WOODBRIDGE, N.J. (AP) — Two New Jersey teens are accused of luring a family of geese into the street so one boy could run them down with his SUV while the other videotaped it.

The New Jersey Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals says Woodbridge police have charged the 17-year-olds with animal abuse charges.

The SPCA says it was alerted to the abuse after the tape was posted on social media.

The group says at least one goose was found in the road. It says the SUV shown in the video was found in a high school parking lot and had feathers embedded in its grill.

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — Florida State has dismissed freshman quarterback De’Andre Johnson from the team on the same day that prosecutors released video showing him punching a woman at a bar.

In a statement Monday, coach Jimbo Fisher announced Johnson’s immediate dismissal. The quarterback had been suspended after the June 24 assault.

In the security camera video released by the State Attorney’s Office, it appears the woman and Johnson were trying to get a position at the bar, and Johnson jostled her.

The woman raises a fist and shouts at Johnson before he grabs her fist and holds it down. She then raises her other hand and swings. It’s not clear whether she made contact, but Johnson responds by punching her in the face while still grabbing her other hand. She staggers, and her nose begins bleeding.

Johnson has been charged with misdemeanor battery.

BEIRUT (AP) — A video posted online Saturday purportedly shows Islamic State fighters killing some 25 Syrian government soldiers in the historic town of Palmyra in central Syria.

The video showed the soldiers being taken in pickup trucks from the town’s notorious Tadmur prison to the amphitheater. At the theater, they were shot dead by young IS members armed with pistols. Hundreds of people were seen watching the killings.

The video did not indicate when the killings took place. The Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said these shootings took place on May 27.

The Associated Press reported in May that scores of Syrian troops and state employees were killed in the days after the Islamic State group captured the town on May 27.

Palmyra is a UNESCO world heritage site famous for its 2,000-year-old Roman colonnades, other ruins and priceless artifacts.

The capture of Palmyra has raised concern that the militants might try to destroy one of the Mideast’s most spectacular archaeological sites — a well-preserved, Roman-era city on the town’s edge — as they have destroyed other pre-Islamic ancient monuments elsewhere in Syria and Iraq.

On Thursday, IS said its militants had destroyed six archaeological pieces from Palmyra that were confiscated from a smuggler.

The shootings in the video took place inside the archaeological site and the troops, some of whom had bruises and blood on their faces apparently as a result of beating, were made to kneel in front of a giant IS black flag before being shot in the back of their heads.

Fans of Lifetime’s melodramatic movies can now see them for $4 a month — without subscribing to cable.

Lifetime’s online video service is the latest move by an entertainment company to bypass the traditional cable bundle, which easily tops $70 a month. For example, HBO has made its shows and movies available online for $15 a month to people who don’t pay for cable, while Showtime has an $11-a-month service debuting this month. CBS and Nickelodeon also have Internet offerings that don’t require a cable subscription.

Subscribers to Lifetime’s service won’t get the regular cable channel, which has ads and is available on many cable and satellite lineups. Rather, the Lifetime Movie Club service will let viewers watch a rotating pool of movies, about 30 at a time, from Lifetime’s library of more than 300 films. They will be shown without commercials. The channel’s reality shows and scripted TV series won’t be available.

Lifetime has long been known for its movies about stalkers, affairs gone bad and thrillers based on juicy headlines. It has been trying to appeal to younger audiences with such movies as “Aaliyah: The Princess of R&B.” It also has reality shows like “Little Women: LA” and the dance show “Bring It.”

“Lifetime movies definitely have a long history but they’ve changed over the years. Some of our biggest events on Lifetime are the movies,” said Dan Suratt, executive vice president for digital at A+E Networks, which owns Lifetime as well as the History channel and A+E.

While other online video services such as Dish Network’s Sling TV are aimed at people who don’t subscribe to cable, Suratt said he expects the movie app to be “entirely complementary” to Lifetime’s TV channel.

Like many channels, Lifetime’s primetime viewership has declined this year, according to Nielsen.

The new Lifetime Movie Club service will work on iPhones and iPads, with other devices coming this fall.

— Tali Arbel, AP Technology Writer

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Sprint is introducing an “all-in” pricing plan, meaning a single, $80-a-month price that includes both a smartphone and a service plan for voice, text and unlimited data.

