ATLANTA (AP) — Isaiah Thomas scored 13 of his 28 points in the fourth quarter, Al Horford made a triumphant return and the Boston Celtics snapped the Atlanta Hawks’ seven-game winning streak with a 103-101 victory Friday night.

Paul Millsap and Tim Hardaway Jr. each had 23 points for Atlanta. The Hawks had won 12 of 16 to move into fourth place in the Eastern Conference.

But the third-place Celtics hit 17 3-pointers and got a season-high 26 points from reserve forward Kelly Olynyk to push past a Hawks team that missed too many open looks from the perimeter.

Horford, a fan favorite during his nine seasons in Atlanta, was booed many times throughout the night after leaving the team as a free agent last summer. He received a standing ovation, though, and waved happily to the crowd after the Hawks showed a brief video tribute between the first and second quarters.

Horford finished with 10 points, six rebounds and six assists in 35 minutes.

WASHINGTON (AP) — Donald Trump’s inaugural welcome concert next week will feature country star Toby Keith, singer Jennifer Holliday and actor Jon Voight, organizers announced Friday.

The names add some celebrity flavor to an inaugural lineup that so far has been noticeably short on star power, with organizers insisting that Trump himself is the celebrity in chief for this inaugural.

Also performing at Thursday’s “Make America Great Again! Welcome Celebration:” southern rockers 3 Doors Down, The Piano Guys, Lee Greenwood, DJ RaviDrums and The Frontmen of Country, featuring Tim Rushlow, Larry Stewart and Richie McDonald.

“We’re going to do something incredible,” Trump said in a tweeted video promoting the concert. “That’s going to be really fantastic.”

Trump himself also will speak at the concert at the Lincoln Memorial, which organizers said “will serve as a tribute to one of our greatest attributes, the peaceful transition of partisan power.”

Several prominent entertainers have declined to perform at the Trump inaugural, citing disagreement with the president-elect’s agenda and style.

Holliday, who supported Hillary Clinton in the election, cast her decision to participate not as a political statement but as a way to welcome the American people to an event that should be about unifying the country. She said she has sung for both Republican and Democratic presidents, and that may be why Trump’s team reached out to her, joking that they couldn’t get an “A-lister, so they went to the bottom of the list.”

“I didn’t see it as singing for Trump; I saw it as singing for the people on the mall,” she said in an interview.

Holliday, best known for her Tony-winning role in “Dreamgirls” on Broadway, faced an immediate and angry backlash to her decision from critics urging a boycott of her music, calling her an “Uncle Tom,” saying her career was over and even suggesting she take her own life.

“It just really made my heart drop to my feet,” Holliday said. “How could I have this much hate spewing at me, and I haven’t even done anything? I guess it’s not like those old days when political views were your own and you had freedom of speech. … We live in a different time now and a decision to go and do something for America is not so clear-cut anymore.”

The celebrity wattage for Trump’s inaugural festivities doesn’t rival that of Barack Obama’s inaugurations, which attracted top names including Beyonce, Bruce Springsteen, U2, Alicia Keys, Kelly Clarkson, Eva Longoria and Jennifer Hudson, among others. But Trump has insisted that’s how he wants it, saying the swearing-in festivities should be about the people not the elites.

Greenwood, whose signature song is “God Bless the U.S.A.,” has performed for past GOP presidential inaugurals. Voight has been a vocal Trump supporter.

Those set to perform at Trump’s Jan. 20 swearing-in ceremony include singer Jackie Evancho, the Radio City Rockettes and the Mormon Tabernacle Choir.

Evancho, who has caught some criticism for agreeing to perform at the inaugural, said she hoped her performance will “bring people together.”

“I hope to just kind of make everyone forget about rivals and politics for a second and just think about America and the pretty song that I’m singing,” Evancho said in an interview to air Sunday on “CBS This Morning.”

The 16-year-old singer rejected the idea she was tacitly accepting Trump’s agenda or intolerance for LGBT rights by agreeing to perform. Her sister, Juliet Evancho, was born Jacob and is transgender.

