Tattoo artist and reality show star Kat Von D has cut business ties with makeup artist Jeffree Star.

In a YouTube video , Von D says she’s ended her business relationship with Star because he refused to pay for logos designed by a mutual friend and used on Star’s products.

She said in an Instagram post that she’s also pulling the shade “Jeffree” from her makeup collection.

Von D has starred on a pair of tattoo-themed TLC reality shows, “Miami Ink” and “L.A. Ink.”

Star responded on Snapchat, saying Kat Von D’s statements were “full of some really interesting lies and some propaganda.”

NEW YORK (AP) — New York City Police Commissioner William Bratton says shots being fired at someone else missed two nearby police officers in Brooklyn.

The Sergeants Benevolent Association initially said four males drove past the officers Tuesday night and fired before fleeing.

Bratton said Wednesday that investigators reviewed video and determined that someone else was the intended target.

The department has taken extra precautions since the recent killings of police officers in Dallas and other places.

CLEVELAND (AP) — Cementing an extraordinary political takeover, Republicans nominated Donald Trump Tuesday night as their presidential standard-bearer, hitching their hopes of keeping Democrat Hillary Clinton out of the White House on an unorthodox candidate who has sown divisions within the party and across the nation.

While it was Trump’s night, Clinton was frequently the focus.

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie energized the crowd with a full-throated takedown of Clinton, imploring delegates to shout “Guilty!” as he ticked through numerous accusations of wrongdoing.

Trump addressed the convention briefly in videotaped remarks, thanking them for formally nominating him as the party’s White House candidate. “

“This is a movement, but we have to go all the way,” he said.

For Trump, the celebrations were a much-needed opportunity to regroup after a chaotic convention kickoff that included a plagiarism charge involving wife Melania Trump’s address on opening night. There were no big missteps Tuesday, but the event was void of the glitzy, Hollywood touch Trump promised, with a series of Republican officials parading on stage to level sharp, but repetitive, criticisms of Clinton.

The evening’s program ended on an unusual note, with an actress-turned-avocado farmer delivering the closing speech — a spot normally reserved for prominent speakers.

Trump’s family again took center stage, underscoring the campaign’s urgent task to reshape the image of a candidate seen by large swaths of voters as harsh and divisive. Two of Trump’s children testified to his character, casting him as a man undeterred by challenges.

“For my father, impossible is just the starting point,” said Donald Trump Jr., the oldest of the Republican nominee’s five children. Questions about plagiarism surfaced for a second day in a row, this time in the eldest son’s speech. But F.H. Buckley, the writer behind the original work in question this time — an article in The American Conservative — said he was a principal speechwriter for the younger Trump and said the campaign did nothing wrong.

For some Republicans, the night also offered a glimpse of what could have been. House Speaker Paul Ryan, who resisted calls to jump into the presidential race, made a vigorous call for party unity — though his message focused more on the risks of letting Democrats keep the White House and make gains in Congress than a rationale for Trump.

“Let’s compete in every part of America, and turn out at the polls like every last vote matters, because it will,” Ryan said.

Many Republican leaders stayed away from the convention, still wary of being associated with the divisive candidate and unsure how his nomination impacts their own political futures.

The crowd gathered in the cavernous convention hall reflected the growing dissatisfaction among some Republicans with party elites. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, who has been a lukewarm supporter of Trump, was greeted with a smattering of boos as he took the stage.

It was one of the occasional flurries of dissent on the convention floor, including jeers as states that Trump did not win recorded their votes during the nominating roll call vote. Still, Trump far outdistanced his primary rivals, and his vice presidential pick, Indiana Gov. Mike Pence, was also formally nominated.

Trump was put over the top by his home state of New York. Four of his children joined the state’s delegation on the convention floor for the historic moment and appeared overwhelmed with emotion.

Tiffany Trump, the candidate’s 22-year-old daughter with ex-wife Marla Maples, sprinkled her remarks with rarely heard anecdotes about her father, including the handwritten notes he left on her childhood report cards.

“My dad is a natural born encourager, the last person to ever tell you to lower your sights,” she said.

Melania Trump was praised for making progress in highlighting her husband’s personal qualities during her Monday night address. She spoke of his “simple goodness” and his loyalty and love of family — while noting the “drama” that comes with Trump in politics.

