NEW YORK (AP) — The Latest on President-elect Donald Trump (all times EST):

9:30 p.m.

President-elect Donald Trump is appearing to deny that he is using the powers of his future office to benefit his businesses worldwide.

Trump took to Twitter Monday night to say it was “well-known” that he has properties across the globe. He blamed the media for raising questions about them.

He has said repeatedly that he will leave his company to his children and have no interest in it — but three of his adult children are also playing key roles in his transition.

Trump also tweeted that he believes Nigel Farage, leader of the “Leave” movement that propelled the United Kingdom to quit the European Union, would do “a great job” as Great Britain’s ambassador to the United States.

Farage supported Trump’s campaign and visited the president-elect this week.

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6:20 p.m.

President-elect Donald Trump is telling the American people that he is assembling a Cabinet made up of “patriots.”

Trump says in a video released late Monday that his agenda “will be based on a simple core principle: putting America first.”

He is reiterating a number of his promises for the first 100 days of his administration, including vows to negotiate new trade deals, remove regulations on businesses and establish a five-year ban on executive officials becoming lobbyists.

Notably missing from his promises is his pledge to repeal the Affordable Care Act and his vow to build a southern border wall with Mexico.

Trump has yet to hold the traditional news conference that previous presidents-elect have done within days of winning on Election Day.

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4:30 p.m.

President-elect Donald Trump is considering Dallas investor Ray Washburne as secretary of the interior.

That’s according to a person familiar with the deliberations who spoke on condition of anonymity because the person was not authorized to discuss the decision-making publicly.

Washburne, who worked on New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie’s presidential campaign before backing Trump, is a major GOP fundraiser.

He had previously been floated for commerce secretary.

Other candidates mentioned as potential candidates for the interior position include former Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer.

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2:30 p.m.

A congressional Democrat on the House Armed Services Committee says she had a “frank and positive” conversation with President-elect Donald Trump about Syria.

Rep. Tulsi Gabbard of Hawaii says in a statement Monday that she shared with Trump her opposition to creating a no-fly zone over Syria.

Gabbard says that would “lead to more death and suffering,” worsen the refugee crisis and strengthen the Islamic State group, as well as al-Qaeda. Gabbard says it could also bring the U.S. into direct conflict with Russia, “which could result in a nuclear war.”

Gabbard is also an Army National Guard major. She resigned her post in the Democratic National Committee earlier this year after endorsing Bernie Sanders over Hillary Clinton.

Trump’s aides say the president-elect wants to hear viewpoints from across the political spectrum.

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12:05 p.m.

Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin says she “discussed a wide range of issues” with President-elect Donald Trump but that she has not yet been offered a post in his administration.

Fallin, a Republican, is being considered to head the Interior Department, according to Trump aide Kellyanne Conway. Fallin met with Trump at Trump Tower on Monday and said they had a “wonderful discussion.”

Her meeting with Trump came after he sat down with former U.S. Sen. Scott Brown of Massachusetts. Brown indicated he is under consideration to become Veterans Affairs secretary.

Brown, a Republican and member of the Army National Guard, told reporters he believes he is “the best person” for the job. He said his priorities would be to combat veterans’ mental health issues in hopes of preventing suicides.

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11:10 a.m.

President-elect Donald Trump will spend Thanksgiving at his Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida. Vice President-elect Mike Pence is travelling to Mississippi, where his son is stationed, for the holiday.

That’s according to Jason Miller, a spokesman for Trump’s transition team.

Pence’s son, Michael, is a Marine who is training to be a pilot.

Miller said Trump will get together with family at his Palm Beach home and take a brief break from transition planning. Asked what Trump will be doing, Miller said, “hopefully eating some turkey.”

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8:30 a.m.

President-elect Donald Trump is planning to meet on Monday with Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin and former Texas governor and GOP presidential rival Rick Perry.

That’s according to top aide Kellyanne Conway. She told Fox News on Monday that Perry is a possible contender to lead the Defense or Energy departments and that Fallin is being considered to head the Interior Department.

In a separate interview on CNN, Conway said Tennessee Sen. Bob Corker is “rumored” to be on the list for secretary of state. Mitt Romney, a former Trump critic, has been discussed as a contender for that job as well.

Conway warned against drawing any conclusions from Trump’s meetings. She said: “Not everyone who consults with the president-elect or meets with him is going to be in his Cabinet.”

