Channel One reporter Keith Kocinski shares his experiences and reflections from his trip to India.

NEWARK, N.J. (AP) — A New Jersey Institute of Technology lecturer seen on video apparently spouting anti-Semitic sentiments says his comments were taken out of context.

The Newark college has put Jason Jorjani on administrative leave, saying his statements are “antithetical” to its core values.

The video was part of a Sept. 19 New York Times opinion piece about a nonprofit group’s undercover investigation of white nationalism. It shows Jorjani discussing the return of concentration camps and foreseeing a future in which Adolf Hitler is regarded as a “great European leader.”

Jorjani says the video was edited to remove the context of the conversation about a dystopian society that would result from continuing current U.S. political practices.

Jorjani tells NJ.com his prediction was a negative warning, not an endorsement of Hitler’s politics and anti-Semitism.

CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — The New Hampshire company that makes Velcro brand fasteners hopes the message in its new marketing video will stick as well as its products.

The “Don’t Say Velcro” video features actors portraying trademark lawyers pleading with the public to respect Velcro Cos.’ brand and refer to other “scratchy, hairy” products as “hook and loop” fasteners instead of Velcro.

Velcro CEO Fraser Cameron says he wants people to know there’s a real company behind the products and there’s a difference between Velcro brand products and others in the marketplace.

Velcro was invented by a Swiss engineer in the 1940s after he studied burrs that stuck to his dog’s fur and his wool pants. It has been used on everything from spacesuits to diapers.

HARARE, Zimbabwe (AP) — Police in Zimbabwe have arrested an anti-government pastor after he circulated videos highlighting the country’s worsening economic problems.

Defense lawyer Harrison Nkomo says pastor Evan Mawarire, who last year organized the county’s biggest protests in a decade, has been charged with subversion.

Mawarire is to appear in court on Monday due to separate subversion charges linked to earlier anti-government campaigns.

The latest charges came after Mawarire posted videos that include images of long lines of people waiting for fuel. In the videos, Mawarire accuses the government of 93-year-old President Robert Mugabe of being insensitive to the problems affecting the once-prosperous southern African country.

Mawarire fled to the United States last year after his involvement in protests. He returned in February and was charged with subversion.

DENVER (AP) — A Colorado principal has retired and an athletic director has resigned after videos surfaced showing a high school cheerleading coach pushing cheerleaders down in splits.

Denver Public Schools Superintendent Tom Boasberg also on Friday released a report by a law firm that the district ordered after learning about the videos in August.

Officials have said the school administrators saw at least one of the videos in June and met with the coach. Boasberg says that wasn’t enough to protect students’ safety.

The recordings were broadcast on KUSA-TV in August, showing eight cheerleaders repeatedly being pushed into splits. In one video, a girl appears to cry out in pain and repeatedly asks her coach to “please stop.”

The former coach, Ozell Williams, was dismissed shortly after the videos became public.

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Gatorade has agreed not to make disparaging comments about water as part of a $300,000 settlement reached Thursday with California over allegations it misleadingly portrayed water’s benefits in a cellphone game where users refuel Olympic runner Usain Bolt.

The game, downloaded 30,000 times in California and 2.3 million times worldwide, is no longer available.

The dispute between the sports-drink company and California Attorney General Xavier Becerra was settled in less than a day after Becerra filed a complaint in Los Angeles County.

Becerra’s complaint alleges the game, called Bolt!, misleadingly portrayed the health benefits of water in a way that could harm children’s nutritional choices. The game encouraged users to “keep your performance level high and avoid water,” with Bolt’s fuel level going down after drinking water but up after drinking Gatorade, the complaint alleged.

The settlement should serve as a warning to companies that falsely advertise, Becerra said.

“Making misleading statements is a violation of California law. But making misleading statements aimed at our children is beyond unlawful, it’s morally wrong and a betrayal of trust,” he said in a statement.

Gatorade agreed to the settlement but has not admitted wrongdoing.

“The mobile game, Bolt!, was designed to highlight the unique role and benefits of sports drinks in supporting athletic performance. We recognize the role water plays in overall health and wellness, and offer our consumers great options,” spokeswoman Katie Vidaillet said in an email.

In addition to agreeing not to disparage water, Gatorade agreed not to make Bolt! or any other games that give the impression that water will hinder athletic performance or that athletes only consume Gatorade and do not drink water. Gatorade also agreed to use “reasonable efforts” to abide by parent company PepsiCo’s policy on responsible advertising to children and to disclose its contracts with endorsers.

Of the settlement money, $120,000 will go toward the study or promotion of childhood and teenager nutrition and the consumption of water.

The game was available in 2012 and 2013 and for a limited time in 2017.