But her speech was quickly overtaken by charges that it included two passages— each 30 words or longer — that matched a 2008 Democratic convention address by Michelle Obama nearly word-for-word.

Trump’s campaign offered no apologies, with top adviser Paul Manafort telling The Associated Press the matter had been “totally blown out of proportion.”

Still, the plagiarism controversy and other unforced errors by the campaign cast a shadow over the convention and raised fresh questions about Trump’s oversight of his campaign, which gives voters a window into how a candidate might handle the pressures of the presidency.

Clinton pounced on the tumult, saying the Republican gathering had so far been “surreal,” comparing it to the classic fantasy film “Wizard of Oz.”

“When you pull back the curtain, it was just Donald Trump with nothing to offer to the American people,” Clinton said during a speech in Las Vegas.

Trump’s campaign did succeed in tamping down late efforts by dissident delegates to derail the convention, including during Tuesday’s roll call vote. Campaign officials invested significant time arguing to delegates about the importance of presenting a unite front during the televised convention.

“United we stand, divided we fall,” said Johnny McMahan, a Trump delegate from Arkansas.

But Colorado’s Kendal Unruh, a leader of the anti-Trump forces, called the convention a “sham” and warned party leaders that their efforts to silence opposition would keep some Republicans on the sidelines in the fall campaign against Clinton.

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What political news is the world searching for on Google and talking about on Twitter? Find out via AP’s Election Buzz interactive. http://elections.ap.org/buzz

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AP writers Jonathan Lemire, Kathleen Hennessey and Steve Peoples contributed to this report.

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Follow Julie Pace at http://twitter.com/jpaceDC

CHICAGO (AP) — Jeurys Familia lost control, but not the lead, and kept the Mets ahead and his consecutive save streak intact.

New York’s closer escaped a bases-loaded jam with a game-ending double play after Rene Rivera drove in the tiebreaking run with two outs in the top of the ninth, lifting New York over the Chicago Cubs 2-1 on Tuesday night.

Familia walked Addison Russell and Miguel Montero to start the ninth, then Javier Baez reached on a bunt single when third baseman Jose Reyes threw wide to first. Pinch-hitter Matt Szczur hit a grounder to first baseman James Loney, and Loney threw out Russell at the plate.

Kris Bryant then hit into a 5-4-3 double play to give Familia his 33rd save in 33 chances this season and 49th straight dating to Aug. 1, 2015.

“I just always try in a situation like that, to throw my sinker down and let them make contact with a groundball and believe in myself,” Familia said. “I just try to believe and think I can do it.”

Familia’s teammates kept their cool, too

“I know Familia is going to do it,” catcher Rivera said. “I know he has been there before. After the first couple of batters, I went out there and gave him support.”

Rivera had the third single in the ninth — following hits by Loney and Asdrubal Cabrera — off Hector Rondon (1-2) as the Mets beat the Cubs for the fifth time in six games after sweeping them in last year’s NL Championship Series.

Hansel Robles (4-3) pitched two scoreless innings in relief for the win.

All-Star right-handers Jake Arrieta of the Cubs and Noah Syndergaard of the Mets returned to dominant form in no decisions.

Arrieta retired 14 of the first 15 Mets hitters, including 12 straight following Yoenis Cespedes’ single in the first. He allowed one run and struck out eight in seven innings, his longest outing since June 11. Last year’s NL Cy Young Award winner got back on track after allowing four or more earned runs in three consecutive starts for the first time since 2012.

“That was a little more like it,” Arrieta said. “I was really aggressive in the strike zone and I was using my off-speed pretty much throughout the whole game.”

Syndergaard gave up one unearned run on seven hits through 5 2/3 innings. He struck out eight before being replaced by Jerry Blevins after throwing 105 pitches.

Syndergaard had his velocity early, reaching 100 mph in the first inning, and was able to escape jams in the first and second. He left in the fifth inning of his previous start, on July 8, with arm fatigue after allowing three runs in a loss to Washington.

“It was great to come in here and squeeze out a win against their ace,” Syndergaard said. “My arm felt really loose and fluid even later in the game.”

New York’s Michael Conforto made his first start, in right field, since being recalled from Triple-A Las Vegas on Sunday and went 0 for 3. He had pinch-hit on Monday and singled.

