STORRS, Conn. (AP) — University of Connecticut students are calling on school officials to put a stop to hate speech on campus, in response to an altercation featuring a conservative commentator earlier this week.

Students said Friday at a rally that the university should not condone speeches like the one titled, “It’s OK To Be White.” The speech was given on campus Tuesday by Lucian Wintrich, the White House correspondent for the right-wing blog Gateway Pundit.

A young woman appeared to take paperwork off the lectern during Wintrich’s speech. Cellphone video showed Wintrich running up and grabbing her. Police charged Wintrich with breach of peace.

Wintrich says he had every right to retrieve his property.

University spokeswoman Stephanie Reitz said in a statement that school officials welcome discussions with students about free speech issues.

BUDAPEST, Hungary (AP) — Hungarian-American financier and philanthropist George Soros says oppression of the opposition by Prime Minister Viktor Orban’s government is greater than when Hungary was under Soviet domination.

Soros said in video messages released Friday that if Orban expels the Soros-founded Central European University, he will keep it in exile and return after Orban’s departure.

Orban, who opposes migration, especially by Muslims, claims Soros wants to flood Europe with migrants. Soros supports migration but says no country should be forced to take them in.

Orban, who briefly studied at Oxford on a Soros scholarship in the late 1980s, said on state radio that non-governmental organizations funded by Soros are preparing to act as political parties during the campaign before April’s parliamentary election to help weaken or oust his anti-migration government.

“Big Bang Theory” star Kaley Cuoco has gotten engaged to boyfriend Karl Cook.

Cook posted a video on his Instagram account Thursday of a tearful Cuoco flashing a diamond ring on her finger and shouting “we’re engaged” before officially accepting Cook’s proposal with a loud “yes.” Thursday also happened to be Cuoco’s 32nd birthday.

The 26-year-old Cook said in the caption of the video that the engagement comes after nearly two years of dating. He added: “This is the best night of my life and I think the video shows it is the best night for kaley as well.”

Cook is a professional equestrian and the son of Intuit co-founder Scott Cook. Cuoco has starred as Penny on “The Big Bang Theory” since the sitcom’s debut in 2007.

BEIJING (AP) — The Chinese company that is the world’s biggest maker of commercial drones is denying claims in a U.S. government document circulated online that it gives Beijing information about American law enforcement and utility companies.

DJI Ltd. denied suggestions in the document, posted on technology news websites, that it shared information about U.S. utility companies and other “critical infrastructure” with the Chinese government. A company statement said it doesn’t look at flight logs, photos or video “unless customers actively upload and share them with us.”

The dispute highlights growing concern among governments about potential risks associated with the flood of data generated by smartphones, social media and other technology. China has ordered companies to store data about its citizens within this country, which prompted Apple Inc. to announce plans in July to set up a data center in southern China.

The U.S. document, citing an unidentified source in the unmanned aerial systems industry, says data from DJI drones are transmitted to computers in China to which the government might have access. The document says it was issued by the intelligence program of the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement office in Los Angeles.

The American Embassy in Beijing said it had passed to ICE questions about whether the document was genuine.

The agency has “moderate confidence” that DJI “is providing U.S. critical infrastructure and law enforcement data to the Chinese government,” the document says. “A foreign government with access to this information could easily coordinate physical or cyber-attacks against critical sites.”

DJI, or Da Jiang Innovations Science and Technology Co., Ltd., was founded in 2007 by an engineer named Frank Wang and dominates the global market for remote-controlled drones used by photographers. It increasingly markets them for use in surveying or to monitor farms and industrial sites.

The DJI statement said the U.S. report was based on “clearly false and misleading claims.”

“DJI does not send data on DJI cloud servers to the Chinese government. Nor does it allow access to such data by the Chinese government,” said a company spokesman, Kevin On, in an email. “DJI is not aware of an instance in which the Chinese government has accessed user or drone data for operators determined to be in the United States.”

On said DJI has added features to give commercial or government users the option not to upload data to its servers or connect to the internet.

The DJI statement said the company submitted a rebuttal of the report to the ICE. It urged the agency to consider whether its source “may have had a competitive or improper motive” to hurt DJI by making false claims.

The U.S. military suspended use of DJI drones in August due to concern their data might not be secure. Australia’s military followed suit in September.

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DJI Ltd.: www.dji.com

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — Two days after North Korea test-launched its most powerful missile to date, a clearer picture is emerging of Pyongyang’s impressive technological achievement — and what still remains before it can legitimately threaten the continental United States.