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7:50 a.m.

If Donald Trump is waiting for an apology from the cast of “Hamilton,” he will continue to wait.

Actor Brandon Victor Dixon, who plays Aaron Burr in the celebrated musical, told “CBS This Morning” that “there’s nothing to apologize for.” Dixon gave Vice President-elect Mike Pence an onstage earful about equality at the end of Friday’s performance.

Trump has taken to Twitter to demand an apology.

Dixon said “Hamilton” creator Lin-Manuel Miranda had a hand in crafting Dixon’s remarks, although Dixon said he “made some adjustments.”

Dixon said Monday that both Trump and Pence are welcome to come back stage and meet with the cast at any time, adding, “Art is meant to bring people together.”

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7:45 a.m.

Kellyanne Conway, a top aide to Donald Trump, says the president-elect will continue to use his Twitter account to “cut through the nonsense” and draw attention to his plan for the country.

Trump tweeted nine times this weekend, twice about his transition plans. The other tweets complained about a skit on “Saturday Night Live,” the cast of the Broadway hit “Hamilton,” Sen. Harry Reid and his fraud case with Trump University.

When CNN’s Chris Cuomo noted that most of his tweets didn’t draw attention to his plan for the country, Conway asked: “Why do you care?”

She said Trump isn’t focused on division: “This network and other people will always be focused on divisions. How about accepting the election results, Chris, and letting him form a government?”

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7:30 a.m.

President-elect Donald Trump is casting himself as the dealmaker-elect following a weekend of meetings.

With people coming and going at a New Jersey golf club, Trump says he’s made “a couple of deals” as he and his transition team consider Cabinet posts and other administration positions.

Two names emerging from those sessions are Mitt Romney as a potential secretary of state and retired Marine Gen. James Mattis as a prospect for defense secretary.

TEMPE, Ariz. (AP) — With his team in the midst of a highly disappointing season, Arizona Cardinals coach Bruce Arians was in the hospital Monday after feeling ill overnight, the team said.

The Cardinals issued a statement saying the 64-year-old coach was not feeling well Sunday night after returning home from Arizona’s game in Minnesota and his wife took him to the hospital.

The Cardinals said via Twitter on Monday night that Arians has been released from the hospital.

Wide receiver Larry Fitzgerald said he spoke to Arians when the coach still was in the hospital.

“(He) says he is resting comfortably, and that he’s feeling better,” Fitzgerald said. “… He didn’t go into specific details when I talked to him. From what I heard, he just wasn’t feeling well, and being precautionary, he wanted to make sure he was OK.”

Fitzgerald, speaking to reporters in a news conference that was held in place of Arians’ usual Monday session, said the players bear some responsibility for Arians’ health issues.

“It is stressful when we’re playing bad,” Fitzgerald said. “We were 13-3 last year and he was feeling good, so as a player, you feel probably responsible for what’s happening and the stress on him not feeling well. I think a lot of that falls on our shoulders, and we don’t feel good about it.”

Arizona lost 30-24 to the Minnesota Vikings in Minneapolis on Sunday. With almost everyone returning from last season’s 13-3 team, the Cardinals were expected to be Super Bowl contenders but are 4-5-1 through 10 games.

Arians, often highly animated on the sidelines, is one of the NFL’s more colorful personalities. His profanity-laced dialogue was a highlight of the “All or Nothing” video series by NFL Films chronicling the Cardinals’ 2015 season.

He was also hospitalized overnight during the preseason after doubling over with stomach pains as his team was practicing with the Chargers in San Diego. After he left the hospital, Arians said the pain was caused by diverticulitis. He said he would further adjust his diet, something he said he already had begun to do.

“He’s not the only 60-plus-year-old man in our country dealing with health issues,” Fitzgerald said. “I think that is pretty common for someone his age, but obviously he is in a stressful situation being head coach. But coach takes care of himself. He works out every single day in the training room. He eats right.”

Assistant head coach Tom Moore took Arians’ place in Monday’s meetings.

Fitzgerald, in his 13th NFL season and one of the team captains, said Arians’ hospitalization put the game of football in perspective.

“I think it really punctuates how fragile life can be,” he said. “At times when you are in the midst of a season and things are not going the way you want them to go, you lose sight of that. You feel like the world is closing in on you. You go out to eat at restaurants and people are telling you how bad you’re playing, so you kind of lose sight of real-world perspective. I think something like this snaps you back to reality.”