Arrieta doubled with two out in the fourth, then was thrown out at the plate when he tried to score on Tommy La Stella’s single. At first, Arrieta was ruled safe by umpire Eric Cooper, but he was called out following a video review.

CONFORTO FACTOR

Mets manager Terry Collins is concerned about overloading Conforto too soon after his recall, so he started the 23-year-old in right field and Curtis Granderson in center on Tuesday with the wind blowing in at Wrigley Field. Conforto may see time in center in the future, though.

Conforto got off to a nice start with the Mets but was sent down on June 25 after a prolonged slump.

“This kid got sent out because he wasn’t hitting,” Collins said before the game. “He gets his swing back and comes up and the first thing that hits him in the face is to play center field. So we’re going to ease him into it.”

RIGHT ANGLE

Both Collins and Chicago manager Joe Maddon loaded their starting lineups with lefties against two of the major’s premier right-handed starters.

Maddon called out the split against Syndergaard as “enormously different.” Righties entered hitting .210 against him, lefties were batting .282. Against Arrieta, righties were hitting .182, lefties were at .215.

TRAINER’S ROOM

Mets: The team said RHP Matt Harvey was resting comfortably after having season-ending surgery for thoracic outlet surgery in St. Louis on Monday.

Cubs: All-Star 2B Ben Zobrist batted fourth after getting two days off. … OFs Dexter Fowler (right hamstring strain) and Jorge Soler (left hamstring strain) had the start of their rehab stints at Triple-A pushed back a day when the Iowa Cubs were rained out. Maddon said both were close to returning, but he “didn’t know exactly.”

UP NEXT

RHP Bartolo Colon (8-4, 3.11) squares off against Chicago RHP Kyle Hendricks (8-6, 2.41) in the series finale on Wednesday afternoon. Hendricks allowed just three hits in six shutout innings in his last start against Texas on Friday and has a 1.70 ERA in his last 11 outings.

Donald Trump officially won the Republican Party’s presidential nomination Tuesday, making the businessman the GOP standard-bearer after a rollicking primary season that saw him vanquish 16 rivals.

The roll call vote of states gave Trump enough delegates at the Republican National Convention to win the nomination after months of speculation and dissent among the GOP ranks. There was little opposition on the floor as delegates cast votes for Trump state by state.

The vote came on the second day of the Cleveland convention, where the theme was billed as “Make America Work Again.” Though the focus was supposed to be jobs, speakers spent more time denouncing presumptive Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton. She was talked about more than Trump himself.

House Speaker Paul Ryan said Clinton represents a third term of Barack Obama’s presidency instead of the “clean break from a failed system.” Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., said Clinton has “a tortured relationship to the truth.”

Trump himself briefly appeared in a videotaped statement: “This is a movement, but we have to go all the way,” he said.

What to know about the second day of the convention:

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THE NOMINATION

The boisterous roll call featured officials bragging about their states, per tradition, and enthusiastically declaring Trump the winner of their delegates. New York put him over the top in the delegate count, with Trump’s son Donald Jr. delivering that state’s results.

Texas Sen. Ted Cruz’s name wasn’t formally placed in nomination even though he was closest to Trump in the primaries. Earlier Tuesday, some Republicans were saying Cruz’s supporters wanted to gather enough signatures to allow the Texan to be nominated.

Being officially nominated means a candidate is entitled to have supporters deliver a nominating and seconding speech. But Trump’s campaign and GOP officials eager for a show of unity behind Trump worked to head that off.

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THE SPEECHES

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, a former federal prosecutor, laid out an aggressive case against Clinton, asking the crowd to weigh in on her leadership on the Islamic State group, China, and an al-Qaida-linked group in Nigeria. Riled up, the crowd yelled “Lock her up! Lock her up!”

Failed Republican presidential candidate Ben Carson went so far as to associate Clinton with Lucifer.

While politicians at the podium heaped criticism on Clinton, Trump’s children made direct appeals in favor of Trump. Tiffany Trump, the candidate’s 22-year-old daughter from his marriage to Marla Maples, said her father is a “natural-born encourager” who has motivated her to work her hardest.

