ChannelOne.com has lots of resources that can help students with their homework. Have you looked through the Video Library? It is full of videos that teens can use as they tackle after-school assignments. The Video Library organizes clips by “newest first” so it’s easy to find reports on important world events and hot topics. Kids can locate videos on a wide range of topics and access content related to their work in school. It’s also a great place to send students to gather information on a topic or answer questions they have about current events.

Everyday Assignments

The Video Library on ChannelOne.com can give students an overview of topics so they are better informed and ready to complete their homework. For example, if they have to write about Syria as part of a current events assignment, a quick search of the Video Library will give them a few clips to watch. Students will build their background knowledge on the subject and be ready to answer questions about chemical warfare and the political climate of the country.

Research Projects

For teens working on research projects the Video Library on ChannelOne.com can help them locate information. Students can type in a keyword in the search function or look through different categories or tags to learn more about a subject. Watching a news program that combines high quality reporting with video is a great way to help students stay informed on a subject. It will keep them interested in the topic while they make sense of the information they’ve gathered from other sources. When assigning a research report to students you can require them to include video clips in their bibliography to show that they were able to use a variety of sources. EasyBib.com has a guide for citing video clips like the ones featured on ChannelOne.com.

Flipped Learning

Many teachers are exploring the idea of the flipped classroom and the Video Library at ChannelOne.com can help educators choose the right clips to assign to students. In the flipped classroom model, teachers assign videos for students to watch at home so when they come to class they are prepared to talk about the subject. These clips can include lectures, tutorials or any media that presents content. Teachers can assign ChannelOne.com news clips for kids to watch at home or during a free period as part of their homework. If this happens outside of the classroom, teachers can use their face-to-face time with students for whole group discussions, group work and partner activities.

Video Transcripts

Each clip in the ChannelOne.com Video Library includes a full transcript from that segment. Videos offer a unique way to learn about a subject and the transcript will help teens follow along and learn new vocabulary words by reviewing them in context. The ability to pause a clip to take notes or refer to the transcript included with each video post will help students as they get ready to write and report about a topic.

Have you asked students to watch videos at home? How has the Video Library fit into your student’s afterschool routine? Share your story in the comments section.

Monica Burns is an Education Consultant, EdTech Blogger, and Apple Distinguished Educator. Visit her site ClassTechTips.com for more ideas on how to become a tech-savvy teacher.

LOS ANGELES (AP) — The 89th Academy Awards show promises to be equal parts pomp and politics.

The only thing expected to take the stage more often than the frothy front-runner “La La Land” at Sunday’s ceremony is protest (and probably some punchlines) over the policies of President Donald Trump. For largely liberal Hollywood, his election has proven a rallying cause-celebre throughout an awards season that has otherwise been a parade of honors for Damien Chazelle’s celebrated musical.

Just how political things are going to get at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles may be the biggest question of Sunday night’s show, to be broadcast by ABC beginning at 8:30 p.m. EST, with red carpet coverage starting earlier. The current forecast for Sunday is only a slight chance of rain, though the inside of the Dolby Theatre is expected to be far stormier.

Even the usually glitzy lead-up to Sunday’s show has taken on the form of a gathering tempest. On Friday, the United Talent Agency, forgoing its usual Oscar party, instead held a rally over immigration. “We will not tolerate chaos and ineptitude and war-mongering,” Jodie Foster told attendees.

More strikingly, the six directors of the foreign film nominees on Friday released a joint statement condemning “the climate of fanaticism and nationalism we see today in the U.S. and in so many other countries, in parts of the population and, most unfortunately of all, among leading politicians.”

The signees included the Iranian director Asghar Farhadi, whose “The Salesman” is favored to win him his second foreign language Oscar. He isn’t attending the awards out of protest for Trump’s proposed travel ban from seven predominantly Muslim nations, including Iran.

On Friday, he posted a video thanking the Hollywood community for its support of his Oscar boycott. In it, Farhadi condemned Trump’s policies and said they are “trying to promote hate.”

And sure to stoke the rhetoric at Sunday’s Oscars is news this weekend that U.S. immigration authorities are barring entry to a 21-year-old Syrian cinematographer who worked on the documentary short nominee “The White Helmets,” about the nation’s civil war.