Juliet Evancho told CBS that her sister was “singing for our country and it’s an honor for her to be singing in front of so many people.”

“I feel that’s really where I look at it,” Juliet said. “And that’s where I’m going to leave it right now.”

Singer Paul Anka, meanwhile, told TMZ he’d been in talks with the Trump team about singing “My Way” for the new president at an inaugural ball, with lyrics tailored to Trump, but that he had to scrap the plan because of family commitments. Anka, 75, said “My Way” was Trump’s favorite song.

Thursday’s “welcome celebration” is a free concert that also will feature fireworks and military bands. It will be available for live broadcast.

Prior to that concert, a separate “Voices of the People” program at the Lincoln Memorial will feature groups from around the country that applied to take part in the inauguration, such as high school bands, Cub Scouts, local choirs and pipe and drum groups.

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Follow Nancy Benac on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/nbenac

WALTERBORO, S.C. (AP) — Stolen from a hospital just hours after she was born, an 18-year-old woman finally learned her true identity and was reunited Friday with her birth family, by video chat. The woman she thought was her mother was charged with her kidnapping.

Thanks to DNA analysis, the 18-year-old now knows her birth name: Kamiyah Mobley.

She’s in good health but understandably overwhelmed, Jacksonville Sheriff Mike Williams said.

Gloria Williams, 51, was arrested at her home in Walterboro, South Carolina, early Friday on charges of kidnapping and interference with custody.

Mobley — who was raised under her given name, Alexis Manigo — was allowed to spend a few emotional moments with Williams on Friday. She cried “Momma” through the caged window of a security door after Williams waived extradition to Florida, according to WXJT-TV, which posted a video online (http://bit.ly/2j9vRO5).

A much different scene was described by the young woman’s birth family. They cried “tears of joy” after a detective told them their baby had been found. Within hours Friday, they were able to reconnect over FaceTime.

“She looks just like her daddy,” her paternal grandmother, Velma Aiken of Jacksonville, told The Associated Press after they were able to see each other for the first time. “She act like she been talking to us all the time. She told us she’d be here soon to see us.”

Mobley was only eight hours old when she was taken from her young mother by a woman posing as a nurse at University Medical Center. A massive search ensued, with helicopters circling the hospital and the city on high alert. Thousands of tips came in over the years, but she had disappeared.

All that time, Kamiyah’s neighbors in Walterboro knew her as Gloria Williams’ daughter.

“She wasn’t an abused child or a child who got in trouble. But she grew up with a lie for 18 years,” Joseph Jenkins, who lives across the street, told the AP.

Some months ago, the young woman “had an inclination” that she may have been kidnapped, the sheriff said. Authorities didn’t say why she suspected this.

The case broke thanks to a tip received by the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, said Robert Lowery, a center vice president. He would not say from whom the tip came.

But the center soon reached out to the cold case detectives at the sheriff’s office, and Mobley provided a swab of her cheek for DNA analysis that proved the match, the sheriff said.

“This was something brand new to all of us,” said Tesha Stephens, a cousin of Williams’, who spoke to reporters outside their home Friday evening.

The center has tracked 308 infant abductions since 1983 by nonfamily members in the U.S. Of those cases, 12 were still missing at the end of last month. That’s now one number smaller.

“Right now she’s holding up,” Stephens said. “She’s processing everything and she’s probably going to have to take this day-by-day.”

The woman has been provided with counseling, the sheriff said. Meanwhile, Aiken is thrilled to know that they can speak with each other as much as they want.

“I always prayed, ‘Don’t let me die before I see my grandbaby’,” said Aiken. “My prayer was answered.”

The family never forgot the little girl ripped from her mother’s arms that day in 1998.

Her mother, Shanara Mobley, told the Florida Times-Union newspaper on the 10th anniversary of the kidnapping that on every one of Kamiyah’s birthdays, she wrapped a piece of birthday cake in foil and stuck it in her freezer.