An assistant coach for decades, Arians became interim head coach at Indianapolis in 2012 when Chuck Pagano left for treatment of leukemia. The team went 9-3 under Arians and he was named NFL coach of the year.

He took the head coaching job with Arizona the following season, guiding the team to a 10-6 record and won a second coach of the year honor after guiding Arizona to an 11-5 mark in 2014.

Overall, the Cardinals are 38-18-1 under Arians.

Arizona plays at Atlanta next Sunday, and there was no word on whether the coach would be there.

“I don’t think any of us have the right to tell him to stay away,” Fitzgerald said. “We’re wired to be able to participate and do our job, and I know coach, he is the most fiery of the whole group.”

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For more NFL coverage: http://www.pro32.ap.org and http://www.twitter.com/AP—NFL

Leaving on a jet plane? Traveling somewhere new and different is always exciting. But the struggle of lugging your suitcase around is real. That’s all about to become a thing of the airport past though. It’s true. No more running through big, bustling airports to catch your connection. No more pre-flight sweating. And no more frustrating suitcases flopping over, because the world’s first motorized, ridable luggage is coming to market.

Modobag is one of the most innovative and exciting advancements to hit the travel industry since rolling suitcases were introduced in the 1970s…From the first-time traveler to the veteran flight attendant, there is widespread agreement that Modobag will help make travel more functional and fun,” says its founder, Kevin O’Donnell on their website.

When you’re inside, you can go up to five miles per hour and eight miles per hour outdoors. That may not sound like a lot of speed, but it’s three times faster than walking. How do you stop the Modobag? Don’t worry. It’s got steering and brakes. And as the company points out, you can always do a Fred Flintstone and put your feet down.

Modobag is powered by a 150 watt brushed electric motor, its lithium batteries are air compliant with the air travel regulations, and when fully charged, you can go up to six miles. It’s also compatible with two USB devices so you don’t have to wrestle for one of the few airport charging stations!

Modobag is sturdy too, with a high strength ballistic nylon shell and CAD-designed, lightweight aluminum frame.  So how would you like to climb aboard and race through the airport on your next trip?

Vote and tell us what you think — you can even submit video comments to nbt@channelone.com. We will feature the results of the poll and some of your comments on the show!

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — South Korean prosecutors on Sunday said they believe President Park Geun-hye conspired in criminal activities of a secretive confidante who allegedly manipulated government affairs and exploited her presidential ties to amass an illicit fortune — a damning revelation that may convince opposition parties to push for her impeachment.

Prosecutors are planning to soon question Park, who has immunity but can be investigated, said Lee Young-ryeol, chief prosecutor of the Seoul Central District Prosecutors’ Office.

Prosecutors on Sunday formally charged Park’s longtime friend, Choi Soon-sil, on suspicion of interfering with state affairs and bullying companies into giving tens of millions of dollars to foundations and businesses she controlled.

In a televised news conference, Lee said that based on the evidence, “the president was involved as a conspirator in a considerable part of the criminal activities by suspects Choi Soon-sil, Ahn Jong-beom and Jung Ho-sung.” He was referring to two presidential aides who also were formally charged Sunday for allegedly helping Choi.

“However, because of the president’s impunity from prosecution stated in Article 84 of the constitution, we cannot indict the president. The special investigation headquarters will continue to push for an investigation of the president based on this judgment,” Lee said.

Park’s office had no immediate comment Sunday.

Park is facing growing calls to resign over the scandal critics say has undermined the country’s democracy. Although emboldened by a wave of mass protests, opposition parties have so far refrained from seriously pushing for Park’s impeachment over fears of triggering a backlash from conservative voters and negatively impacting next year’s presidential election.

However, there are growing voices within the opposition saying that an impeachment attempt is inevitable because it’s unlikely Park will resign and give up her immunity.

Ahn Jong-beom, Park’s former senior secretary for policy coordination, was charged with abuse of authority, coercion and attempted coercion over allegations that he pressured companies into making large donations to foundations and companies Choi controlled.

Jung Ho-sung, the other former aide who was indicted, was accused of passing on classified presidential documents to Choi, including information on ministerial candidates.

According to Lee, Choi and Ahn conspired to pressure companies into giving a combined 77.4 billion won ($65.5 million) to the Mir and K-Sports foundations, two nonprofits that were under Choi’s control. The companies couldn’t refuse because they feared doing so would result in business disadvantages, such as difficulties in gaining government approval for projects or being targeted in tax investigations, Lee said.

