NEW YORK (AP) — Olympic gymnastics star Gabby Douglas was hospitalized Sunday night, forcing her to miss a scheduled appearance with her U.S. teammates at the MTV Video Music Awards.

“Gabby is back in the hospital tonight being treated for a seriously infected past mouth injury. She continues to have deep swelling and adverse reactions to medications,” publicist Lesley Burbridge said in an email to The Associated Press.

Earlier Sunday, 20-year-old Douglas posted on social media that she was out of the hospital.

“Out of the hospital & resting comfortably,” Douglas said on Instagram. “#FinalFive so sad I can’t be with u all to present tonite @MTV thank u xoxo #VMAs #myview.”

Douglas had been scheduled to present an award alongside teammates Simone Biles, Laurie Hernandez, Madison Kocian and Aly Raisman at Madison Square Garden.

Virtual reality has moved into the classroom, with a host of online resources to allow students to watch 360-degree videos. Young people can search YouTube for these navigable videos and even use a Google Cardboard for a true virtual reality experience.

So how can students create their own virtual reality experiences? Recently I had the opportunity to visit Unarthodox, a special space in New York City that hosts classes designed to promote creativity and self-expression. One of their newest classes focuses on virtual reality and gives participants a chance to create their own videos. I had the chance to ask the folks at Unarthodox a few questions about how to create virtual reality videos.

What type of camera is used to capture the the 360 degree video?

For our introductory class, we use an entry-level camera. Specifically, the Ricoh Theta S, which shoots 360 degree video at 1080p.

Have you found that YouTube is the best way to share these videos? Are there other options you have explored?

YouTube is definitely a very accessible way to watch 360 videos; however, recent changes to iOS mean that iPhone users are locked out of 360 videos and have to download a separate app. We’re also exploring sharing and viewing through Facebook, but it’s still very early to call any one option the “best.” Everyone wants to be the “Netflix of VR,” but as we’ve seen with the revolution of Hulu, Vimeo, Netflix, Amazon, etc., people will ultimately go wherever the best content is.

How can you envision this technology being used to teach students literacy skills?

With any new platform and technological evolution, there’s a growth in excitement, which translates to motivation. Children are naturally intrinsically motivated, and if you increase the amount of options they have to express themselves and lower the barriers to do so, they’re more likely to accumulate whatever skills they need to create their vision, including literacy skills.

Virtual reality is an exciting tool that can connect to your curriculum. If you’ve tried using VR in your classroom, share your experiences below!

Monica Burns is an Author, Speaker, EdTech & Curriculum Consultant and Apple Distinguished Educator. Visit her site ClassTechTips.com for more ideas on how to become a tech-savvy teacher.

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