“It’s stressful to wake up every day, knowing that your child is out there and you have no way to reach her or talk to her,” Mobley told the paper in 2008.

News moved quickly through the community of about 5,100 people early Friday after police cars swarmed Williams’ home. Joseph Jenkins said he awoke to see officers searching the house and the shed around back.

“At the fish market, the hair dresser, the gas station, they’re all talking about it,” said Ruben Boatwright, who said he’s known Williams for about 15 years.

Lakeshia Jenkins, Joseph’s wife, said Williams and the girl would often come over for cookouts in the yard, or join their family at a nearby water park. Kamiyah seemed to be well cared for, and “Ms. Williams, she seemed like a normal person,” Jenkins said.

“She went to work, came back here and went to church every Sunday,” she said.

Williams also worked for the Department of Veterans Affairs’ hospital in Charleston, volunteered in the area for Habitat for Humanity and lead the youth program at a Methodist church, she said.

“She’s very intelligent, smart as a whip,” Boatwright said. “All I can say are good things about her.”

The center’s Lowery said this case shines a beacon to many other parents still missing children.

“We have a lot of parents out there looking for their children, and have been for many years, and this provides them with additional hope that one day they may find their child,” he said.

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Follow Jason Dearen on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/JHDearen

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This story has been corrected to show the date of the kidnapping was 1998, not 1988.

WASHINGTON (AP) — The inauguration of a new president requires the recitation of a 35-word oath. That’s it. Dress it up with some hoopla and glitz, though, and pretty soon you’re talking real money.

Donald Trump will have it to spend.

Trump’s Presidential Inaugural Committee has raised a record $90 million-plus in private donations, far more than President Barack Obama’s two inaugural committees. They collected $55 million in 2009 and $43 million in 2013, and had some left over on the first go-round.

But while Trump has raised more money for his inauguration than any president in history, he’s aiming to do less with it. Lead inaugural planner Tom Barrack said this week the Trump team wants to avoid a “circus-like atmosphere” in favor of a more “back to work” mindset that surrounds Trump “with the soft sensuality of the place.”

Trump’s committee has declined to provide details on how it’s aiming to spend its hefty bankroll. Steve Kerrigan, CEO for Obama’s inaugural committee in 2013 and chief of staff in 2009, said the $90 million fundraising haul looks like overkill.

“I can’t imagine how they are going to spend that amount of money — and why they would even keep raising money,” he said. “We planned the two largest inaugurations in the history of our country and we never spent anywhere near that.”

Trump this week promised a “very, very elegant day” with “massive crowds.” They’ll arrive to find a party that isn’t nearly as involved as Obama’s.

Trump is holding three inaugural balls; Obama had 10 balls at his first inaugural. Trump’s team also hopes to keep its parade to 90 minutes. The longest parade, with 73 bands and 59 floats, lasted more than four and half hours, at Dwight Eisenhower’s first inauguration, in 1953.

The president-elect’s inaugural team has also failed to attract the kind of A-list performers who turned out in force for Obama. Trump’s announced headliners are teen singer Jackie Evancho, the Mormon Tabernacle Choir and the Radio City Rockettes.

Spokesman Boris Epshteyn said the inaugural committee is “fully focused on organizing world-class events that honor our nation’s tremendous history and reach every corner of the globe.” Any excess money raised will be donated to charity.

Obama used his excess inaugural dollars to help pay for the White House Easter egg roll and other events in his first term, Kerrigan said. Trump hasn’t specified what charities might benefit from any leftovers, but some of his past pledges to donate to charity haven’t always immediately panned out.

Trump’s committee has 90 days after the inauguration to reveal its donors, although some presidents have reported donations as they came in. A few contributors already are known. Among corporate donors, Boeing has given $1 million and Chevron, $500,000. AT&T says it has made both cash and in-kind donations, including quintupling phone capacity on the National Mall.

Alex Howard, deputy director of the private Sunlight Foundation, said the Trump inaugural committee is a “major vector for corporations and individuals who wish to make donations and have influence on the presidency.” He said the big donations and the lack of speedy disclosure “set a tone” that has implications for the transparency and accountability of the new president.

