JOHANNESBURG (AP) — The cellphone video pans from passengers, some wearing oxygen masks, in seats toward the back of the airliner in flight, and then swivels to the empty front area with a hole in the side of the cabin, the result of an explosion soon after takeoff from Somalia’s capital.

The passengers bunched in the back, likely instructed to sit far from the hole, appear calm. A child wearing an oxygen mask attached to the overhead compartment sits quietly, a blanket over his or her legs. Near the hole, oxygen masks dangle, swaying in a light breeze.

There is a loud sound of rushing air throughout the video, which was taken by Awale Kullane, Somalia’s deputy ambassador to the United Nations. The Greece-based Hermes Airlines plane took off from Mogadishu’s airport, bound for Djibouti, and returned for an emergency landing after the explosion.

The plane was not that full during boarding, so people sat wherever they wanted, he said. Kullane. He recalled hearing a crewmember announcing over the communications system that the plane was at an altitude of about 11,000 feet (3.35 kilometers) and people should keep their seatbelts on until authorized to move around.

“Then I heard a big bang, so, and the smoke erupted so we couldn’t see anything for a few seconds, so it was a bit scary,” said Kullane, who was sitting in the middle of the airplane.

“Most people started moving behind me so I saw kind of a space of, a chunk of small area of the plane missing, and that air was floating in and out, and the oxygen masks had started to drop above us. So everything looked a bit more critical,” he said.

“I took a video clip after things had settled down and most people started moving at the back of the plane,” Kullane said. “For the first few seconds and minutes… I was terrified and most people were terrified.”

Somali officials said Wednesday they had found no evidence so far of a criminal act. Serbian pilot Vladimir Vodopivec said pressure was lost in the cabin and he suspects the blast was caused by a bomb. Somali officials said there were two injuries. There were also unverified reports that a person fell out of the hole.

———

Follow Christopher Torchia on Twitter at www.twitter.com/torchiachris

The NFL allowed coaches and players to use video on the Microsoft Surface tablets rather than just still photos for the Pro Bowl in Honolulu on Sunday.

A perfect opportunity to experiment with changes, the Pro Bowl is where the lengthier extra-point kicks were first tried.

“That was pretty nice, because we usually just have the SnapChat pictures that we use,” Tampa Bay quarterback Jameis Winston said of the availability of videos, “but to actually have the video on there was very useful. It was very helpful.”

Videos were available during preseason games last summer and generally met with strong support from players and coaches.

“We went to Microsoft, which developed a system we are testing today for all coaches and players to see how they like it, and how they work it into the game,” said Michelle McKenna, the NFL’s senior vice president and chief technology officer. “Microsoft has provided an amazing device to stand up to (weather challenges). We learned a lot about how we have to standardize it on every sideline, have a standard setup for technology.

“It has been very successful so far,” she added of the use of still photos on the sideline tablets. “When you roll out any technology, you want to make sure it works. If you go to the trouble of planning a game around it, make sure (everyone) knows how to use it. It was slow acceptance at first, but this year, nearly every player and coach was using it to pinch and zoom and illustrate. A great teaching tool, and video, it is the next step.

“We will always try to evolve the sideline.”

Also in use Sunday was an upgraded coaches-to-coaches communications system for each team. The league has had some issues this season with the current system, which has been in use for a decade.

Some people blamed the problems on the headsets, but the real difficulty has been in the actual system in place.

The new, digital and encrypted communications have been tested on non-game personnel in all 31 stadiums.

“We have had challenges for the last several years with frequency congestion,” McKenna noted. “Sometimes coaches have had to go on a wire, and then someone has to follow him around. That’s been due to frequency interference on the wireless. And when you go to wired communications, it’s typical when there is bad weather or water saturates into those wires, you can get interference.

“We’re looking for a very reliable wireless system so we very rarely have to go to a wire, and when we do go to wire, it is sent over the Internet, which is much more reliable.”

Use of either the Surface tablet videos or coaches’ communications system for games that count must be approved by ownership at league meetings in either March or May. The powerful competition committee will first consider adaptation of each in February before making recommendations to the owners.

“There will be healthy debate on the competition committee,” McKenna said. “Video on the sideline will be a big game changer for how you coach the game.”

———

AP NFL website: www.pro32.ap.org and www.twitter.com/AP—NFL

The NFL allowed coaches and players to use video on the Microsoft Surface tablets rather than just still photos for the Pro Bowl in Honolulu on Sunday.

A perfect opportunity to experiment with changes, the Pro Bowl is where the lengthier extra-point kicks were first tried.

“That was pretty nice, because we usually just have the SnapChat pictures that we use,” Tampa Bay quarterback Jameis Winston said of the availability of videos, “but to actually have the video on there was very useful. It was very helpful.”

Videos were available during preseason games last summer and generally met with strong support from players and coaches.

“We went to Microsoft, which developed a system we are testing today for all coaches and players to see how they like it, and how they work it into the game,” said Michelle McKenna, the NFL’s senior vice president and chief technology officer. “Microsoft has provided an amazing device to stand up to (weather challenges). We learned a lot about how we have to standardize it on every sideline, have a standard setup for technology.

“It has been very successful so far,” she added of the use of still photos on the sideline tablets. “When you roll out any technology, you want to make sure it works. If you go to the trouble of planning a game around it, make sure (everyone) knows how to use it. It was slow acceptance at first, but this year, nearly every player and coach was using it to pinch and zoom and illustrate. A great teaching tool, and video, it is the next step.

