We often think of a tablet as a device for consuming content. Something that lets you watch a movie, read a book, or play a game. One of the most engaging tasks you can give a student is to become a creator. This might mean that they design an experiment, write a book or even make a movie. All of these tasks require higher order thinking and give you a chance to assess student understanding.

There are lots of ways that teens can create their own videos but a handful of iPad apps make this process manageable for both teachers and students. With these dynamic tools, teens have the power to tell a story. Whether they are recounting historical events, filming a public service announcement, or publishing a video tutorial for solving a math problem, the iPad is a wonderful tool for student learning.

iMovie

One of the most powerful apps in the iWork suite is iMovie. This creation app is perfect for teens and teachers who want to create their own videos. It gives users the option to work off of templates to drag and drop their own content. Students can place music and audio tracks over pictures and add titles and effects to each clip. iMovie also has the option to create trailers which can be a fun option for students looking to demonstrate their understanding of a topic by using a familiar video format. Although iMovie has plenty of high quality features it won’t be overwhelming for new users who can follow along with the instructions on the screen to create a simple or complex final product.

ChatterPix Kids

This user-friendly iPad app might look a little elementary but it’s a great choice for middle school and high school students. Teens can grab a picture from the Internet and save it to their camera roll or snap a photograph of a primary source document. With ChatterPix Kids, students will slice a mouth on an image of a person and record their voice speaking through them. The video they create with this app can be used by students to explore a historical figure’s perspective or give a voice to a character in a book.

Stop Motion Studio

If you want to give students a few options when completing a research project on a topic, you might want to include Stop Motion Studio on their list.  This app lets teens create stop motion videos and is perfect for storytelling.  Your students can recreate an event from world history or show how two historical figures interacted with one another. This app gives teens the power to demonstrate their understanding of a topic while they move figurines across a tabletop.

The iPad is a wonderful creation tool that can be used throughout the content areas.  Your students can use video apps to show off what they have learned about a topic as opposed to writing traditional reports.  With these engaging apps you’ll transform how students interact with content and how you assess student understanding.

Have you used video creation apps with students?  Share your experiences below!

Monica Burns is an Education Consultant, EdTech Blogger, and Apple Distinguished Educator. Visit her site ClassTechTips.com for more ideas on how to become a tech-savvy teacher.

ChannelOne.com has lots of resources that can help students with their homework. Have you looked through the Video Library? It is full of videos that teens can use as they tackle after-school assignments. The Video Library organizes clips by “newest first” so it’s easy to find reports on important world events and hot topics. Kids can locate videos on a wide range of topics and access content related to their work in school. It’s also a great place to send students to gather information on a topic or answer questions they have about current events.

Everyday Assignments

The Video Library on ChannelOne.com can give students an overview of topics so they are better informed and ready to complete their homework. For example, if they have to write about Syria as part of a current events assignment, a quick search of the Video Library will give them a few clips to watch. Students will build their background knowledge on the subject and be ready to answer questions about chemical warfare and the political climate of the country.

Research Projects

For teens working on research projects the Video Library on ChannelOne.com can help them locate information. Students can type in a keyword in the search function or look through different categories or tags to learn more about a subject. Watching a news program that combines high quality reporting with video is a great way to help students stay informed on a subject. It will keep them interested in the topic while they make sense of the information they’ve gathered from other sources. When assigning a research report to students you can require them to include video clips in their bibliography to show that they were able to use a variety of sources. EasyBib.com has a guide for citing video clips like the ones featured on ChannelOne.com.

Flipped Learning

Many teachers are exploring the idea of the flipped classroom and the Video Library at ChannelOne.com can help educators choose the right clips to assign to students. In the flipped classroom model, teachers assign videos for students to watch at home so when they come to class they are prepared to talk about the subject. These clips can include lectures, tutorials or any media that presents content. Teachers can assign ChannelOne.com news clips for kids to watch at home or during a free period as part of their homework. If this happens outside of the classroom, teachers can use their face-to-face time with students for whole group discussions, group work and partner activities.

Video Transcripts

Each clip in the ChannelOne.com Video Library includes a full transcript from that segment. Videos offer a unique way to learn about a subject and the transcript will help teens follow along and learn new vocabulary words by reviewing them in context. The ability to pause a clip to take notes or refer to the transcript included with each video post will help students as they get ready to write and report about a topic.

Have you asked students to watch videos at home? How has the Video Library fit into your student’s afterschool routine? Share your story in the comments section.

Monica Burns is an Education Consultant, EdTech Blogger, and Apple Distinguished Educator. Visit her site ClassTechTips.com for more ideas on how to become a tech-savvy teacher.

Men’s basketball teams from several U.S. universities, including Oregon State, Clemson and Arizona, were in Barcelona, Spain, when a van drove into pedestrians Thursday in a historic district popular with tourists but school officials said the players and staff were safe.

Oregon State coach Wayne Tinkle posted a somber video to social media that conveyed the gravity of what had taken place just outside the Beavers’ team hotel. Players were sharing a meal before an exhibition game when the incident occurred, about 5 p.m. local time, he said.

“People, mad scramble, a car/van driving through,” Tinkle said. “Literally looking out the window, we won’t show you the pictures, but some horrific sights.”

Spanish police have confirmed they are investigating the bloodshed in the historic Las Ramblas district as a terror attack. The area is a popular summer tourist spot and several of the teams were staying in the area.

College basketball teams are allowed to travel internationally during the summer once every four years. They are allowed to practice for 10 days and usually play a few exhibition games while abroad.

The trips offer teams a chance to get a jumpstart on the season and also give the players a unique cultural experience.

Oregon State was staying in the same hotel as Clemson, which had been scheduled to play Thursday night against a Spanish All-Star team. Clemson coach Brad Brownell confirmed in a text to The Associated Press that everyone was well.

“We are fine. Thankful to be safe and together,” Brownell wrote.

Clemson officials said in a statement: “We’ve been in contact with our men’s basketball program currently in Barcelona and the entire travel party is safe and secure. Their exhibition game for tonight has been cancelled and the team will return to Clemson as previously scheduled tomorrow morning. Our thoughts are with the people of Barcelona.”

The Beavers’ game Thursday night was also canceled. Oregon State said it has not yet determined the remaining schedule for the team, which was supposed to be on the exhibition tour until Aug. 25.

Jeff Macy, Oregon State’s associate athletic director for sports performance, was separated from his wife, Barb, when the alleged attack occurred. He posted a statement on Twitter that she is spending the night with a local shopkeeper’s family because no one is allowed to come to the team hotel.

“Even in these tragic times the beautiful people of Barcelona have opened their arms, hearts and now homes to protect their guests and comfort us during their dire time. What we saw today can never be unseen, but I will forever be grateful for what the people of Barcelona have done for us,” Macy wrote. “Of course most importantly our prayers go out to the victims and their loved ones.”

A spokesman for Arizona said the Wildcats have canceled the third and final exhibition of their tour and “are currently working on travel plans to return home.”

Tulane was also among the teams in Barcelona, staying at a hotel away from the deadly attack. The Grand Canyon University Antelopes were also playing there.

Tulane athletic director Troy Dannen confirmed via social media that the Green Wave players and staff were safe. The team planned to return as scheduled to the United States on Saturday.

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AP Sports Writers Pete Iacobelli, John Marshall and Brett Martel contributed to this report.