawson would have liked so the department on Sept. 15 opened an internal investigation into the handling of that excessive force report.

Wallow, 47, had been with the department for about 18 months. He has not spoken publicly and records indicating whether he has an attorney who could speak on his behalf were not available Saturday.

Rafael Goyeneche, president of a local law enforcement watchdog group, the New Orleans Metropolitan Crime Commission, said kicks delivered to a prone suspect offering no resistance were clear instances of misconduct.

“That’s a battery; that’s malfeasance. Administratively, it’s unacceptable; criminally, it’s unacceptable,” Goyeneche said, “unless there’s some compelling reason that wasn’t captured on tape.”

GRETNA, La. (AP) — A police officer in the New Orleans suburb of Gretna was arrested in connection with a surveillance video that showed him repeatedly kicking a handcuffed burglary suspect earlier this year.

The suspect was face-down on the ground as he was kicked.

New Orleans media report that Officer Robert Wallow was fired Thursday and arrested Friday on malfeasance and simple battery charges.

Gretna police chief Arthur Lawson said he is not happy that it took so long for the video to be brought to his attention following the April 22 arrest. Other officers could be seen in the video. One officer has been placed on administrative leave as an internal investigation continues.

Lawson said the suspect was not seriously injured and never filed a complaint.

VIENNA (AP) — An Austrian court has sentenced a man to two years in prison for reposting videos online of beheadings by the Islamic State group.

The court convicted the 18-year-old of belonging to a terrorist organization.

His defense argued that he was traumatized as a child by fighting in Chechnya.

The Austria Press Agency cited the offender Tuesday as saying he was radicalized in prison while serving a 14-month sentence for robbery and other offenses that ended last year.

He said that he was in contact with an uncle who was fighting in Syria.

The prosecution cited him as telling that relative that “we will see each other soon by Allah.” But the man testified he never had any intention of joining him.

The man was not identified in keeping with Austrian privacy laws.

TOKYO (AP) — Sony Corp.’s video game division is readying not just games but also music, movies and other kinds of entertainment for its Virtual Reality headgear, set to go on sale next month.

Sony Interactive Entertainment Japan Asia President Atsushi Morita appeared at a Tokyo event Tuesday, ahead of the Tokyo Game Show annual exhibition opening later this week. The latest in video games, including VR, will be on display at the show at Makuhari Messe in the Tokyo suburb of Chiba.

One of the VR experiences promised is a music video that’s a collaboration between the “Biohazard” horror game, called “Resident Evil” in the U.S., from Japanese game maker Capcom, and L’Arc-en-Ciel, a Japanese rock band, that takes advantage of VR technology’s illusion of 3-D and 360-degree surround imagery.

VR can make games more immersive, enhancing the effects of horror, razzle-dazzle and erotic titillation.

The Japanese electronics and entertainment company’s PlayStation VR headgear device, going on sale next month for about $400, less than rival VR headsets. Oculus Rift’s goes for about $600, and HTC Vive’s for $800.

Another VR shown at Tokyo-based Sony’s event was the “Anywhere VR,” which delivers to headset wearers a relaxing scene, such as a beach or a star-studded sky, even in their living rooms, while they take care of smartphone chores in VR.

Morita said the PlayStation VR will also be used to show live-theater performances, tours of historical sites and karaoke video.

“As a child, I learned so much from games,” he said.

Morita defended his industry against the common criticism that it distracts children from education and real-life development.

He said he learned about societal rules and human drama from games, manga and music. That spirit of creativity must be passed down to future generations, he said.

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Follow Yuri Kageyama on Twitter at https://twitter.com/yurikageyama

Her work can be found at http://bigstory.ap.org/content/yuri-kageyama

WEST POINT, N.Y. (AP) — The U.S. Military Academy removed a video clip of the football team’s postgame locker-room celebration after its upset win over Temple and is investigating whether a team prayer violated the religious freedom of the players.

West Point spokesman Francis J. DeMaro Jr. said Thursday that a third party made allegations the video violated the First Amendment rights of some of the cadets. DeMaro said the video, which was posted on social media, was removed pending the inquiry, which was first reported by Army Times.

Mikey Weinstein, president of the Military Religious Freedom Foundation, said head coach Jeff Monken crossed the line after the game last Friday night in Philadelphia when he asked a staff assistant to conduct a prayer that ended with Jesus.

“In this case, Coach Monken chose the wrong time, the wrong place and the wrong manner,” Weinstein said Thursday. “He can’t tell anybody, put your hand on someone and let’s pray. You can’t do it, particularly when you’re the head coach (of a public school).”

Weinstein said the video received 232,000 views and 2,000 Facebook shares. He said he started getting “inundated” with phone calls, texts and emails, including 44 from West Point graduates, 40 members of the academy faculty and staff, and six football players, prompting a call to West Point Superintendent Lt. Gen. Robert Caslen.

Weinstein, who said the video was replaced by an edited version, said he was expecting Monken to offer an apology later Thursday.

“We assume that there’s going to be an apology from the coach to the team,” Weinstein said. “We are assuming there’s an admission there was a misstep.”

Weinstein said Army athletic director Boo Corrigan was putting procedures in place with all coaches at the academy that will prevent a similar situation from happening. Because of his relationship with Caslen, Weinstein said he does not plan to file a third-party inspector general’s complaint on the issue.

The MRFF, which claims 47,300 clients, questioned a practice by the Air Force Academy football team late last year after players began kneeling in prayer prior to games. The academy found it was within regulations.