To be sure, the inaugural lineup of balls, parade, reviewing stands, concert, dinners, bleachers and all the rest doesn’t come cheap.

John Liipfert, who helped produce the Obama inaugurals, said big outdoor events in winter are particularly expensive, requiring robust sound and video systems, warming tents, fencing, barricades, security screeners and much more. As for the balls, halls must be rented, stages built, lighting systems constructed and draperies and floral arrangements brought in to dress up the decor.

“You’d be amazed,” he said. “There are a million factors going into it.”

And don’t forget all those portable toilets. There were 1,100 along the parade route in 2013.

While a big share of the cost is covered by the private donations, taxpayers provide a considerable amount as well. They’re on the hook, for example, to cover the close to $5 million cost of building the bunting-decorated 10,000 square-foot platform built on the West Front of the Capitol for the swearing-in.

The public also pays security costs for an event that brings together a big chunk of the U.S. political leadership, hundreds of thousands of ordinary Americans and a fair share of protesters. Because those expenses are scattered throughout the federal budget, it’s hard to get a fix on just how much the day will cost.

Some tabs are spelled out: $1.25 million for the Joint Congressional Committee on Inaugural Ceremonies, which is responsible for the swearing-in ceremony, inaugural luncheon and review of troops, and $2.5 million for overtime for U.S. Capitol Police.

More than 5,000 active duty service members and 7,500 National Guard members will take part, too. In 2009, spending by the military’s inaugural joint task force and the Defense Department totaled $21.6 million.

District of Columbia Mayor Muriel Bowser says the city expects to spend at least $30 million, with the federal government reimbursing the full amount. So far, Congress has appropriated $19 million, and the city will go back to Congress after the swearing-in to ask for the rest.

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Associated Press writers Andrew Taylor and Ben Nuckols contributed to this report.

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Follow Nancy Benac on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/nbenac

Banks led U.S. stock indexes mostly higher Friday, propelling the Nasdaq composite index to its fourth record high this week.

Investors welcomed quarterly earnings from JPMorgan Chase, Bank of America and Wells Fargo, all of which reported results that exceeded Wall Street’s expectations. Financial stocks also benefited from an upward move in bond yields, which drives higher interest rates on loans.

Real estate stocks were the biggest laggard. Shares in energy companies also closed lower as crude oil prices declined. Mixed data on U.S. retail sales weighed on department store stocks.

Friday’s crop of company earnings kicks off several weeks of corporate earnings reports, giving investors new insight into the health of Corporate America and the economy.

“We all thought financials would do well,” said J.J. Kinahan, TD Ameritrade’s chief strategist. “Now how about the other areas of the economy?”

The Dow Jones industrial average slipped 5.27 points, or 0.03 percent, to 19,885.73. The average had been up by 61 points earlier in the day. The Standard & Poor’s 500 index gained 4.20 points, or 0.2 percent, to 2,274.64. The Nasdaq added 26.63 points, or 0.5 percent, to 5,574.12. The index has set a record-high close six times this year.

Small-company stocks rose more than the rest of the market. The Russell 2000 index jumped 10.98 points, or 0.8 percent, to 1,372.05.

The major stock indexes headed higher early on in the day, as investors reacted to earnings reports from JPMorgan Chase, Bank of America and Wells Fargo. The three banking giants delivered quarterly results that exceeded Wall Street’s expectations, pushing their shares higher.

JPMorgan added 46 cents, or 0.5 percent, to $86.70. Bank of America rose 9 cents, or 0.4 percent, to $23.01. Wells Fargo gained 81 cents, or 1.5 percent, to $55.31.

Traders also reviewed the latest monthly snapshot of U.S. retail sales, which showed that sales rose 0.6 percent overall in December, mainly due to a pickup in online shopping and sales of autos and gasoline.

“If you back out gasoline increasing and auto sales increasing, it’s not an impressive number,” Kinahan said.