Donald Trump Jr., his eldest son and an executive vice president at The Trump Organization, cited his father’s business acumen and said his father approaches business projects the same way he has approached his campaign and life in general.

Speakers also included some unknown names, such as Andy Wist, founder and CEO of a waterproofing company in the Bronx, as well as Dana White, president of the popular Ultimate Fighting Championship, which promotes mixed martial arts.

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CLINTON WEIGHS IN

Clinton said the first day of the Republican gathering had been “surreal,” comparing it to the classic fantasy film “Wizard of Oz.”

“When you pull back the curtain, it was just Donald Trump with nothing to offer to the American people,” Clinton said during a speech in Las Vegas.

After the roll call, Clinton tweeted a fundraising appeal: “Donald Trump just became the Republican nominee. Chip in now to make sure he never steps foot in the Oval Office.”

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MONDAY NIGHT HANGOVER

Trump’s wife, Melania, received criticism because her speech Monday included two passages with similarities to a speech first lady Michelle Obama delivered at the 2008 Democratic convention. Mrs. Trump’s speech was well received in the convention hall.

Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort called the criticism “just absurd” and said the issue had been “totally blown out of proportion.”

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OUTSIDE THE HALL

Police broke up scuffles between groups of demonstrators a few blocks from the Republican National Convention as crowds in the hundreds gathered Tuesday afternoon.

There were no arrests, police said, despite several tense moments that saw officers step in between protesters pushing and shouting at each other during some of the biggest, most raucous gatherings in downtown Cleveland since the four-day convention began on Monday.

One skirmish broke out when right-wing conspiracy theorist and radio show host Alex Jones started speaking in downtown’s Public Square through a bullhorn. Police on bicycles pushed back a surging crowd, and Jones was whisked away.

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THE REST OF THE WEEK

Vice presidential pick Mike Pence, the Indiana governor, is set to speak Wednesday. Cruz, who has not yet endorsed Trump, is set to speak too. Trump will close the convention with an acceptance speech Thursday night.

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What political news is the world searching for on Google and talking about on Twitter? Find out via AP’s Election Buzz interactive. http://elections.ap.org/buzz

CLEVELAND (AP) — The Latest on the Republican National Convention (all times EDT):

10:15 p.m.

Donald Trump’s son Donald Jr. is citing his father’s business acumen and says that for his father, “impossible is just the starting point.”

The younger Trump tells the delegates at the Republican National Convention that his father approaches business projects the same way he has approached his campaign and life in general.

Donald Jr. says that’s why his father was able to defeat 16 other Republicans in the primary campaign, despite never having run for office.

He says the question in this election is who has the judgment to lead. He says Democrat Hilary Clinton is a risk the country can’t afford to take.

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10 p.m.

Tiffany Trump says her father, Donald Trump, is a “natural-born encourager” who’s motivated her to work her hardest.

The 22-year-old is telling the Republican National Convention about her father’s character, and recalling how he’d notes on her report cards. She says she still has them.

Tiffany Trump says the Trump way is to hold nothing back and never let fear get in the way. She says he’s the last person who’d ever tell someone to lower their sights or give up on their dream.

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9:50 p.m.

Republicans are breaking out into chants of “lock her up” as New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie tries to impugn Hillary Clinton’s character in his speech to the Republican National Convention.

Christie says as a former federal prosecutor, he wants to hold Clinton accountable for her actions. He says he’s laying out what he says are facts about her to “a jury of her peers.”

Guilty or not guilty — that’s what Christie is asking his audience for a verdict about Clinton on her leadership on the Islamic State group, China, and an al-Qaida-linked group in Nigeria.

Each time, delegates are responding with boisterous chants of “guilty.”

Republican activists repeatedly interrupted Christie with shouts of — “Lock her up.”

———

9:42 p.m.

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie says Hillary Clinton lied to the nation about “her selfish, awful judgment.” Christie — who fell short in his GOP presidential bid — says voters shouldn’t elect Clinton as president and reward what he calls her incompetence.

Christie is firmly behind Republican nominee Donald Trump — and says he’s been friends with Trump for 14 years.

Christie tells the Republican National Convention that Clinton’s performance as secretary of state was dismal. He says voters should hold her accountable for failures in Libya, Syria and elsewhere.

Christie says Clinton also is responsible for a bad nuclear deal with Iran.

