CHICAGO (AP) — United Airlines is changing a company policy and will no longer allow crew members to displace customers already onboard an airplane.

The change comes after a passenger, Dr. David Dao, was dragged from a fully-booked United Express flight in Chicago because he refused to give up his seat to make room for crew members. Cellphone video of the incident sparked widespread outrage and created a public-relations nightmare for United.

Under the change outlined in an internal April 14 email, a crew member must make must-ride bookings at least 60 minutes prior to departure. Crews could previously be booked until the time of departure.

United spokeswoman Maggie Schmerin said in an email Sunday that the change is an initial step in a review of policies and it’s meant to ensure that situations like Dao’s never happen again.

HARPURSVILLE, N.Y. (AP) — April the giraffe’s calf is nursing strongly and his mother is recovering “perfectly,” said officials with Animal Adventure Park on Sunday after a morning veterinarian check with the newborn.

April gave birth to a healthy male calf Saturday at the privately owned Animal Adventure Park before an online audience of more than a million viewers.

The 15-year-old giraffe delivered her calf shortly before 10 a.m. EDT in an enclosed pen at the zoo in Harpursville, a rural upstate village about 130 miles (209 kilometers) northwest of New York City.

The calf weighs in at 129 pounds (58.5 kilograms) and stands 5 feet 9 inches tall (1.75 meters).

“April has recovered perfectly and is eating everything in sight!” the team posted on its official Facebook page .

Seconds after birth, April tenderly licked her calf, which began to slowly pick his head up from the floor of the pen. About 45 minutes after he was born, he stood on wobbly legs while mom helped keep him steady.

At least 1.2 million people watched the Adventure Park’s YouTube streaming of the event. Zoo owner Jordan Patch said both mom and calf were doing fine.

Patch called the birth “unnerving” to watch. “Giraffes give birth standing up, which means when the calf is ready to be born, it exits its mother hooves first from six feet off the floor, making for a very exciting event,” he said in a news release.

The newborn is April’s fourth calf but Animal Adventure Park’s first giraffe calf. Giraffes are pregnant for 15 months on average. The proud papa, a 5-year-old giraffe named Oliver, watched from an adjacent pen. This is his first offspring.

The zoo began livestreaming from April’s enclosure in February. People around the world have been tuning in daily, with some growing impatient as the pregnancy seemed to drag on.

A Farmington, New Hampshire, songwriter even posted a music video on YouTube called, “I’m Going Crazy Waiting (For A Giraffe).”

April has her own website and even an apparel line. A GoFundMe fundraiser page that initially set a goal of $50,000 sat at more than $134,000 by Saturday night. The money will be used for the care of the animals.

A contest will be held to decide on a name for the calf.

Animal Adventure park is currently closed to the public and will open in mid-May.

 

Ahh…bottled water. It’s thirst-quenching and convenient. It’s there wherever we turn. After school, practice or rehearsal in the vending machines. Available for purchase at the cafe, mall or the movies. But while they each one may only cost a dollar or two, the environmental cost is actually far higher.

The truth is, billions of plastic water bottles end up in landfills and oceans every year here in the United States and around the world. And each one can take up to 1,000 years to decompose. But thankfully, sustainable-minded scientists and engineers are coming up with replacements for these plastic bottles. And one of them is Icelandic product designer Ari Jónsson, who began thinking about this problem as a college student. “We should ask ourselves, why are we using materials that take hundreds of years to break down in nature to drink from once and then throw away,” he said in a statement.

So Jónsson has developed an Algae Water Bottle that only retains its shape when filled with water. Once the water is drained from the bottle it immediately decomposes. Yes, really! The bottle is made out of red algae powder and is 100 percent biodegradable. Bonus, it stays cool naturally in warm weather!

Would you drink our of it? Vote and tell us what you think — you can even submit video comments to nbt@channelone.com. We will feature the results of the poll and some of your comments on the show!

HARPURSVILLE, N.Y. (AP) — And baby makes glee.

Before an online audience of more than a million viewers, April the giraffe gave birth to a male calf Saturday at a New York zoo, ending weeks of proverbial pacing by animal lovers in a virtual worldwide waiting room.

The 15-year-old giraffe delivered her calf shortly before 10 a.m. EDT in an enclosed pen at the zoo in Harpursville, a rural upstate village about 130 miles (209 kilometers) northwest of New York City. The mama giraffe tenderly licked her calf, which began to slowly pick its head up from the floor of the pen. About 45 minutes after it was born, the calf stood on its wobbly legs for the first time while mom helped keep her baby steady.

He began nursing not long after.

At least 1.2 million people watched the Adventure Park’s YouTube streaming of the event . A logo on the feed quickly changed from ToysRUs to BabiesRUs following the birth.

