SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Knock, knock, Google’s video chatting app has arrived.

The app, dubbed Duo, represents Google’s response to other popular video calling options, including Apple’s FaceTime, Microsoft’s Skype and Facebook’s Messenger app.

Duo isn’t much different from the other video chatting services, except that it gives a glimpse at who is making the call, helping the recipient decide whether to answer. Google calls this feature, “Knock, knock.”

The new app, announced in May, is being released Tuesday as a free service for phones running on Google’s Android operating system as well as Apple’s iPhones.

Like FaceTime for iPhones, Duo only requires a person’s phone number to connect. Many other services require both participants to have account logins to use their video calling options.

Google has been offering video calling through its Hangout feature for several years, but the internet company is now tailoring that service for business meetings.

Duo is being billed as a simpler, more reliable way to see friends and family as you talk to them.

It is the first of two new mobile apps that Google, owned by Alphabet Inc., has planned for this summer. The Mountain View, California, company also is preparing to unveil a new messaging app called Allo featuring a robotic assistant that will suggest automated responses to texts.

Police in the nation’s capital say they’re investigating videos circulating on social media that appear to show a male officer pinning a young female against a patrol car with her feet dangling several inches above the ground.

The series of videos was posted Monday via Twitter.

The Associated Press couldn’t immediately confirm the videos’ authenticity. They appeared to show the person pushed with her face toward the vehicle and an officer could be heard saying, “Yes, you did, I saw it.” The officer then puts the person down.

Metropolitan Police Department spokeswoman Rachel Schaerr told The Associated Press authorities are aware of the video, are investigating and have contacted the officer’s commander.

A police statement released no identities or races of those involved and didn’t give details of what happened.

WASHINGTON (AP) — I’ve never been part of a conspiracy theory. Now, video of my surprised facial expression has become Exhibit A in the latest unfounded speculation about Hillary Clinton.

It starts with Clinton’s visit to a muffin shop in Washington on June 10, five days before the District of Columbia’s Democratic primary. The then-presumptive Democratic nominee popped in for a photo op with Mayor Muriel Bowser and other officials supporting her campaign.

As an Associated Press reporter who’s spent more than a year covering her candidacy, I was there for her appearance. After she ordered herself a “cold chai,” my colleagues and I shouted some questions, mostly about Clinton’s recent meeting with Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren.

Perhaps eager to avoid answering or maybe just taken aback by our volume, Clinton responded with an exaggerated motion, shaking her head vigorously for a few seconds. Video of the moment shows me holding out my recorder in front of her, laughing and stepping back in surprise. After the exchange, she took a few more photos, exited the shop and greeted supporters waiting outside.

Two months later, that innocuous exchange has become the fodder for one of some Trump supporters’ most popular conspiracy theories: her failing health. Where I saw evasiveness, they see seizures.

Stringing the footage together with shots of Clinton seeming to get help going up stairs, they pressed the case that Clinton has health issues serious enough to disqualify her from the presidency. The hashtag? #HillaryHealth.

“Wow! Did Hillary Clinton Just Suffer a Seizure on Camera?” asked Jim Hoft at Gateway Pundit on July 23, more than a month after that day at the muffin shop.

Much of such speculation about the state of Clinton’s health stems from a concussion she sustained in December 2012 after fainting, an episode her doctor has attributed to a stomach virus and dehydration. During the course of her treatment, she was found to have a blood clot in a vein in the space between the brain and the skull behind the right ear.

To recover, Clinton spent a few days in New York-Presbyterian Hospital and took a month-long absence from the State Department for treatment.

Republican strategist Karl Rove later called it a “serious health episode” that would be an issue if Clinton ran for president, fueling a theory the concussion posed a graver threat to her abilities than Clinton and her team let on.

A July 2015 letter released by Clinton’s campaign proclaimed her in “excellent physical condition and fit to serve as president of the United States,” according to Dr. Lisa Bardack, an internist and chairman of the Department of Medicine at the Mount Kisco Medical Group in New York.

Bardack also said testing in 2013 showed “complete resolution” of the concussion’s effects, including double vision, which Clinton wore glasses with special lenses to address — further fueling rumors.

Such medical records are routinely released by presidential candidates. Trump’s, released in December, proclaimed him to be in “extraordinary” health.

Clinton’s campaign didn’t comment on the latest round of speculation.

That hasn’t stopped plenty of people online. After the video appeared on cable news, my Twitter feed exploded. One commenter compared me to actress Shelley Duvall from the horror movie “The Shining.”

The conservative Fox News host Sean Hannity opened a 6-minute Thursday night segment titled “Hillary’s Health” by saying, “as speculation swirls about Hillary Clinton’s health,” citing a headline from the right-wing news site Drudge Report.

Hannity repeatedly played the muffin shop footage, describing what Clinton was doing as “this sort of twitching thing that she does in front of reporters that was really bad” and then as “a violent, violent, repetitive jerking of the head.”

Seemingly as “proof” that something was amiss with Clinton, Hannity exclaimed: “Watch the reporter, like, pull back as she — the reporter got scared. And she keeps doing it. What is that?”

Fox News never contacted me to ask that question. For the record, I wasn’t scared for a moment.

———

Follow Lisa Lerer on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/llerer

WASHINGTON (AP) — I’ve never been part of a conspiracy theory. Now, video of my surprised facial expression has become Exhibit A in the latest unfounded speculation about Hillary Clinton.

It starts with Clinton’s visit to a muffin shop in Washington on June 10, five days before the District of Columbia’s Democratic primary. The then-presumptive Democratic nominee popped in for a photo op with Mayor Muriel Bowser and other officials supporting her campaign.