Additionally, Choi and Ahn pressured the Lotte Group into giving 7 billion won ($5.9 million) to the K Sports foundation to finance the construction of a sports facility in the city of Hanam, which was to be operated by The Blue K, a company established by Choi, Lee said.

Auto giant Hyundai and telecommunications company KT were forced to contract 13 billion won ($11 million) worth of their advertisements to Playground, an ad agency virtually run by Choi, Lee said. Hyundai was also forced to buy 1.1 billion won ($931,000) worth of supplies from an auto parts maker run by Choi’s friend. Ahn and Choi also tried but failed to take over the shares of an advertisement company previously owned by steelmaker POSCO, Lee said.

Prosecutors are also seeking to indict Cha Eun-taek, a famous music video director who allegedly used his close relationship with Choi to win lucrative government culture projects, and former vice sports minister Kim Chong, suspected of providing business favors to sports organizations controlled by Choi.

Kim is also under suspicion of influencing the ministry’s decision to financially support a sports foundation run by Choi’s niece, who prosecutors detained on Friday.

On Saturday, police said about 170,000 people turned out for the latest anti-Park protest in streets near City Hall and a boulevard fronting an old palace gate in Seoul.

Demonstrators also marched in streets near the presidential offices, carrying candles and illuminating cellphones, and shouting “Park Geun-hye step down” and “Arrest Park Geun-hye.”

Park’s term lasts until Feb. 24, 2018. If she steps down before the presidential vote on Dec. 20, 2017, an election must be held within 60 days.

ATHENS, Greece (AP) — Greek police say that a lawmaker with the extreme right Golden Dawn party has been briefly hospitalized after being set upon by a group of people, possibly anarchists, who hit him with an iron bar and sprayed him with pepper spray.

Police say that Giorgos Germenis was sitting at a cafe in a northern Athens suburb when he was attacked on Saturday. He was given first aid at a nearby pharmacy and then went to a hospital to be examined.

Germenis has released a video where he claims he resisted about 30 individuals and caused them to flee. In the video, his face appears slightly bruised, with no major injuries.

Before he was elected, in 2012, Germenis was known as a bassist in a Greek-Norwegian black metal band.

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. (AP) — Joe McDufee has seen just about everything since he started attending Indiana Hoosiers games in 1949.

He’s celebrated five national championships and an undefeated season, coped with the firing of Bob Knight, witnessed the rise and fall of the program under Mike Davis and Kelvin Sampson, cheered for the resurgence of the Hoosiers under Tom Crean and will never forget the indelible image of that chair being flung across the floor.

Yet when McDufee entered the newly renovated Assembly Hall for the first time in October, the 84-year-old Indianapolis resident was stunned.

“It’s the same old place but it’s gotten a shine to it, doesn’t it?” he marveled. “Really, really beautiful. The entryway out here just blows your mind.”

There may be no state in America that reveres basketball history more than Indiana. McDufee, like so many others around the Hoosier State, knew the 35-year-old arena needed a makeover long before an 8-foot metal plate broke away from the ceiling and fell into the seats just hours before Indiana and Iowa were scheduled to play in February 2014.

What pragmatists noticed was that other schools were ditching their quaint, dark, sometimes historic arenas for bright, brand new palaces. They added more practice space, upgraded weight rooms and installed new amenities with hopes of attracting prized recruits and top dollars from donors who would embrace the improved fan experience.

Assembly Hall, meanwhile, was widely viewed as a link to an Indiana history that should not be defaced or disturbed.

Athletic director Fred Glass knew better.

So when Cindy Simon Skjodt, an Indiana alum and the daughter of Mel Simon, the late Indiana Pacers co-owner, offered $40 million gift to give the arena a new look, Glass took it and began the quest of turning the hall into a basketball mecca for a whole new generation of Indiana fans.

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Every Indiana community has a basketball story.

The Big Ten’s career scoring leader, Calbert Cheaney, played high school basketball in Evansville. Purdue’s career scoring leader, Rick Mount, played prep ball in Lebanon, about 45 minutes southeast of campus. Before chasing college and pro championships, Oscar Robertson fought for playing time on a hard-clay court in Indianapolis known as the Lockefield Dustbowl. Larry Bird, of course, will always be known as the “Hick from French Lick.”