Animal Adventure Park owner Jordan Patch said that both mom and calf are doing fine.

Patch said the calf’s entrance into the world “was unnerving to even those of us who have witnessed animal births previously.”

“Giraffes give birth standing up, which means when the calf is ready to be born, it exits its mother hooves first from six feet off the floor, making for a very exciting event,” Patch said in a news release.

This is April’s fourth calf, but Animal Adventure Park’s first giraffe calf. The proud papa, a 5-year-old giraffe named Oliver, watched from an adjacent pen. This is his first offspring.

The privately owned zoo began livestreaming from April’s enclosure in February. People around the world have been tuning in daily.

April has her own website and even an apparel line. A GoFundMe fundraiser page that initially set a goal of $50,000 sat at more than $125,000 on Saturday morning. The money will be used for the care of the animals.

A contest will be held to decide on a name for the calf.

The park’s livestream was briefly interrupted in February when YouTube pulled the feed after someone reported the images contained explicit material and nudity. Jordan Patch, owner of the Animal Adventure Park, blamed “a handful of extremists and animal rights activists” for the interruption.

The wait for the giraffe became an anxiety-ridden experience for some. A Farmington, New Hampshire, songwriter even posted a music video on YouTube called, “I’m Going Crazy Waiting (For A Giraffe).”

The reaction on Twitter was ebullient and hopeful: “We did it, internet! We had a giraffe baby together;” ”Everybody sticking their neck out for this baby giraffe;” and “On a day where “mother of all bombs” is a trending phrase, I love how the world unites over the birth of a baby giraffe.”

No other details on the calf were announced, but they usually weigh around 150 pounds (68.04 kilograms) and are about 6 feet (1.83 meters) tall at birth. Giraffes are pregnant for 15 months on average.

Animal Adventure park is currently closed to the public and will open in mid-May.

CHICAGO (AP) — The latest on Tax Day protests around the nation (all times local):

6:45 p.m.

Police in Berkeley, California, say 13 people have been arrested and knives and makeshift weapons confiscated after violence erupted at a park where factions that support and oppose President Donald Trump gathered for Tax Day rallies.

About 200 people were at Berkeley’s Martin Luther King Jr. Civic Center Park for separate rallies Saturday when pushing began. Dozens of police officers in riot gear standing nearby quickly arrested one man. Others were taken into custody as fistfights broke out.

Police say demonstrators have left the park but are blocking several streets in the city’s center.

Officials say officers have confiscated knives, flagpoles, helmets and sticks with signs on them, things that were being used as weapons.

Photographs of the scene published online show at least two men with bloodied faces.

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5:10 p.m.

Actress and producer Justine Bateman says Americans need “financial statement proof” that President Donald Trump is not beholden to any business interests or country other than the U.S.

She addressed several thousand people Saturday at a Tax Day rally in downtown Los Angeles to demand that Trump release his tax returns.

Trump was the first major-party nominee in four decades to not release his tax returns, saying it was because he was under audit. He later said that voters don’t care.

But Randall Pitre, of San Dimas, California, said the issue is transparency, adding that nobody knows if it’s a big deal “because we don’t know what he’s hiding.”

Similar protests are being held in dozens more cities including Washington, D.C., Chicago, New York and Palm Beach, Florida.

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3:55 p.m.

North Carolina demonstrators say President Donald Trump’s refusal to release his income tax returns makes them wonder what he might be hiding.

About 200 people gathered at a downtown Raleigh plaza to protest Trump’s decision, as well as his performance in the White House.

Some say Trump’s tax returns might show he has paid little or nothing to run the government he now heads, or that he was deeply indebted to Russian, Chinese or other foreign interests.

Registered nurse Pam Craig, of Greensboro, North Carolina, says she’d like to ask Trump how much he “contributed to this country.”

Trump was the first major-party nominee in four decades to not release his tax returns, saying it was because he was under audit. He later said that voters don’t care.

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2:30 p.m.

Celebrities and lawmakers joined a Tax Day demonstration in New York City, where protesters planned to march to Trump Tower to demand that President Donald Trump release his tax returns.

Comedian Sarah Silverman told The Associated Press that she feels “beholden to be an active citizen.”

Ilene Singh said she and her friend, Geraldine Markowitz, took a bus from New Jersey to join the crowd and “say we care” about Trump’s taxes.

Trump was the first major-party nominee in four decades to not release his tax returns, saying it was because he was under audit. He later said that voters don’t care.

Protesters say Americans deserve to know about Trump’s potential conflicts of interest.

Similar protests are being held in dozens more cities including Washington, D.C., Chicago and Mar-A-Lago, Florida.

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2:05 p.m.

President Donald Trump’s motorcade took a circuitous route back to Mar-A-Lago after he spent Saturday morning at his golf course, avoiding Tax Day protesters headed toward his Palm Beach estate.