Meanwhile, about 20 Trump supporters gathered Saturday at an intersection near the Dolby Theatre on Hollywood Boulevard. One held a sign with Trump’s signature slogan, “Make America Great Again,” while another sign asked motorists to honk if they supported Trump. There were few honks.

Some Trump supporters are calling for a boycott of the broadcast, expecting more speeches like Meryl Streep’s fiery remarks at the Globes — which prompted Trump to call her “overrated.” (The Academy of Motion Pictures on Friday added Streep, also a nominee, to its presenters.) But similar so-called boycotts have also trailed the Broadway sensation “Hamilton” and 2016’s top box-office hit, the “Star Wars” spinoff “Rogue One.”

ABC would be very happy with similar results, especially after last year’s telecast, hosted by Chris Rock, drew 34.4 million viewers, an eight-year low. Ads this year are still going for $2.1 million for 30-second spots.

Host Jimmy Kimmel will have a delicate balance on his hands. Play it too light and he’ll appear out of sync with the mood. Hammer too hard and he’ll alienate viewers already inundated by politics.

A lot of the suspense has been deflated by the juggernaut of “La La Land,” the Golden Globe winner and favorite to win best picture. It’s up for 14 awards, tying it with “Titanic” and “All About Eve” for the record.

Rock’s 2016 show, which he introduced as “the White People’s Choice Awards,” was rife with Hollywood’s diversity debate. But after two straight years of all-white acting nominees and the resulting “OscarsSoWhite” rancor, this year’s field is teaming with African-American actors and filmmakers, thanks to films like best-picture candidates Barry Jenkin’s coming-of-age tale “Moonlight,” Denzel Washington’s August Wilson adaptation “Fences” and Theodore Melfi’s uplifting space-race drama “Hidden Figures.”

For the first time, an actor of color is nominated in each acting category. A record six black actors are nominated. Four of the five films nominated for best documentary were made by black filmmakers. Bradford Young (“Arrival”) is the second black cinematographer ever nominated. Kimberly Steward, the financer of “Manchester by the Sea,” is the second black female producer nominated for best picture.

The nominees follow the efforts by Academy of Motions Pictures Arts and Sciences President Cheryl Boone Isaacs to diversify the membership of the largely white, older and male film academy. In June, the academy added 683 new members: 46 percent of them were female; 41-percent were nonwhite; and they pulled from 59 countries.

There is other turmoil, too. Only one major studio — Paramount, which distributed “Arrival” and “Fences” — scored a best picture nod this year — and its chief, Brad Grey, departed last week. Amazon, on the other hand, scored its first best-picture nomination with “Manchester by the Sea.”

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Nekesa Mumbi Moody contributed to this report.

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Follow AP Film Writer Jake Coyle on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/jakecoyleAP

LAS VEGAS (AP) — The arena has all the features that a professional sports venue needs: stands, warm-up areas for teams, massive screens for spectators and a broadcast platform for commentators. But what distinguishes this new Las Vegas arena is its dozens of video game consoles.

The 15,000-square-foot e-sports venue slated to open Friday will host competitive video game tournaments. It’s part of a trend that the casino industry hopes will attract the millennial crowd, the 15- to 34-year-olds who are becoming majority spenders in today’s economy but aren’t necessarily interested in traditional gambling.

“Las Vegas needs to consistently reinvent itself to remain relevant to the up-and-coming generation,” said Seth Schorr, CEO of Fifth Street Gaming and a member of the board of directors of Millennial Esports, the company behind the arena. “We’ve always come up with ways to maintain our position as the entertainment capital of the world.”

Athletes participating in a tournament at the arena will emerge from a tunnel surrounded by roaring crowds in the stands. They will then go on a podium and sit at stations equipped with game consoles, monitors and other equipment.

The venue will open its doors March 3 with a three-day, $50,000-prize-pool Halo World Championship qualifier and host an EA Sports-sanctioned Madden 17 NFL tournament later in March.

The arena is within walking distance of downtown hotel-casinos. It will host 200 people in stadium-style seating overlooking the main stage, but hundreds more can be accommodated in another hall outfitted with screens showing the live competition. The entire facility was built in an area that once housed movie theaters and a nightclub.

More than 3 miles of CAT cable were needed to wire the facility. Its dozens of ports offer internet speeds of one-gigabit. When no tournaments are in progress, the facility will be open to casual gamers and others interested in using the high-speed internet.