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9:42 p.m.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says scandal follows Hillary Clinton and former President Bill Clinton “like flies.”

McConnell is using his speech to the Republican National Convention to rip into the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee.

The Kentucky senator says he’s spent more time around the Clintons than anyone should ever have to spend.

McConnell says he’s disagreed with President Barack Obama, but that at least Obama was upfront about his intentions “to move America to the left.”

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9:40 p.m.

Former Republican presidential candidate Ben Carson says Hillary Clinton is promoting a “new world order” that would allow the government in Washington to trample Americans’ freedoms.

The retired neurosurgeon is set to tell delegates at the Republican National Committee that Clinton will push what he’s calling “cancerous policies” that perpetuate poverty.

Carson says Clinton would appoint liberal Supreme Court justices who would cement those policies.

Carson — in excerpts of his prepared remarks — says Donald Trump would preserve the “ideals upon which this country was founded.”

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9:25 p.m.

House Speaker Paul Ryan says he’ll be sharing the rostrum with “President Donald Trump” the next time there’s a State of the Union address on Capitol Hill.

Ryan hesitated for a while before finally endorsing the businessman last month. The Wisconsin lawmaker tells the Republican National Convention that only by electing Trump and running mate Mike Pence does the country “have a chance at a better way.”

He says Hillary Clinton represents a third term of what he’s calling President Barack Obama’s failed presidency.

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9:20 p.m.

Republican congressional leaders are assuring party delegates that having Donald Trump in the White House will help achieve key GOP legislative objectives.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says Trump will sign bills to repeal President Barack Obama’s health care law, build the Keystone pipeline and deny Planned Parenthood any federal money.

McConnell and House Speaker Paul Ryan also are delivering broadsides against Hillary Clinton and her fellow Democrats.

McConnell says Clinton has “a tortured relationship to the truth.”

Ryan says Clinton represents a third term of Obama’s presidency instead of the “clean break from a failed system” that many Americans want.

The Wisconsin Republican says next week’s Democratic convention will be a “four-day infomercial of politically correct moralizing.”

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9:05 p.m.

Donald Trump says he’s proud to be the Republican presidential nominee.

Trump is offering his first words to the party convention after being declared the nominee. He says in a video played in the convention hall that he’s honored to have Mike Pence as his running mate and that the Indiana governor will make a “great, great vice president.”

Trump says he’ll appear with Pence in Cleveland on both Wednesday and Thursday. He says they’ll win Ohio and the presidency.

Trump is promising to bring “real change and leadership” to Washington.

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8:20 p.m.

Mystery solved at the GOP convention.

The question is why all 19 delegates from the District of Columbia were awarded to Donald Trump.

Florida Sen. Marco Rubio won the district’s convention during the primary season and Ohio Gov. John Kasich came in second. Trump didn’t win any delegates back in March.

But party rules in the district say that if only one candidate’s name is placed into nomination at the national convention, then all 19 delegates go to that candidate.

Trump was the only candidate to be nominated at the convention.

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8:15 p.m.

Mike Pence has been nominated as the Republican vice presidential candidate — and Donald Trump’s running mate.

The Indiana governor was declared the nominee by acclimation — meaning no formal roll call vote is needed. That ruling came from Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell as he presided over the party’s convention.

McConnell says Pence has the “overwhelming support of this convention” to be the next vice president.

Indiana Lt. Gov. Eric Holcomb — who put Pence’s name in nomination — says Pence has overseen record investments in education and eliminated red tape for businesses. He says under Pence’s leadership, more Indiana residents are working and the tech sector is experiencing “explosive” growth.

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8:10 p.m.

House Speaker Paul Ryan has formally declared Donald Trump the winner of the Republican presidential nomination.

Ryan says Trump received 1,725 delegates in the state-by-state roll call. Ryan says Texas Sen. Ted Cruz was the runner-up with 475 delegates. Ohio Gov. John Kasich came in third with 120 votes, followed by 113 for Florida Sen. Marco Rubio.

Fifth-place went to physician Ben Carson with seven delegates, followed by former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush with three delegates and Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul with two delegates.

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8:05 p.m.

Donald Trump is celebrating his big achievement Tuesday night: officially becoming the Republican nominee for president.