As an Associated Press reporter who’s spent more than a year covering her candidacy, I was there for her appearance. After she ordered herself a “cold chai,” my colleagues and I shouted some questions, mostly about Clinton’s recent meeting with Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren.

Perhaps eager to avoid answering or maybe just taken aback by our volume, Clinton responded with an exaggerated motion, shaking her head vigorously for a few seconds. Video of the moment shows me holding out my recorder in front of her, laughing and stepping back in surprise. After the exchange, she took a few more photos, exited the shop and greeted supporters waiting outside.

Two months later, that innocuous exchange has become the fodder for one of some Trump supporters’ most popular conspiracy theories: her failing health. Where I saw evasiveness, they see seizures.

Stringing the footage together with shots of Clinton seeming to get help going up stairs, they pressed the case that Clinton has health issues serious enough to disqualify her from the presidency. The hashtag? #HillaryHealth.

“Wow! Did Hillary Clinton Just Suffer a Seizure on Camera?” asked Jim Hoft at Gateway Pundit on July 23, more than a month after that day at the muffin shop.

Much of such speculation about the state of Clinton’s health stems from a concussion she sustained in December 2012 after fainting, an episode her doctor has attributed to a stomach virus and dehydration. During the course of her treatment, she was found to have a blood clot in a vein in the space between the brain and the skull behind the right ear.

To recover, Clinton spent a few days in New York-Presbyterian Hospital and took a month-long absence from the State Department for treatment.

Republican strategist Karl Rove later called it a “serious health episode” that would be an issue if Clinton ran for president, fueling a theory the concussion posed a graver threat to her abilities than Clinton and her team let on.

A July 2015 letter released by Clinton’s campaign proclaimed her in “excellent physical condition and fit to serve as president of the United States,” according to Dr. Lisa Bardack, an internist and chairman of the Department of Medicine at the Mount Kisco Medical Group in New York.

Bardack also said testing in 2013 showed “complete resolution” of the concussion’s effects, including double vision, which Clinton wore glasses with special lenses to address — further fueling rumors.

Such medical records are routinely released by presidential candidates. Trump’s, released in December, proclaimed him to be in “extraordinary” health.

Clinton’s campaign didn’t comment on the latest round of speculation.

That hasn’t stopped plenty of people online. After the video appeared on cable news, my Twitter feed exploded. One commenter compared me to actress Shelley Duvall from the horror movie “The Shining.”

The conservative Fox News host Sean Hannity opened a 6-minute Thursday night segment titled “Hillary’s Health” by saying, “as speculation swirls about Hillary Clinton’s health,” citing a headline from the right-wing news site Drudge Report.

Hannity repeatedly played the muffin shop footage, describing what Clinton was doing as “this sort of twitching thing that she does in front of reporters that was really bad” and then as “a violent, violent, repetitive jerking of the head.”

Seemingly as “proof” that something was amiss with Clinton, Hannity exclaimed: “Watch the reporter, like, pull back as she — the reporter got scared. And she keeps doing it. What is that?”

Fox News never contacted me to ask that question. For the record, I wasn’t scared for a moment.

———

Follow Lisa Lerer on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/llerer

Yasiel Puig has found the party in the Pacific Coast League.

Days after a demotion to the minors, the unpredictable Los Angeles Dodgers outfielder posted videos to his Snapchat account Monday night of him partying with his new Triple-A teammates. The series of videos came after Oklahoma City’s 3-2 loss at the Iowa Cubs.

Puig began by posting a video of him shirtless in the team’s locker room, smiling and saying: “It’s so funny. We lose today, and everybody’s happy.”

Videos posted later showed Puig and his teammates dancing, singing and chanting, often using profanity.

A banner on one of the videos reads, “I Love this Team.”

“We are aware of what Yasiel posted on social media last night and while we are disappointed in his and some of our other players’ judgment, this is a matter we will address internally,” Andrew Friedman, Dodgers president of baseball operations, said in a statement released by the team Tuesday.

Dodgers manager Dave Roberts he was “a little surprised” when he saw the videos on Tuesday.

“Every organization handles these things in their own manner and we will take care of this,” Roberts said. “It’s going to be a bit. Yasiel’s goal is to focus on becoming a better ballplayer. I want to focus on the guys that are here.”

Puig was optioned to Oklahoma City last week after the Dodgers could not find a taker for him before the non-waiver trade deadline. He went 2 for 4 in his first game with Oklahoma City on Sunday and was 0 for 3 on Monday.

A major league All-Star in 2014, the 25-year-old Puig has been physically limited this season and largely inconsistent when healthy, batting .260 with seven homers in 81 big league games.

The Cuban slugger signed a $42 million, seven-year contract in June 2012.

RAMALLAH, West Bank (AP) — The Gaza Strip is a prosperous territory with lush lawns and gleaming high-rises — at least that’s the image in a sleek campaign video made by activists of the territory’s ruling Islamic militant Hamas group.

The online clip entitled “Thank you, Hamas” makes no mention of closed borders and other fallout from conflicts with Gaza’s neighbors since Hamas seized the strip in 2007.

Social media pushback was swift.

Hamas rival Fatah responded with a video showing Gaza hardships such as frequent power outages.

Hamas spokesman Salah Bardaweel said Tuesday the group “is not telling people that we live in paradise,” but argues that it has governed well under tough circumstances.

October municipal Palestinian elections will mark the first time in a decade Hamas and Fatah compete at the ballot box.