Las Vegas casinos have invested in numerous non-gaming amenities to attract the elusive millennials, from rooms with bunk beds for the young travelers who don’t want to spend a minute apart to a lounge that features pool, foosball and air hockey. The Downtown Grand, a short walk from the new arena, has an e-sports lounge, where tournament competitors, casual gamers and fans play and socialize.

“The younger people don’t get enamored by the glitz and the glitter of something; it’s all about authenticity for them,” said Alex Igelman, CEO of Millennial Esports.

Vegas is betting on e-sports as its popularity has evolved from a niche genre of gaming to a lucrative sport thanks to new technologies, more reliable internet speeds and a generation of gamers that has grown up watching competitive matches on YouTube and other sites. Nevada sportsbooks have already taken wagers on matches.

The sport now draws tens of millions of spectators to online platforms and real-world venues, including New York City’s Madison Square Garden, the Los Angeles’ Staples Center and Las Vegas’ MGM Grand Garden Arena, which earlier this month saw 16 of the world’s best CS:GO teams compete. Estimates show 323 million people watched e-sports in 2016. The global audience is expected to grow to 385 million this year.

“E-sports no longer needs to be legitimized; it’s a huge sport already,” said Mike Sepso, co-founder of Major League Gaming. “There are e-sports fans everywhere in this country.”

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Follow Regina Garcia Cano on Twitter at https://twitter.com/reginagarciakNO. More of her work can be found at https://www.apnews.com/search/ReginaGarciaCano

CRANS MONTANA, Switzerland (AP) — Suddenly the overall title is not looking so certain for Mikaela Shiffrin after Ilka Stuhec won a super-G race on Saturday.

There was also a worrying crash for Lindsey Vonn on a disappointing day for American skiers.

Entering this weekend’s races in Crans Montana, Shiffrin held more than a 400-point lead in the standings over her next active challenger, Sofia Goggia of Italy. Defending overall champion Lara Gut, in second place, is out for the rest of the season after injuring her knee while training between runs of the combined event at the world championships in St. Moritz two weeks ago.

However, Stuhec was second in Friday’s Alpine combined race to leapfrog Goggia into third place overall. The Slovenian went one better on Saturday to cut Shiffrin’s lead to 258 points with nine races remaining — including another combined on Sunday.

Stuhec, the recently crowned downhill world champion, leads the downhill standings and moved to within 16 points of Tina Weirather in the super-G.

Stuhec, who was fastest in the super-G part of the combined on Friday, finished 0.5 seconds ahead of Elena Curtoni as the Italian achieved a best ever finish in a World Cup race. Stephanie Venier of Austria was third.

“I try not to think about the globe — any of them,” Stuhec said. “I just try to focus on every race, do my best and then we will see what comes in the end. I’m just having a lot of fun and I don’t want it to end.

“Combined is always challenging. It’s two totally different disciplines and you have to ski both very well. I’m looking forward to it because apparently super-G works well for me. I know where I went wrong yesterday in the slalom so I’ll try to improve tomorrow.”

Shiffrin finished 13th, more than two seconds behind Stuhec.

“I didn’t quite handle the peeling snow as well as I could have and I was a bit conservative in sections that I didn’t want to be but I’m happy to get a run on this hill,” Shiffrin said. “I’ll get the video, I’ll watch a lot and compare with Ilka who’s been really skiing well and see sections where I can charge a lot harder. I know there are a lot of sections where I need to attack more.”

There was more misery for Lindsey Vonn as she was one of a number of skiers who crashed as the snow began to soften. Goggia also didn’t finish, for the second successive day.

Vonn had pulled out of Friday’s race, along with Shiffrin and their American teammate Laurenne Ross, because of dangerous conditions on the course. She had also posted on social media that she was feeling unwell Friday evening and had not fully recovered.

The announcement of Vonn’s name prompted a smattering of boos among spectators but that turned into loud gasps as the 32-year-old lost control and fell, sliding several feet before crashing into the safety netting.

There was an anxious wait as Vonn remained down and Stuhec and other skiers were clearly concerned for their rival. However, the four-time World Cup overall champion was able to ski down to the finish area, where she was greeted with loud cheers.

Vonn, who only returned to competition last month after nearly a year out with knee and arm injuries, was visibly upset and appeared to be crying as she was comforted by teammate Julia Mancuso.