Many questions remain, but there’s broad agreement from government and outside analyses that the huge Hwasong-15 intercontinental ballistic missile represents a significant step forward, putting the North very close to its goal of a viable arsenal of nuclear-tipped long-range missiles — maybe as early as the middle of next year.

The two-stage liquid-fuel missile fired Wednesday is potentially capable of striking targets as far as 13,000 kilometers (8,100 miles), which would put Washington within reach, South Korea’s Defense Ministry said Friday in a report to lawmakers. It’s also considerably larger than North Korea’s previous ICBM, the Hwasong-14, and designed to deliver larger warheads, the ministry said. That would seem to confirm the North’s boast after the launch that the Hwasong-15 can carry “super-large heavy nuclear warheads.”

Michael Elleman, an analyst at the International Institute for Strategic Studies, said it appears that the Hwasong-15 can deliver a 1,000-kilogram (2,200 pound) payload to any point on the U.S. mainland. North Korea, which has so far conducted six nuclear tests, has almost certainly developed a nuclear warhead that weighs less than 700 kilograms (1,543 pounds) , if not one considerably lighter, Elleman wrote Friday on the 38 North website .

North Korea said the missile on Wednesday reached an apogee of 4,475 kilometers (2,780 miles) and flew 950 kilometers (600 miles), splashing down close to Japan after being launched from a site near Pyongyang on a high trajectory to avoid other countries; that flight data was similar to what was announced by South Korea’s military.

It’s still not clear how close the missile is to being combat ready. The Defense Ministry told lawmakers that further review is needed to determine whether the missile’s warhead can survive atmospheric re-entry, accurately hit a target and detonate properly.

South Korean President Moon Jae-in shared his country’s assessment with President Donald Trump in a telephone conversation Thursday night. The leaders reaffirmed their commitment to strengthen pressure and sanctions on Pyongyang to discourage its nuclear ambitions, Seoul’s presidential office said Friday. Eugene Lee, spokeswoman of South Korea’s Unification Ministry, which deals with affairs related to North Korea, said the Seoul government thinks the North hasn’t crossed the “red line” in weapons development yet because it hasn’t perfected its ICBMs.

North Korea has described its new ICBM as “significantly more” powerful than the Hwasong-14, which the North flight tested twice in July. Photos and video of the launch released by the North’s state media on Thursday confirm the Hwasong-15 is an entirely different beast.

After initially assessing the missile as a modified version of the Hwasong-14 following Wednesday’s launch, South Korea’s military now says the Hwasong-15 is considerably larger and potentially capable of carrying bigger payloads.

The Hwasong-15 is longer than the Hwasong-14 by 2 meters (6.56 feet) and also thicker, particularly its second stage, which is 80 centimeters (2.62 feet) wider than Hwasong-14’s second stage, Seoul’s Defense Ministry said.

Hwasong-15’s 9-axle transport vehicle, which the North also revealed for the first time, was also 2 meters (6.56 feet) longer than the 8-axle truck the North used to carry the Hwasong-14s.

The Hwasong-15’s first stage is powered by a pair of engines that were also used in the single-engine first stages of the Hwasong-14, the ministry said. It was still working to analyze the construction of the second stage.

It’s possible that the missile has been designed to carry simple decoys, or other countermeasures, to confuse the U.S. missile defense system, Elleman wrote.

He added that “if low confidence in the missile’s reliability is acceptable, two or three test firings over the next four to six months may be all that is required before Kim Jong Un declares the Hwasong-15 combat ready.”

STORRS, Conn. (AP) — A community college adviser has been identified by her lawyer as the woman involved in an altercation with a conservative commentator during his speech at the University of Connecticut titled “It’s OK To Be White.”

The Hartford Courant reports attorney Jon Schoenhorn says Catherine Gregory hired him after commentator Lucian Wintrich said publicly he’d press charges against her.

Gregory works at Quinebaug Valley Community College in Connecticut.

Wintrich’s speech was cut short Tuesday when a young woman appeared to take paperwork off his lectern and began leaving.

Cellphone videos show Wintrich running up and grabbing her.

Wintrich was charged with breach of peace.

The community college confirmed an employee attended the event, but didn’t name Gregory.

Schoenhorn said Gregory wouldn’t comment.

Gregory didn’t respond to messages from The Associated Press.