The new plan, though billed as simpler, won’t have many benefits for consumers. Prices for a Samsung Galaxy S6 and HTC One M9 won’t change, as it had been $20 for the phone and $60 for the service plan. An iPhone 6 plan will cost $10 a month more as Sprint gets rid of a promotion. These three phones are the only ones eligible, as they are among the most popular.

With the new pricing, Sprint is going back to how all wireless plans used to be sold. Until recently, phone companies routinely offered subsidies on phones in exchange for two-year contracts and made up for that in higher monthly fees. In the name of transparency, T-Mobile lowered the monthly service fees two years ago and started charging for the phone separately. AT&T, Verizon and Sprint followed on some of its plans.

Now, Sprint is returning to the old ways in combining the two charges.

There’s one big difference: Sprint is leasing the phone. Customers have to turn it in when upgrading or pay extra to keep it. With subsidies, customers own the phones outright and have no obligations beyond the two-year contract. That means a customer can resell the phone when upgrading or cancelling service.

In a statement, T-Mobile described the move as a “pushback against a trend that wireless users have overwhelmingly supported.” T-Mobile says separating the charges gives consumers more information to make better choices.

Sprint will still sell phones outright, though at higher monthly prices. Those options aren’t as prominent on Sprint’s website.

Sprint’s $80-a-month price doesn’t include taxes and surcharges, including a one-time $36 activation fee.

— Anick Jesdanun, AP Technology Writer

CENTENNIAL, Colo. (AP) — As the chaos of a shooting at a packed movie theater continued to unfold outside, James Holmes sat in a sterile police interview room, toying with staples, staring at walls and playing with paper bags put on his hands to preserve gunshot residue.

Holmes’ defense attorneys on Wednesday began showing a four-hour video of his bizarre, post-shooting behavior as they try to convince jurors he was legally insane when he killed 12 people and injured 70 more in during a midnight movie premiere.

They say the video of Holmes in a ripped T-shirt and boxers with fiery orange hair is proof he was in the grips of a psychotic episode during the July 20, 2012 attack.

The video opens with Holmes fiddling with items on a table and picking at an electrical socket with a staple before a police officer tells him to stop. It’s about 5 a.m., five hours after he opened fire on the theater.

The footage is mostly silent except for the eerie crackle of police radios still dispatching officers to the theater and a bomb squad to Holmes’ apartment, which he had rigged into an explosive booby trap. At one point, while Holmes sits motionless, the dispatchers can be heard sending officers to a mandatory debriefing with a police psychologist.

But if Holmes can hear the faint noise, he seems oblivious. He inquires about the bags place officers place over his hands to preserve gunshot residue.

“What do you think it’s for?” an officer asks him.

“Popcorn,” he replies, flatly.

He then plays with the paper bags on his hands as if they were puppets, although prosecutors have suggested that he was tapping out the drum beat of the techno music he had been listening to when he took aim at moviegoers.

Defense attorneys have spent nearly a week calling deputies, jail nurses and doctors who have observed Holmes’ odd behavior months and weeks after the shooting, but the video was the most substantial piece of evidence they have shown that gives insight into his demeanor immediately following the attack.

Prosecutors, who say he was sane and are seeking the death penalty, have focused on other elements of the footage, such as Holmes’ ability to easily and accurately answer an officer’s questions about his age and address, height and weight.

Soon after the officer leaves the room, Holmes appears to lean his head against a wall and fall asleep.

MAYPORT NAVAL STATION, Fla. (AP) — A submarine sailor has pleaded guilty to illegally videotaping female officers in the vessel’s shower area, and has been sentenced to 10 months in a Navy brig.

Petty Officer 2nd Class Ryan Secrest pleaded guilty Monday to charges that he made the video and lied to investigators. He also received a bad conduct discharge and a reduction in rank.

Secrest is among seven sailors charged in a case that has disrupted the Navy’s integration of women into its submarine force. The women in the videos were among the first to serve on subs.

Military prosecutors say Secrest in 2014 used the camera on his cellphone to take a video of the officers.

Secrest is the sixth sailor tried in the case, and the fifth to be found guilty.