WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. (AP) — A pair of brothers and two other men have been charged with stealing nearly 1,200 laptops bound for public school students in New Jersey after investigators determined their story about a theft didn’t add up.

Anton Saljanin, 43, and Gjon Saljanin, 40, were due to appear in court Thursday with Ujka Vulaj, 54, and Carlos Caceres, 37, on charges including conspiracy and theft from an interstate shipment.

In January 2014, the Saljanins drove a truck from New York’s Yorktown Heights to Massachusetts to pick up a shipment of 1,195 Apple MacBook Air laptops worth more than $1 million that were meant for two public high schools in New Jersey, according to prosecutors.

The next day, Anton Saljanin reported to Yorktown police that the truck had been stolen. Later that day, he told police he spotted the truck in a Danbury, Connecticut, parking lot, but a window was smashed and the computers were missing, investigators said.

But prosecutors say the brothers’ story began to unravel as investigators looked into the case.

Detectives found broken glass in the Danbury parking lot but not in the Yorktown Heights lot where they said the theft occurred. Surveillance video showed the yellow truck taking a detour toward the home of a friend of the men on the night it was said to have been stolen, prosecutors said.

Investigators tracked down the buyers of the stolen laptops through an Apple registry and found Vulaj and Caceres sold them to more than a dozen people for as little as half their usual $1,000 price, prosecutors said.

Lawyers for the brothers told The New York Times they expect their clients to plead not guilty at a hearing. Attorneys for the other men didn’t respond to phone messages seeking comment.

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Country singer Kip Moore’s style is more surfboards and skateboards than cowboy boots, so when he wanted to help children from low-income areas, he found inspiration in his own passions.

Last month in Annapolis, Maryland, Moore opened the first of four skate parks he is helping to fund with the Comeback Kid Skatepark Project, an initiative of his donor-advised charitable fund, Kip’s Kids Fund. Another park opened in San Marcos, Texas, and two more will be opened in Nashville, Tennessee, and Boston.

Moore, along with the city of Annapolis and local community donors, helped refurbish a skate park that had fallen into disrepair by resurfacing the pavement and adding ramps, rails, corner pockets and flip banks. Moore said he wanted to give kids a safe place to practice and create bonds with other skaters.

“Skating is such a brotherhood community,” the 35-year-old singer-songwriter said in an interview with The Associated Press during his first look at the new park in Annapolis. “In a lot of these areas, these kids are dealing with all kinds of different problems. This is a safe place for them to go. And it’s a place where they can be turned on to a new sport that might give them some hope, something to be proud of. I am in a position now to make some things happen and that’s what I want to do in these communities.”

Moore named the project after the song “Comeback Kid” on his new album, “Wild Ones,” which debuted at No. 4 on the Billboard 200 chart last month.

“I see it hopefully being a nationwide thing,” Moore said of his charitable fund. “Hopefully we can expand this thing and turn it into a million different projects, not just skating, but all kinds of things in the inner cities.”

Brad Siedlecki, president of Pillar Design Studios, the company that helped build and design the park, said he was already working with the city to refurbish the park when Moore reached out.

“With Kip’s money, that really brought the whole park together and the kids got a brand-new skate park out of it,” Siedlecki said.

Chris Opilla, an Annapolis skateboarder, said the improvements have already started drawing skaters back to the park.

“The gift from Kip Moore and everybody was a godsend,” Opilla said. “I’ve seen a 20-fold increase in the amount of kids. Kids would come here and get tired of the old wooden ramps that were broken down. But now on a weekend you can easily see 20 kids here at any given time.”

Even Annapolis Mayor Mike Pantelides felt inspired to test out the ramps during the opening, even after he fell off the board a few times.

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Associated Press videographer Rick Gentilo in Annapolis contributed to this story.

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Online:

http://www.kipmoore.org/

DALLAS (AP) — More than 14.2 million people are expected to fly over the seven days surrounding the Labor Day holiday, a 3 percent increase from last year, according to Airlines for America, the industry’s trade and lobbying group.

The unofficial end of summer is one last long weekend for Americans to sneak in a trip, with Friday, Sept. 4, expected to be the busiest day to fly.

Millions of others will drive or take trains and ferries during the holiday. For instance, 1.14 million people are expected to use intercity buses, an increase of 5 percent compared to last year, according to the Chaddick Institute for Metropolitan Development at DePaul University.

But for those who need to get across the country fast, nothing can compete with flying. More families are now able to afford to hop on a plane thanks to a stronger domestic economy.

In advance of the holiday, American Airlines and Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport granted The Associated Press unique access to their operations to get a sense of what it takes to get thousands of passengers to their destination.

(Click here to see the video: https://youtu.be/oXFC2CZ1Lp8 )

Each day, more than 170,000 passengers use the airport, making it the ninth busiest in the world. Since many of those trips are on smaller, domestic jets, the airport sees a higher share of takeoffs and landings than other big hub airports — 1,845 daily flights, which is the fourth most in the world.

In the bellies of those jets each day is another 1,873 metric tons of cargo. It takes a workforce of 60,000 to get all those passengers and the cargo to their destination.