“We will always try to evolve the sideline.”

Also in use Sunday was an upgraded coaches-to-coaches communications system for each team. The league has had some issues this season with the current system, which has been in use for a decade.

Some people blamed the problems on the headsets, but the real difficulty has been in the actual system in place.

The new, digital and encrypted communications have been tested on non-game personnel in all 31 stadiums.

“We have had challenges for the last several years with frequency congestion,” McKenna noted. “Sometimes coaches have had to go on a wire, and then someone has to follow him around. That’s been due to frequency interference on the wireless. And when you go to wired communications, it’s typical when there is bad weather or water saturates into those wires, you can get interference.

“We’re looking for a very reliable wireless system so we very rarely have to go to a wire, and when we do go to wire, it is sent over the Internet, which is much more reliable.”

Use of either the Surface tablet videos or coaches’ communications system for games that count must be approved by ownership at league meetings in either March or May. The powerful competition committee will first consider adaptation of each in February before making recommendations to the owners.

“There will be healthy debate on the competition committee,” McKenna said. “Video on the sideline will be a big game changer for how you coach the game.”

———

AP NFL website: www.pro32.ap.org and www.twitter.com/AP—NFL

American colleges sorting through a record number of applications from China are increasingly turning to video interviewing services to assess students’ language skills, get a feel for their personality — and weed out fraudsters.

The recorded interviews, recommended by dozens of schools, have emerged as a way to address cheating concerns highlighted by a breach that forced a cancellation last weekend of SAT exams in China.

“If you believe in all the fraudulent claims, and there certainly has been some documentation out there, then the one true equalizer is getting an unscripted interview with a limited English speaker,” said Kregg Strehorn, an assistant provost at the University of Massachusetts. “That will put anyone’s mind to rest.”

Admissions officers are wary of fraud in applications from all countries, including the U.S., but attention has focused on China with the huge rise in applications from the country’s middle class. More than 300,000 people from China studied in the U.S. last year, up from roughly 60,000 only a decade ago.

College officials and industry consultants describe a range of issues including plagiarism, purchased transcripts and surrogate test-takers. Evidence is largely anecdotal and the topic can be a delicate one for colleges, which receive a boost by enrolling international students who often pay full tuition.

“It’s the kryptonite of international education,” said Daniel Ghur, who has studied fraud as the director of the Illuminate Consulting Group in California.

One service provider, InitialView, was launched in Beijing in 2009 by an American couple. While many colleges have interviewed students themselves on the Internet, the company offers verification of student identities. InitialView conducts interviews in 14 cities across China and has begun operating in other countries. The company charges a one-time fee of $220 and will send a recording of the interview to as many schools as the student wants.

“The schools that use us, they just want to have integrity in their process,” company founder Terry Crawford said.

A Wellesley College student, Linda Liu, said she sat for an InitialView interview at the urging of a counseling agency that helped her with college applications. Liu, 18, said the service has grown in popularity among students at her Beijing high school and she saw it as an opportunity to tell American schools more about herself.

“It’s a way to show yourself, showing actually who you are, in a very direct way instead of just showing it in on paper or in essays,” she said.

For colleges, the interviews offer a baseline for assessing students from a different system for secondary education. Even as American admissions officers have visited China to recruit students and better understand local institutions they say it remains difficult to know how to weigh the significance and validity of varied transcripts and recommendations.

“It’s one of those ‘the more you know, the less you understand’ situations,” said Rick Clark, admissions director at Georgia Tech. “You cannot apply an American filter.”

Georgia Tech, which now reviews interviews from non-native English speakers in any country, started with applications from China several years ago to find students who would adapt well to campus life after some professors noted a lack of classroom interaction by Chinese students, Clark said. In practice, he said, the interviews on occasion have helped to flag potential fraud in cases where statements in an interview blatantly contradict material in a student’s application file.

Scrutiny of Chinese application materials was expected to increase after the College Board, the New York-based nonprofit organization that oversees SAT registrations, canceled the exams at 45 testing centers in China and Macau last weekend over concerns that some students might have accessed copies of the exam in advance. The company wouldn’t say how many students might have seen the tests, or how they did so.

Admissions officers say suspected fraud has turned up in applications from many countries. One challenge in vetting applications from China, they say, is separating out the work of the many third-party agents and consultants who promise to help students win admission to American universities.

At the University of Oregon, which recommends the interview services, admissions director Jim Rawlins said he worries more about Chinese students becoming victims themselves than about them committing fraud. When discrepancies are found in Chinese applications he said the university often suspects consultants or agents who submit fake documents, possibly without students’ knowledge.

“Every now and then a student gets turned down and, when told why, is very surprised to hear what was done on their behalf,” he said.

BURNS, Ore. (AP) — FBI shows video of fatal traffic-stop shooting of armed occupier of Oregon wildlife refuge.

WASHINGTON (AP) — Secretary of Defense Ash Carter says Iran’s videotaping of American sailors surrendering aboard their boats in the Persian Gulf earlier this month made him deeply angry.

In the video, the 10 Americans were on their knees with their hands on the heads, as Iranian troops took them and their boats into custody. They were released the following morning. The boats had crossed into Iranian territorial waters for reasons the U.S. Navy has not yet fully explained.

Carter said that if the circumstances were reversed, U.S. forces would not have videotaped captured Iranian sailors.

He said he has no reason to think the U.S. sailors acted inappropriately. One of them admitted on camera that the boats had strayed into Iranian waters, and he apologized for that.