The former Olympic champion also missed nearly two seasons of competition after injuring her right knee in Austria in 2013 and hurting the same knee in her comeback.

WASHINGTON (AP) — FBI Director James Comey is again in a familiar spot these days — the middle of political tumult.

As a high-ranking Justice Department official in the George W. Bush administration, he clashed with the White House over a secret surveillance program. Years later as head of the FBI, he incurred the ire of Hillary Clinton supporters for public statements on an investigation into her emails. Now, Comey is facing new political pressure as White House officials are encouraging him to follow their lead by publicly recounting private FBI conversations in an attempt to dispute reports about connections between the Trump administration and Russia.

It’s an unusual position for a crime-fighting organization with a vaunted reputation for independence and political neutrality. Yet Comey, the former top federal prosecutor in Manhattan who later became deputy attorney general of the United States, is known for an unshaking faith in his own moral compass.

“I’m not detecting a loss of confidence in him, a loss of confidence in him by him,” said retired FBI assistant director Ron Hosko, noting the broad recognition that “these are very tumultuous, polarized, angry, angry times.”

The latest flare up occurred Friday, when White House officials told reporters that chief of staff Reince Priebus had asked top FBI officials to dispute media reports that Donald Trump’s campaign advisers were frequently in touch with Russian intelligence agents during the election. The officials said the FBI first raised concerns about New York Times reporting but told Priebus the bureau could not weigh in publicly on the matter. The officials said Deputy Director Andrew McCabe and Comey instead gave Priebus the go-ahead to discredit the story publicly, something the FBI has not confirmed.

As the FBI declined to discuss the matter, pressure mounted on Comey to either counter or affirm the White House’s account. Even the Trump administration urged him to come forward, which as of Friday was not happening.

“Politicized assertions by White House chief of staff Priebus about what may or may not be the findings of an FBI investigation are exactly the wrong way for the public to hear about an issue that is of grave consequence to our democracy,” Sen. Ron Wyden, an Oregon Democrat and member of the Senate Intelligence Committee, said in a statement. “The American people deserve real transparency, which means Director Comey needs to come forward, in an open hearing, and answer questions.”

The push on Comey to publicly discuss the bureau’s investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election is especially acute given his statements in the run-up to Nov. 8 that many Democrats believe cost Clinton the election. He detailed the results of the FBI’s investigation at an unusual July news conference, testified on it for hours on Capitol Hill and alerted Congress less than two weeks before Election Day that the FBI would be reviewing new emails potentially connected to the case.

But it’s not clear that Comey, now in the fourth year of a 10-year term, will be swayed by any public hand-wringing. People who have worked with the FBI director describe him as holding strong personal convictions.

As deputy attorney general, he confronted White House officials in the hospital room of then-Attorney General John Ashcroft in an effort to quash the reauthorization of a counterterrorism surveillance program.

When nominating Comey for FBI director in 2013, President Barack Obama praised him for his “fierce independence and deep integrity.” Comey stood apart from the administration on a few occasions after that, including when he floated the possibility that police concerns over being recorded on video were causing officers to pull back and contributing to an uptick in homicides, a viewpoint the White House refused to endorse.

His decision to announce the FBI’s recommendation against criminal charges in the Clinton email case was made without any notice to the Justice Department, and his notification to Congress about the new emails was not supported by department leaders, including Attorney General Loretta Lynch.

Decisions that reach the desk of the top leadership of the FBI are generally not easy, said Robert Anderson, a retired FBI executive assistant director.

“The director of the FBI is a hard job, even when it’s an easy day or nothing’s in the newspaper,” Anderson said. “By the time it makes it up to Jim, it’s all hard at that point.”

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Follow Eric Tucker on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/etuckerAP

BERLIN (AP) — German Chancellor Angela Merkel is stressing the need to work for a two-state solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict after President Donald Trump signaled that he could accept a different outcome.

Merkel’s comments in her weekly video message Saturday came ahead of a March 2 visit to regional power Egypt, where she said she will discuss the matter with President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi.

Trump said earlier this month he could accept a two-state solution or a single-state arrangement if it is agreed upon by all sides. His U.N. ambassador then insisted the U.S. absolutely supports a two-state solution.

Merkel said: “I think we must continue on the way to a two-state solution. I see no other possibility becoming reality to achieve a peace process.”