The airport covers 17,207 acres — an area larger than Manhattan — and has five terminals with a total of 165 gates. To get around, passengers use the Skylink tram system, which travels 35 mph to 37 mph. In its decade of operation, the tram fleet has traveled a combined 32,465,945 miles.

Whether traveling this holiday or not, here’s a look at one of the world’s busiest airports: https://youtu.be/oXFC2CZ1Lp8

——

Scott Mayerowitz can be reached at http://twitter.com/GlobeTrotScott

DALLAS (AP) — More than 14.2 million people are expected to fly over the seven days surrounding the Labor Day holiday, a 3 percent increase from last year, according to Airlines for America, the industry’s trade and lobbying group.

The unofficial end of summer is one last long weekend for Americans to sneak in a trip, with Friday, Sept. 4, expected to be the busiest day to fly.

Millions of others will drive or take trains and ferries during the holiday. For instance, 1.14 million people are expected to use intercity buses, an increase of 5 percent compared to last year, according to the Chaddick Institute for Metropolitan Development at DePaul University.

But for those who need to get across the country fast, nothing can compete with flying. More families are now able to afford to hop on a plane thanks to a stronger domestic economy.

In advance of the holiday, American Airlines and Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport granted The Associated Press unique access to their operations to get a sense of what it takes to get thousands of passengers to their destination.

(Click here to see the video: https://youtu.be/oXFC2CZ1Lp8 )

Each day, more than 170,000 passengers use the airport, making it the ninth busiest in the world. Since many of those trips are on smaller, domestic jets, the airport sees a higher share of takeoffs and landings than other big hub airports — 1,845 daily flights, which is the fourth most in the world.

In the bellies of those jets each day is another 1,873 metric tons of cargo. It takes a workforce of 60,000 to get all those passengers and the cargo to their destination.

The airport covers 17,207 acres — an area larger than Manhattan — and has five terminals with a total of 165 gates. To get around, passengers use the Skylink tram system, which travels 35 mph to 37 mph. In its decade of operation, the tram fleet has traveled a combined 32,465,945 miles.

Whether traveling this holiday or not, here’s a look at one of the world’s busiest airports: https://youtu.be/oXFC2CZ1Lp8

——

Scott Mayerowitz can be reached at http://twitter.com/GlobeTrotScott

BALTIMORE (AP) — A protester arrested amid demonstrations in downtown Baltimore during a pretrial hearing in the Freddie Gray case has been released.

Online court records show that 21-year-old Darius Kwame Rosebrough of Baltimore was released Thursday, a day after his arrest.

Rosebrough is better known as Kwame Rose, an activist who gained attention when he confronted Fox News journalist Geraldo Rivera about coverage of demonstrations after Gray’s death.

Online court records show Rosebrough is charged with second-degree assault, disorderly conduct and resisting or interfering with an arrest. Video of the arrest shows him saying he was hit by a car and needs a medic. Police say he wasn’t hit by a car or shocked, but an officer pulled a stun gun on him.

Police say Rosebrough kicked an officer in the face.

KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — Officials from more than 30 nations and 40 international organizations gathered in the Afghan capital Thursday for a regional economic conference to explore ways of rebuilding the country after more than 40 years of war.

They met against a backdrop of tightened security, with road closures, blast walls and checkpoints illustrating the country’s lingering instability despite a 14-year NATO intervention and billions of dollars in foreign aid.

Deputy Foreign Minister Hekmat Khalil Karzai opened the two-day Regional Economic Cooperation Conference, at which delegates were to discuss policy priorities, inter-regional trade, harmonization of customs and border routines, and market expansion. It is the 6th RECCA conference and the first since President Ashraf Ghani assumed office a year ago pledging to end the war with the Taliban and reform the economy.

Economists have forecast 2.5 percent growth this year, after Afghanistan averaged 9 percent annually from 2003 to 2012, according to World Bank figures.

The drawdown of international troops last year has vastly shrunk the war economy that had provided employment for thousands of Afghans. Unemployment is on the rise, pushing increasing numbers of Afghans into the arms of the insurgents.

Pakistani national security adviser Sartaj Aziz will attend the conference on Friday and meet with Afghan leaders. Tensions have flared in recent weeks, with Ghani accusing Islamabad of failing to act against extremists operating along the porous border.

Seven police officers were killed in Afghanistan’s southern Helmand province late Wednesday. The provincial governor’s spokesman Omar Zawak said the policemen, who were manning a checkpoint, were shot dead after their food was poisoned.

Helmand, a longtime Taliban stronghold and the source of much of the country’s opium production, has seen a spike in insurgent attacks. The Taliban seized the district of Musa Qala last week, and were only driven back by Afghan forces days later, after 24 U.S. airstrikes.

Amnesty International meanwhile called for an investigation into the public flogging of a man and a woman, allegedly for adultery, in a remote province this week.

The couple were “illegally” sentenced to 100 lashes by a court in Chagcharan, the capital of Ghor province, Amnesty said. Video of the pair being whipped while a crowd of men looked on was widely circulated on social media.

Amnesty said the punishment was “cruel, inhuman and degrading,” and far from an isolated example. It called on the Afghan government to “do more to impose tighter supervision of all courts, formal and informal, and also abolish corporal punishment entirely.”