Several hundred protesters marched across the bridge that divides West Palm Beach and Palm Beach, chanting and hoisting signs that read “Don the Con,” ”Go back to New York,” ”Show your taxes!” and “Show me the money!”

Organizers say similar Tax Day protests are being held in about 150 cities to demand that Trump release his tax returns.

He was the first major-party nominee in four decades to not release his tax returns, saying it was because he was under audit. He later said that voters don’t care.

Protesters say Americans deserve to know about Trump’s potential conflicts of interest.

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1:25 p.m.

One of Trump’s sharpest critics in the House says that Democrats and Tax Day protesters “will not be quiet” about his taxes.

Democratic Rep. Maxine Waters, of California, spoke at a rally at the U.S. Capitol on Saturday before protesters began marching toward the National Mall.

She says there’s nothing to prevent Trump from releasing his income taxes and that “the simple truth is he’s got a lot to hide.”

Trump is the first major-party nominee in more than 40 years to not release his tax returns, saying it was because he was under audit. He later said that voters don’t care.

Protest organizers say Americans deserve to know about Trump’s business ties and potential conflicts of interest.

Organizers say similar demonstrations are taking place in about 150 cities.

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12:40 p.m.

Protesters are taking to the streets across the country to demand that President Donald Trump release his tax returns.

The Washington, D.C., march began Saturday with a rally at the U.S. Capitol, where Democratic lawmakers called on Trump to stop the secrecy. Organizers say marches are taking place in about 150 cities.

In Washington, D.C., Sen. Ron Wyden called on Trump to ‘knock off the secrecy.” The Oregon Democrat and says the people have “a basic right to know whether the president pays his fair share.”

Trump is the first major party nominee in more than 40 years to not release his tax returns, saying it was because he was under audit. He later said that voters don’t care.

Tuesday is the deadline for taxpayers to file returns.

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9:23 a.m.

Protesters are expected to take part in Tax Day demonstrations nationwide, calling on President Donald Trump to release his tax returns.

Organizers say marches are planned Saturday in about 150 cities, including Washington, D.C., where theirs will begin with a rally at the U.S. Capitol.

Trump is the first major-party nominee in more than 40 years to not release his tax returns, saying it was because he was under audit. He later said that voters don’t care.

Protest organizers say Americans deserve to know about Trump’s business ties and potential conflicts of interest.

Democratic U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, of Massachusetts, on Friday posted an online video urging Congress to force Trump to release the returns.

Tuesday is the deadline for taxpayers to file returns.

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This story has been corrected to show the time stamps are in Central Daylight Time, not Eastern Daylight Time.

ATLANTA (AP) — An attorney is calling for the two Georgia police officers who were fired after being caught on camera having a violent confrontation with a motorist to face criminal charges.

Justin D. Miller said at a news conference Saturday that the firing of Sgt. Michael Bongiovanni and Master Police Officer Robert McDonald was not enough. They were fired Thursday by the Gwinnett County Police Department after being videotaped beating 21-year-old Demetrius Hollins.

The department has opened a criminal investigation into the officers’ behavior.

“We want both of these officers criminally charged,” Miller said. “We want them to have to stand before a Gwinnett County judge in a courtroom full of Gwinnett County citizens, with their legs shackled and their hands cuffed behind their back.

And then we want them to spend the night in the Gwinnett County jail in the general population away from their family and friends. We want them to feel what Demetrius was forced to feel. Maybe then it will click to them what they did to this young man was atrocious and unacceptable and truly unbecoming of law enforcement officers.”

Bongiovanni’s attorney, Mike Pugliese, told WSB-TV Friday what his client did not use not excessive force: “It was an elbow strike, an FBI-taught defensive tactic.”

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports (http://on-ajc.com/2oi1nu2 ) Hollins said during the press conference that the encounter with police was “the scariest moment of my life.”

“The truth would never have come to life without these videos,” Hollins said, reading from a prepared statement. “No one would have believed that I did nothing to provoke an assault I suffered at the hands of these two Gwinnett County police officers. Even now, there are still many people who see me as a criminal, not as a college student or as a son.”

Miller said they’re still mulling a potential lawsuit. He said at least four others have contacted his office claiming mistreatment by the officers.

Miller said they’re asking for a large volume of information from the police department and solicitor’s office, including: a full accounting of the officers’ histories with the department; an investigation into departmental hiring policies; the psychological evaluation for the officers; departmental training practices; disciplinary records of the two officers and every officer in Bongiovanni’s unit; along with a list of the names and contact information for all the people whose cases were dismissed by the solicitor’s office.

A police spokesman said the department wants to “continue being transparent and decisive about this entire incident.”

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Information from: WSB-TV, http://www.wsbtv.com/index.html