Bill Garrett went from Shelbyville High School to Indiana, becoming the Big Ten’s first African-American to log regular minutes. Bobby Plump was the real-life star of the Milan Miracle, Damon Bailey of Bedford remains the boys’ high school career scoring leader and former Looggottee High School coach Jack Butcher won a state-record 806 games.

Indiana has several unique venues. Athletic administrators often tap dance around history while trying to keep up with the Joneses.

Butler athletic director Barry Collier faced that dilemma when he realized Hinkle Fieldhouse needed refurbishing. The former Bulldogs player and coach presided over a $36 million face lift on one of the oldest courts still used in Division I basketball. Hinkle hosted Indiana state basketball championship games from its opening in 1928 through 1971, served as a military barracks during World War II and was a movie set for “Hoosiers.”

The project replaced wooden railings with Plexiglas, bench seats with seat backs, new scoreboards and a video board above midcourt that allowed fans to see replays. Administrators tried to leave the character of the building untouched.

“I don’t think it’s lost anything at all,” said 30-year-old Tyler Moore, who attended Collier’s basketball camp at Butler. “We talked about how much cleaner things like the bathrooms are now, and to be in the Big East and recruit the caliber of player you want, you need have a place like this.”

Former Purdue athletic director Morgan Burke faced the same task in 2007 when blueprints were drawn for the first major project at Mackey Arena in 40 years.

When it opened in December 1967, Purdue hosted one of its most famous alums, John Wooden, and his powerhouse UCLA team. Mount made his college debut that day against reigning national player of the year Lew Alcindor. During the next several decades, the Boilermakers embraced coaches such as Gene Keady and Matt Painter, watched future No. 1 draft picks Joe Barry Carroll and Glenn Robinson and celebrated a three-year Big Ten title run.

Burke found a way to add more comfortable seats, a more appealing ticket office and better practice facilities. Since completing the $82 million project five years ago, attendance has increased and Purdue has reclaimed its perch in the Big Ten’s upper division.

“As far as the recruits, it’s all about the show,” said Trent Johnson, who graduated from Purdue in 1988 and has had season tickets for 20 years. “When they play AAU ball, they already are traveling to Las Vegas, Orlando and Atlanta. They want a certain wow factor. They are pampered. If you don’t do it, you risk losing kids to other schools who have upgraded facilities. You need the players to continue to draw the crowds.”

Not everyone agrees.

A half century ago, six Indianapolis men pooled their money together to found the ABA’s Indiana Pacers. Their first home court was Indiana State Fairgrounds Coliseum, where fans were so close to the floor that former Pacers star player Darnell Hillman said he could hear their heartbeats.

Over the years, the Pacers moved to Market Square Arena and eventually to Bankers Life Fieldhouse, a spacious NBA facility full of suites and restaurants. Hillman waxes nostalgic when he thinks about the renovated coliseum, which reopened in 2014-15 as the new home court for IUPUI.

“I think we have to find a way to hold on to that,” Hillman said. “That’s where the history of basketball lives. This is basketball country. They love the game. They’re into it from the moment they get to the arena.””

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At Indiana, the three-story entryway looks more like the entrance to a mansion than a basketball arena with its shiny escalators and elevators and all those open windows. There’s a presidential suite behind the student section, trophy cases on both sides of the lobby, even touch screen technology to learn more about Hoosiers’ history in all sports.

On the north end, the feature attraction is the hanging midcourt section from the playing floor used at Assembly Hall from 1976-95. Look around and fans will find the scoreboard that hung above center court from 1983-2005 and the double-sided stanchions that were once a signature part of Indiana basketball.

Inside, all the seats are crimson-and-cream and a new large videoboard can be seen from every corner of the court.

“I think it’s fantastic,” said Dan Caldwell, a 37-year-old Bloomington resident. “I love the mix of the new and the old and I think they’ve kept that home-court advantage just with the way the crowd is right on top of the floor and everything. And they’ve kind of brought it into the next century so to speak, so yeah, I love it.”

McDufee believes Indiana made the right call by making renovations to the building he calls home rather than tearing it down and starting over.

“If they could have built one that seated about 24,000 or 25,000 so all the people that could wanted to be in could be in, that would have been good,” he said. “But I don’t know, there’s a lot, a lot of history here and tradition and I love the place.”