Trump has posted a tweet that it was “such a great honor” after the roll call of the states at the Republican National Convention gave him the number of delegates needed to become the GOP’s nominee.

He added: “I will work hard and never let you down! AMERICA FIRST!”

Trump is set to formally accept the nomination during a Thursday night speech at the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland.

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8 p.m.

Donald Trump may officially be the Republican nominee, but that didn’t stop at least one state from taking exception to the way its votes were counted during Tuesday night’s presidential roll call at the GOP convention.

The Alaska delegation is disputing how its votes were recorded and requesting a formal poll of its delegates. But House Speaker Paul Ryan has declared that Alaska’s 28 votes are going to Trump — who already had more delegates than he needed to win.

The dispute appeared to be over Alaska state party rules that say a candidate loses his or her delegates if the candidate’s campaign is no longer active.

All of Trump’s challengers suspended their campaigns when it became clear the New Yorker would win the nomination.

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7:55 p.m.

Not every Republican activist is so excited now that Donald Trump has clinched the party’s presidential nomination.

Colorado delegate Kendal Unruh says it’s time to “cancel the convention, stop the sham.” She says Trump has worked to coronate himself king.

Unruh is warning there could be drama and a “show of displeasure” coming on Thursday when Trump is set to speak at the convention.

Colorado cast most of its votes for Cruz.

———

7:45 p.m.

Even as they’re casting votes for John Kasich (KAY’-sihk) during the roll call of the states, numerous delegates are the Republican National Convention are still getting the Ohio governor’s last name wrong.

It rhymes with “basic.”

But at least three delegates announcing their state’s votes for the nomination pronounced the second syllable like the word “itch.”

The frequent stumbling over Kasich’s last name was something of a running joke while Kasich was competing for the Republican presidential nomination.

He dropped out in May, but still was awarded delegates at the convention because of votes he won in the primary contests.

Kasich wasn’t present for Tuesday night’s proceedings, despite the fact that the convention is taking place in his home state.

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7:35 p.m.

New Mexico’s governor refused to endorse Donald Trump after he chastised her for not doing her job when it comes to unemployment and other issues.

But there was Susana Martinez on the floor of the Republican National Convention and introducing the young delegate who announced New Mexico’s tally during the roll call of states.

Trump won the nomination Tuesday night, and New York put him over the top.

Some prominent Republicans have stayed away from the convention, but Martinez has been a visible presence in Cleveland.

Trump criticized Martinez in May at a campaign appearance in New Mexico, but later said he wanted her support. Martinez is the nation’s first female Hispanic governor.

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7:25 p.m.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is blaming what he calls are “Clinton Democrats” for a Senate standoff that’s blocked President Barack Obama’s request for money to fight the Zika virus.

Congress is now on a seven-week recess, and left Washington without acting on the Zika money. Democrats objected to a GOP proposal that would block Planned Parenthood clinics in Puerto Rico from getting money to fight the virus.

McConnell is blaming the impasses on Hillary Clinton, the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee.

The Kentucky lawmaker is speaking later Tuesday night at the convention but some of his remarks are being released beforehand.

McConnell says he wonders what Democrats “think public service is about.” He says the presidential election will answer this basic question: “Who is looking out for us?”

———

7:15 p.m.

Donald Trump’s son Donald Jr. cast the final votes his father needed to become the Republican presidential nominee.

The younger Trump was on the floor of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland and told the excited activists in the auditorium that New York was casting 89 votes for Trump and six for Ohio Gov. John Kasich.

He then shouted out: “Congratulations, Dad, we love you.”

Donald Jr. says he’s watched as his father has built a movement and he says that movement has given Americans a voice again.

Also on the convention floor are some of Donald Trump’s other children, including Eric Trump and Ivanka Trump.

Delegates on the floor broke into cheers and waved signs as the song “New York, New York” played at the Quicken Loans Arena.

———

7:10 p.m.

Make it official: The Republican Party has nominated Donald Trump for president.

And now the New York billionaire has completed a remarkable rise from political outsider to major party nominee for the White House.

New York put him over the top in the delegate count Tuesday night at the Republican National Convention.

There was a disruptive fight on Monday night over the party’s rules, but a day later that was history.

There was little drama as party delegates united behind the real estate mogul and reality TV star.