The retail sales report weighed down shares of several department store chains and clothing brands. By early afternoon, the market had begun to give up some of its gains.

PVH Corp., home to Calvin Klein, Tommy Hilfiger and other clothing brands, slid $3.82, or 4.1 percent, to $89.31. Nordstrom fell 83 cents, or 1.8 percent, to $44.20. Gap shed 34 cents, or 1.4 percent, to $23.66.

Traders also had their eye on companies that issued outlooks for their upcoming earnings reports.

Pandora Media climbed 6.3 percent after the streaming music company issued a strong revenue forecast. The company also said it will cut about 7 percent of its jobs to reduce costs. The stock added 76 cents to $12.765.

HomeStreet fell 6 percent after the real estate lender forecast disappointing fourth-quarter results. It took in fewer mortgage applications as interest rates began rising. The stock slid $1.85 to $29.10.

GameStop tumbled 8.1 percent after the video game retailer said holiday revenue dropped because of discounts and weak sales of new “Call of Duty” and “Titanfall” games. The stock shed $1.99 to $22.73.

Energy prices were mixed.

Benchmark crude oil fell 64 cents, or 1.2 percent, to close at $52.37 a barrel in New York. Brent crude, which is used to price oil sold internationally, slid 56 cents, or 1 percent, to close at $55.45 a barrel in London.

The slide in crude prices helped pull down shares in energy sector stocks.

Oilfield services company Baker Hughes slid $1.50, or 2.4 percent, to $60.92, while drilling services company Transocean lost 36 cents, or 2.3 percent, to $15.48. Marathon Petroleum fell 87 cents, or 1.8 percent, to $48.38.

In other energy trading, wholesale gasoline was little changed at $1.61 a gallon, while heating oil slipped 2 cents to $1.65 a gallon. Natural gas futures gained 3 cents, or 1 percent, to $3.42 per 1,000 cubic feet.

Major stock indexes in Europe closed higher.

Germany’s DAX rose 0.9 percent, while France’s CAC 40 gained 1.2 percent. Britain’s FTSE 100 added 0.6 percent.

Earlier in Asia, some markets finished lower on disappointing trade data from China. Hong Kong’s Hang Seng index gained 0.5 percent. Japan’s Nikkei 225 index rose 0.8 percent. South Korea’s Kospi fell 0.5 percent, while Australia’s S&P/ASX 200 slumped 0.8 percent.

Bond prices fell. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note rose to 2.39 percent from 2.36 percent late Thursday.

In currency trading, the dollar fell to 114.42 yen from 114.63 yen on Thursday. The euro strengthened to $1.0646 from $1.0626.

The price of gold fell $3.60 to $1,196.20 an ounce. Silver slid 6 cents to $16.77 an ounce. Copper rose 2 cents to $2.69 a pound.

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Friday:

JPMorgan Chase & Co., up 46 cents to $86.70

The largest U.S. bank by assets said its profit jumped thanks to higher interest rates and strong trading results.

Bank of America Corp., up 9 cents to $23.01

The company said its quarterly profit jumped thanks to higher interest rates and lower expenses related to bad loans.

Pandora Media Inc., up 76 cents to $12.76

The streaming music company gave a strong fourth-quarter revenue projection and said it will cut 7 percent of its jobs.

DexCom Inc., up $17.52 to $85.13

The company said Medicare will cover its blood glucose monitoring system for diabetes patients.

GameStop Corp., down $1.99 to $22.73

The video game retailer said holiday revenue dropped because of discounts and weak sales of new “Call of Duty” and “Titanfall” games.

Regions Financial Corp., up 25 cents to $14.68

Banks climbed Thursday following strong earnings and a jump in bond yields and interest rates.

HomeStreet Inc., down $1.85 to $29.10

The real estate lender forecast disappointing fourth-quarter results as mortgage applications dropped because of rising interest rates.

Southern Co., down 20 cents to $48.80

Big dividend payers, including utilities, traded lower Friday as rising bond yields attracted investors’ attention.